Feral hogs photographed in Central Ohio

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Though ODNR has yet to confirm feral swine reside in Central Ohio, a Delaware County resident has photographic evidence that hogs reside on his livestock farm.According to ODNR, “feral swine are a combination of Eurasian wild boar and escaped or neglected domestic swine. Introduced to the United States in 1539, they are now present in at least 35 states. Feral swine cause significant damage directly to agricultural crops and property, as well as natural resources each year. “Though this particular invasive species may taste good, it is clear the damage feral swine cause far outweighs their deliciousness. Because of the destructive nature of feral hogs, most Ohio residents do not wish to see this form of wildlife on their property.This map reveals ODNR confirmed populations of feral swine. Map courtesy of ODNR.According to ODNR, “currently, known breeding populations of feral swine have been confirmed in Adams, Ashtabula, Athens, Belmont, Gallia, Hocking, Jackson, Lawrence, Monroe, Ross, Scioto, and Vinton counties.”Despite the fact that ODNR has yet to verify their presence in Central Ohio, the Delaware County resident that photographed feral hogs on his property has noticed signs of feral hogs for the last several years.“The first indication that we had was some time between Thanksgiving and Christmas of 2013 when we found some scat on the edge of the field,” he said. “We did an Internet search and the closest match that we could find was pig scat.  Now that my wife has a pet pig, I can definitely say that it was pig scat.”In addition to scat, this Delaware County farmer has seen further evidence of hogs on his property the last few years.“We have seen a bit of rooting evidence near the barn and some in the field,” he said. “It doesn’t appear that there are more than a couple of pigs on the property at this point.”According to ODNR,  “ridding Ohio of feral swine will take cooperation between wildlife managers, agricultural producers and hunters. Hunters can aid in removal of swine and are encouraged to do so as opportunities arise. There is no closed season on feral swine.”The feral hog in the photo with this blog was captured on a trail camera in February of 2015 in Delaware County, Ohio.Has anyone else seen evidence of feral hogs outside of the regions confirmed to be home to feral swine in Ohio? I hope the answer is no, but if you have be sure to report sightings by e-mail to the ODNR Division of Wildlife (wildinfo@dnr.state.oh.us).Also leave your comments below or send photos to ocjstaff@ocj.com about your experiences with the feral hog population that unfortunately seems to be spreading in Ohio.last_img

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