Ebola Rescue Drama Thrills MacDonald Street Residents

first_imgThe Ebola infected man sat with his head bowed and apparently in pain as he emitted sounds of uneasiness.  Further from him, a woman, his wife, began to shout through a public address system, (PA), “Please husband don’t die.” It was evident that the fear of the unusual transmission of the deadly Ebola virus was central to the woman’s fear to go near her husband. All she was saying was, “Please don’t die,” when in fact he was losing it gradually. He was dying because out of her frustration, she had not followed the instruction to call the 4455 to get assistance from the Ebola Response Team to save her husband’s life. Meanwhile, another man, aware of what to do in such a situation, pulled a mobile phone from his pocket and began to call the Ebola Response Team.  “Yes,” he said, “there is a man who is suspected of having the Ebola virus here.” After some back and forth discussion on the phone, he turned to the woman and assured her, “Don’t worry they are coming to give the help your husband needs.”  In a few minutes, the Ebola Response Team arrived, and a man dressed in white, personal protective equipment (PPE) gear against the Ebola virus jumped out of the jeep.  “We are here to help you,” he assured the woman, who seemed very much confused.  “If you take my husband away,” the woman wanted to know from the man in white, “you are not going to take his kidney and sell it?”  “No,” the man said, and he began to address the woman’s misconceptions. “We don’t take kidneys from anyone who is suspected of suffering from this disease.” “It is that true?” the woman asked, her face askance, unsure what to believe. “You are not going to kill him, are you?” “No,” the man said, “we don’t do that to anyone who is taken to the Ebola Unit. We provide them with proper care and we make sure that they are fine.  “Early detection is the best way to give anyone suspected of suffering from the virus and it is a good chance for him to survive it,” the man in white reassured the lady.  Doing away of her disbelief, the woman said, “So all the bad things I heard about what you do to Ebola patient is not true?”  “Yes,” the man reassured her.  The man in Ebola protected gear held the suspected Ebola victim and slowly led him to the waiting jeep to be transported to a recognized Center for testing and supervision.   Meanwhile, many bystanders watched the scene from afar as this drama unfolded.  It was an awareness campaign by the Medical Renaissance League performed yesterday on MacDonald Street, near the Daily Observer newspaper’s offices.  The brief drama, according to the organization’s administrator, Ms. Theresa Praud, is part of her group’s Ebola Awareness Campaign in Montserrado County in the fight against the deadly disease.  Bystanders enjoyed the drama and, for a minute they behaved as though they were convinced that the message had been effectively communicated.  “I now know what the medical people are doing to help us,” said a woman who said she enjoyed the drama.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img

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