Phil Gerbyshak on Selling Techniques for Social Media and Beyond – Episode #76

first_imgTweets you can use to share this episodeThe selling techniques of today’s salesperson needs to have a marketing approachClick To TweetHow to make a real connection instead of just transacting, on this episodeClick To TweetSubscribe toIn the ArenaApple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsAndroidby EmailRSSOr subscribe with your favorite app by using the address below Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Now Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 1:05:38 — 60.2MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Email | Google Podcasts | RSSThere is no end to the books and blog posts you can find hawking selling techniques. And that’s a good thing. But many of the authors who post that content haven’t done the work needed to become an expert at the new landscape that sales professionals are presented with in the digital age. Social sales and the RIGHT way to approach it is one of the most important things any salesperson can learn, and on this episode of the podcast Phil Gerbyshak and Anthony Iannarino take on that topic and much more. You’ll come away from this recording with tons of actionable content, so be sure you listen.Phil Gerbyshak on Selling Techniques for Social Media and Beyond – Episode #76Click To TweetThe selling techniques of today’s salesperson needs to have a marketing approach.Too frequently, salespeople think in categorical terms about their role. “I’m not a marketer, I’m a salesperson.” The distinction can be important in certain contexts but in the rapidly changing internet world we are doing sales in, it’s becoming less and less important. If you’re going to be successful at sales some of your techniques have to be from the marketing toolbox. Phil Gerbyshak makes the case for why salespeople are marketers in the digital age we live in, and why it’s important for them to become skilled at that part of the equation, on this episode.The social tech out there has changed how effective sales is done these days.Your sales conversations are not what they used to be. Have you noticed? You used to vomit out a powerpoint presentation or slide deck, tell everything you did, and your prospects only had that to go on. But it’s not that way anymore. Now prospects can research your company, research you, and know just about everything you have to offer in a relatively short period of time. So the techniques you use to approach them, make the connection, start the sales conversation, and get to the sale have all changed as a result. Do you know how to navigate those new waters effectively? Phil and Anthony can tell you how so be sure you listen to this episode.The social tech out there has changed how effective sales is done these daysClick To TweetHow to make a real connection instead of just transacting.The “social” part of social selling has more to do with building authentic relationships than it does selling anything. The “know, like, and trust” aspects of the sales cycle are more important than ever. That means you’ve got to make a real connection with prospects instead of just shooting for a transactional approach. It takes more time, sure – but the benefits far outweigh the time spent by producing long lasting, loyal clients who trust you. If you don’t know how to make those kinds of connections with prospects and clients, you’ve got to hear this episode of In The Arena.Why you still need to make in person connections and how to take them online.When Anthony Iannarino and Phil Gerbyshak were talking about how to make connections in the social media age we live in, Anthony immediately took the conversation to the importance of making connections offline. He believes that the first touch with a person is much more powerful if it’s done in a personal way – face to face if possible. Those types of connections stick in the mind more powerfully and enable a more authentic and trusting interaction on social media than anything else. That’s a sales technique few salespeople are applying these days because they believe that social media is all they need. Find out how to tweak your process to be more personal and more effective, on this episode.Why you still need to make in-person connections and how to take them onlineClick To TweetOutline of this great episode Anthony’s introduction to Phil Gerbyshak. The unique approach to this episode: a dual interview. Phil’s experience with NSA and what he’s teaching recently. Why keynote speakers can be “transactional” in their approach these days. Helping salespeople use their social toolkit in the new digital age. What people should be doing to expand their network (besides LinkedIn). How technology enables us to stay connected in more relationships. How Anthony’s book came to be and the journey toward publication. How Anthony went from Rock N Roll to sales. Why sales is one of the most noble professions. The default mindset people (including salespeople) have to overcome. How Anthony is able to write a blog post every day. What Anthony does to build relationships online and offline. Why closing is not asking for the sale. Book recommendations from both guys. Actions you can take to improve yourself as a sales professional. How you can get your hands on Anthony’s new book.Our Sponsors:Heroic Public Speaking – Michael Port’s incredible public speaking programThe Only Sales Guide You’ll Ever NeedResources & Links mentioned in this episodewww.PhilGerbyshak.comDunbar’s NumberUlysses AppScrivener1419584359 15706274440814437761B000AP7XAA18903441171591848164The theme song “Into the Arena” is written and produced by Chris Sernel. You can find it on SoundcloudConnect with AnthonyWebsite: www.TheSalesBlog.comYoutube: www.Youtube.com/IannarinoFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/iannarinoTwitter: https://twitter.com/iannarinoGoogle Plus: https://plus.google.com/+SAnthonyIannarinoLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/iannarinolast_img read more

Adityanath cracks whip on latecomers

first_imgFollowing reports of Noida Authority staff allegedly not reaching office on time, Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath on Monday sought the employee details of both Noida and Greater Noida Authorities.Mr. Adityanath also ordered that 73 employees of the Noida Authority, who had not been marking themselves present on biometric machine, be marked absent for the corresponding days. He also ordered that their salaries be deducted.Noida and Greater Noida Authority CEO Deepak Agarwal confirmed this. “The Chief Minister has asked for details such as the employees’ income, assets, ranks, tenure, departments, etc. While 40% of the staff members in the Greater Noida Authority have submitted their details, employees of the Noida Authority are yet to file the same,” said Mr. Agarwal.Plugging corruptionSoon after assuming office on March 19, Mr. Adityanath had directed Ministers and top officials to provide details of their income and assets within 15 days. He had said rooting out corruption in government offices was his main agenda. However, a majority of the officials failed to adhere to the deadline of April 7.Mr. Agarwal further said that to improve work culture in the authorities, he had asked the employees to mark their attendance on biometric machines. Failure to comply with the order would amount to strict action, he added.The Noida Authority had on March 23 installed biometric machines to crack down on employees who would reach office late. The Noida Authority’s offices are located in sectors 6, 5, 19 and 39. According to rules, the employees must reach office by 9:30 a.m. and not leave before 5 p.m. The two authorities work for five days a week. ‘30% staff absent’“During an inspection, I found that around 30% of the staff was absent. Whoever reaches office after 9:30 a.m. will be marked absent,” said Mr. Agarwal.Earlier, every employee had to sign on an attendance sheet. However, many would sign the sheet in the month-end. With the introduction of biometric attendance, the flaw was exposed. Explanation sought“We have also sought an explanation from those who were not present at 9:30 a.m.,” the CEO said.“If they will fail to furnish a satisfactory reply, we will take action against them. If absent employees are repeatedly absent, we will take departmental action against them,” he added.last_img read more

Army in for the long haul in Doklam

first_imgThe Army is ready for the long haul in holding onto its position in the Doklam area near the Bhutan tri-junction, notwithstanding China ratcheting up rhetoric against India, demanding pulling back of its troops.The soldiers deployed in the disputed area have pitched tents, in an indication that they are unlikely to retreat unless there was reciprocity from Chinese personnel in ending the face-off at an altitude of around 10,000 feet in the Sikkim section.A steady line of supplies is being maintained for the soldiers at the site, official sources said, signalling that the Army is not going to wilt under any pressure from China. At the same time, they sounded confident of finding a diplomatic solution to the dispute, citing resolution of border skirmishes in the past through diplomacy.Though China has been aggressively asserting that it was not ready for any “compromise” and that the “ball is in India’s court”, the view in the security establishment here is that there cannot be any unilateral approach in defusing the tension.Security implicationsBoth the countries had agreed to a mechanism in 2012 to resolve border flare-ups through consultations at various levels.The mechanism has not worked so far in the current case as the standoff near the Bhutan trijunction, triggered by China’s attempt to build a road in the strategically important area, has dragged on for over three weeks.New Delhi has already conveyed to Beijing that such an action would represent a significant change of status quo with “serious” security implications for India. The road link could give China a major military advantage over India.Doka La is the Indian name for the region which Bhutan recognises as Dokalam, while China claims it as part of its Donglang region. China and Bhutan are engaged in talks. India argues that since it is a tri-junction involving the three countries, it also has a say in the issue.last_img read more

Officers and a godwoman: Radhe Maa lands Delhi Police in trouble

first_imgRadhe Maa with SHO Sanjay Sharma at Vivek Vihar police station in east Delhi.  | Photo Credit: Special Arrangement In a major embarrassment to the Delhi police, visuals showing controversial self-styled godwoman Radhe Maa sitting on a Station House Officer’s chair at a police station and swaying with policemen at a Ram Lila function in different parts of Shahdara district have surfaced on social media.Both the instances allegedly happened in a span of a few hours on the intervening nights of September 28 and 29.Two suspendedSo far two police officers, including the Station House Officer who allegedly offered his designated seat to Radhe Maa to sit, have been suspended while four others have been sent to district lines even as top police officers themselves conceded that this kind of conduct was “unacceptable” and “unprofessional”.  The police station concerned is Vivek Vihar where she went first around 12.30 a.m. and the image that has surfaced shows the in-charge Sanjay Sharma and two other policemen standing next to the chair occupied by the godwoman.Not just this, it is also seen that Mr. Sharma has his hands folded and is also wearing a red-coloured chunni, which her disciples are known to wear.In his defence, the officer said that she wanted to use the toilet of the police station as she had come to attend a Ram Lila function but could not explain the gesture of folding hands.last_img read more

TSR commandant held in Tripura scribe’s murder case

first_imgPolice on Wednesday arrested commandant of the Tripura State Rifles (TSR) Tapan Debbarma, in connection with the killing of senior journalist Sudip Datta Bhowmik at the 2nd battalion headquarters near here on Tuesday. His personal bodyguard Nandalal was earlier arrested for shooting down the journalist allegedly on the instructions of the commandant.Both the accused booked under IPC Sections 302, 109 and 27 of the Arms Act were sent to police remand for a period of 10 days when they were produced before the west Tripura Chief Judicial Magistrate. They have been kept at a city police station for interrogation by the CID, which has been entrusted with the investigation.Initial interrogation of accused rifleman Nandalal revealed that the killing of Mr. Bhowmik occurred inside the office chamber of Mr. Tapan. “He told us that despite his reluctance the commandant forced him to open fire,” a police officer told The Hindu on condition of anonymity.“After firing a single shot from his AK 47 automatic weapon, Nandalal became nervous and hurriedly left the room leaving the journalist in a pool of blood. The commandant let the critically wounded journalist die without medical attention.”The senior crime reporter had written 11 articles in daily Syandan Patrika against massive financial irregularities in the 2nd battalion of TSR.last_img read more

Understanding the Brahmaputra and the annual flooding in Assam

first_imgSand is being dug from the river Brahmaputra due to massive siltation in the water ways in the outskirts of Guwahati on November 25, 2015. Gulzarilal Nanda, Union Planning Minister, visit a rapid survey of flood and erosion-affected areas of Assam on August 22, 1954. Photo shows the Union Minister (third from right) looking at the swirling Brahmaputra at Palasbari about 14 miles from Guwahati.  | Photo Credit: The Hindu Archives The permanent destruction of wetlands in the State has also been contributing to the deluge. File The massive earthquake that ravaged Assam on Independence Day that year not only claimed over 1,000 lives, but also changed the course of the mighty Brahmaputra. The riverbed rose as the mountains shook, and what had been a stable course became a constantly shifting one eroding the banks.This especially increased the amount of silt carried by the river and its tributaries. The silt was deposited on the banks downstream, and on the riverbed. Due to this heavy deposition, the river “frequently changes its course with the main channel flowing into multiple channels” hitting the river bank causing further erosion, a study published in 2014 by the Civil Engineering Department, Royal Group of Institutions explains.The riverbed area of the Brahmaputra has increased by more than 50 per cent through erosion since the quake. According to a report on climate change published by the government of Assam in September 2015, erosion has destroyed more than 3,800 square kilometres of farmland, which is nearly half the size of Sikkim, since 1954. Due to erosion, the riverbed area has expanded from around 3,870 sq.km. estimated between 1916 and 1928 to 6,080 sq.km. in 2006. Based on the civil engineering report, between 1954 and 2008 about 4,27,000 hectares has been eroded at the rate of 8,000 hectares per year.  Controlling the floodsOne of the main methods used in the State to control floods is embankments, but almost every year the Brahmaputra and the Barak breach their banks, inundating agricultural land and houses. “The most recent embankments are 25 years old,” says Himanshu Thakkar, coordinator of the South Asia Network on Dams, Rivers and People. “Checking embankments before monsoon should be done as we never know where it will be breached. When the flow is extreme, erosion capacity is greater,” he adds.In August this year, the State government announced that as many as five dredgers will be used to deepen the Brahmaputra, and the harvested silt will be used to construct the 725-km Brahmaputra Expressway along both banks of the river. In an earlier report, the Chief Minister Sarbananda Sonowal told The Hindu: “We believe it will not only improve the water-carrying capacity of the Brahmaputra, but also make the river navigable for bigger cargo ships. That used to be the case before Independence.”Sanjoy Hazarika, director of the Commonwealth Human Rights Initiative is unconvinced. He is for an engineering assessment, along with environment assessment, as dredging “might change the course of river.” Mr. Thakkar adds that the way dredging is done followed by the construction of highway on both banks will determine the changes the river will see.The Brahmaputra Board, under the Ministry of Water Resources, had suggested constructing dams in Assam and Arunachal Pradesh about 30 years ago, the Subansiri project being one of them. Subansiri was initially designed as a hydro-power and storage dam, which the board believed would help reduce the impact of floods. However, it was later transformed into just a hydroelectric project aimed at generating 2000 megawatts of electricity, which invited opposition from local people and environment scientists.There is the possibility that hydro electric projects can worsen the situation. “Ranganadi project is a classic example of damage caused by the dam in downstream,” Mr. Thakkar points out. The dam in Arunachal Pradesh — part of a hydro-electric project — is on the Ranganadi tributary of Brahmaputra. During winter the river barely exists, but during monsoon it swells up, inundating villages. The All Assam Students’ Union in July this year demanded demolition of the Ranganadi hydro project, alleging that release of water by the North Eastern Electric Power Corp. on July 11 without prior notice affected hundreds of thousands of people in Lakhimpur and Majuli, media reported.  A similar story was told by Nishikant Deka, 80, of Gorubandha, a village about 40 km from Guwahati. He and his 12-member family had to evacuate their house in neck-deep water and take shelter at a naamghar (public prayer hall). They managed to carry some rice, and food provided once in a while by NGOs kept them going. The head of the house described how almost every year the family has to reconstruct the bamboo home that floodwaters destroy.The government of Assam estimates that 2,753 human lives have been lost along with 6,73,329 cattle and the total losses due to floods and erosion amount to nearly ₹4659.472 crore. Flooding this year took the lives of 157 people and destroyed hundreds of acres of land. According to the state disaster management authorities, in the past five years, flooding has killed about 500 people. | Photo Credit: Ritu Raj Konwar The permanent destruction of wetlands in the State has also been contributing to the deluge. Assam is home to more than 3,000 wetlands and many varieties of flora and fauna. “Wetlands, locally known as beels, act as reservoirs and rejuvenating them before monsoon can help in mitigating flood in parts of the state,” said Dulal Chandra Goswami, former head of department of environmental science at Guwahati University.“Wetlands play a very significant role as natural reservoirs of water that absorb part of the flood waters from the nearby rivers through their connected channels and also from surface runoff,” Mr. Goswami explains. Most of these wetlands are in derelict condition mainly due to human-induced factors such as encroachment for agriculture or infrastructure development.“To mitigate floods, any potential practical solution should be based on an integrated, multidisciplinary basin management plan focused on water and soil conservation together with geo-environmental, eco-biological and socio-cultural integrity of the basin,” Mr. Goswami says. “The basin management approach is essential in view of the interstate as well as international character of most of the tributaries and the mainstream.”Effects of Climate ChangeCompounding the issue of an unpredictable Brahmaputra, are the effects of climate change. “Climate change will result in more frequent and severe floods, which will increase the costs of reconstruction and maintenance on state infrastructure, including roads, irrigation, water and sanitation,” says the report on climate change published by the Assam government.According to the study, by 2050, the average annual runoff of the river Brahmaputra will decline by 14 per cent. However, there is a risk of glaciers melting, leading to flash floods.As the economy of Assam is largely dependent on natural resources, what happens with agriculture and forests has direct effects on the livelihood of its people. During floods, water becomes contaminated, and climate change has a direct impact on the water resources sector by increasing the scarcity of freshwater, which is a constant problem in summer.“The predicted increase in average temperature and decrease in the number of rainy days due to climate change will further stress water resources,” the report points out.The study goes on to say that heavier rainfall replacing continuous low or normal rainfall during monsoon might lead to flash floods in low-lying areas. This will also reduce the groundwater recharge. | Photo Credit: Ritu Raj Konwar  Change in approachWhile the present approach towards flood has been immediate relief, much more need to be done before torrential rains hit the State during monsoon. The short-term measures on which flood management in the State presently depends, such as rebuilding the breached embankments, are largely inadequate.Besides, more accurate and decentralised forecasts of rain can help in improving preparedness. “Weather reports should be made available on district level and should be accessible to public,” says Mr. Thakkar of the South Asia Network on Dams, Rivers and People. “Information should be available in local languages. With the forecast in, one can calculate how much more water will flow downstream, thereby alerting people in advance to evacuate. The nature of rivers is such that there is no way one can flood-proof whole of Assam so one has to keep it mind that floods will happen.”He adds that the water flow information shared by China on the Brahmaputra with India, for which India pays a certain amount, should also be shared with the public, as this will help in understanding the river better and therefore help people better prepare for floods.As the research scholars point out, studying the river and the impact of climate change is a must to understand why the state gets flooded every year. As line in a famous Assamese song goes: “Luitar parore ami deka lora; moribole bhoi nai (We are the youths from the banks of the Luit [Brahmaputra]; we are not afraid of death),” people in the Valley seems to be living by the same spirit. The human costLalita Biswas, 30, a daily wage earner at a brick factory in Morigaon, Assam, had to leave her submerged house in a village in Morigaon in a boat provided by villagers and take shelter in an open space on a nearby hillock. She was living in a polythene tent with her husband, who also works at the brick factory, and children. Her children have suffered from colds and fevers, and her family did not receive any help from the government, she said.“We’re always neglected because we are poor,” she said when asked if she had received any help from the state authorities. Ms. Biswas wasn’t alone. About 100 people climbed the hills to escape the flood and have to rebuild their houses and lives.Also Read All you need to know about Assam floods Marooned houses in the flood affected Morigaon district of Assam. “The river was swollen the morning after the earthquake, which seemed to last for an eternity. We saw fallen trees in it, people and animals flailing, dead bodies of people and animals that were carried on the strong current.”Krishna Chawla (née Das) was 13 when a strong earthquake that lasted about eight minutes jolted Assam and adjacent areas on the evening of August 15, 1950.The Brahmaputra River, which was always “eating away at parts of the state,” looked terrifying, she recollects. “All of us students went to help build embankments the next day, and while I was passing a bag full of sand to a fellow student, I saw the river take away the house I was born in. The house collapsed, and I stood there paralysed,” said Ms. Chawla, the daughter of a forest officer in Dibrugarh. | Photo Credit: Ritu Raj Konwarlast_img read more

Tendulkar to bat for J&K school

first_imgCricket icon Sachin Tendulkar has sanctioned over ₹40 lakh from the MP Local Area Development (MPLAD) funds for the construction of a school building in Bandipora district of North Kashmir.The letter he wrote to DM & District Collector Deependra Singh Kushwah, is in possession of PTI.Mr. Tendulkar, in his letter, mentioned that the Imperial Educational Institute Drugmulla, had requested funds and “the request must be scrutinised.” The description of work requested include construction of a school building with 10 class rooms, four laboratories, an adminstrative block, six toilets and an assembly/prayer hall.last_img read more

BJP may rope in Aseemanand to work in West Bengal

first_imgThe BJP in West Bengal is planning to rope in Hindutva preacher Swami Aseemanand, who was acquitted in the Mecca Masjid blast case earlier this week, to strengthen its base, its State unit chief said here on Thursday.“I have personally known Swami Aseemanand for a long time. I will talk to him and try to bring him to West Bengal so that he can work here. For a long time, he has worked among the tribals in Bengal. He can help us in a lot of ways,” BJP State president Dilip Ghosh said.A special anti-terror court on Monday acquitted the 66-year-old self-confessed monk and four others in the 2007 Mecca Masjid blast case, holding that the prosecution failed to prove “even a single allegation” against them.Aseemanand’s younger brother, Sushanta Sarkar, is presently secretary of the BJP’s Hooghly unit.Mr. Sarkar said he would be happy if his brother returned to the State to work. “Our entire family is dedicated towards the Sangh Parivar. If my brother comes to Bengal and wants to work here, we will be very happy,” Mr. Sarkar said.A science graduateAseemanand, who was born Naba Kumar Sarkar at Kamarpukur in West Bengal’s Hooghly district, completed his graduation in science in 1971.He became involved with right-wing groups from school, going on to work full time with the Vanvasi Kalyan Ashram in Purulia and Bankura districts of the State. It was at the ashram that Naba Kumar Sarkar was christened Swami Aseemanand in 1981.last_img read more

AFSPA will continue in Nagaland: Rijiju

first_imgMinister of State for Home Kiren Rijiju said AFSPA, the Armed Forces (Special Powers) Act, 1958, will continue in Nagaland as it is a “special case” and the “peace agreement” hasn’t been finalised there yet.Nagaland is the only State in the northeast, apart from eight police stations in Arunachal Pradesh, where ASFPA continues to be imposed by the Union Home Ministry.Nagaland, Manipur and Assam are the only three States in the northeast that continue to be under AFSPA.Last year, the Home Ministry gave up its power and asked the Assam government to take a decision on continuing AFSPA in the State. The Act gives powers to the Army and the Central forces deployed in “disturbed areas” to kill anyone acting in contravention of law, arrest and search any premises without a warrant and provide cover to forces from prosecution and legal suits without the Centre’s sanction.State to renew pleaNagaland’s Deputy Chief Minister Y. Patton said the State government would reiterate its request to the Centre to revoke AFSPA.“The discussion on the Naga political situation is on and we are expecting the Government of India to solve the problem at the earliest. We have requested to lift AFSPA but we have been asked to wait for some time. When the solution (Naga deal) comes, automatically AFSPA will go,” Mr. Patton said.NSCN-IM signed a framework agreement with the Government of India on August 3, 2015 to find a solution to the Naga issue.The NSCN-IM has been fighting for ‘Greater Nagaland’ or Nagalim — it wants to extend Nagaland’s borders by including Naga-dominated areas in neighbouring Assam, Manipur and Arunachal Pradesh, to unite 1.2 million Nagas.Mr. Rijiju told The Hindu, “Revocation of AFSPA in Meghalaya is definitely related to improvement of the security scenario in the northeast. AFSPA is imposed both by the State and the Centre. It was withdrawn by Tripura (in 2015).‘No politics’“It is a joint effort by the State government and the Centre. Security is a subject where both the Centre and the State should come together without any politics. In Assam also the situation has improved, that is why the Home Ministry withdrew it but it is imposed by the State government.”He said he was not sure if AFSPA would be lifted from Nagaland in future.‘Many factions involved’“Nagaland is a special case…the peace agreement has not come about yet. There are many underground factions as well. There are issues like rivalry among different factions…I cannot say about the future policy,” Mr. Rijiju said. On April 1, the Home Ministry revoked AFSPA in Meghalaya and restricted it to eight police stations instead of 16 in Arunachal Pradesh.Nagaland, Manipur and Assam are the only three States in the northeast that continue to be under AFSPA. Except Tripura and Manipur, the Centre was issuing such notifications for Assam, Nagaland, Arunachal Pradesh and Meghalaya.Last year, the Home Ministry gave up its power and asked the Assam government to take a decision on continuing AFSPA in the State. In the case of Assam (excluding areas covered by the Guwahati municipality) and Manipur (except seven Assembly constituencies in Imphal) the respective State governments exercise the right.As per the Home Ministry’s data, in the northeast, there has been a reduction of 96 % in casualties among the security forces from 289 in 1997 to 12 in 2017. Civilian casualties also dropped by 96% from 907 in 2000 to 37 last year. The year 2017 recorded the lowest insurgency incidents.last_img read more

Former Bulandshahr legislator found dead

first_imgA former MLA was on Wednesday found dead under mysterious circumstances in his house in Bulandshahr, the police said.Haji Aleem Khan, a Bahujan Samaj Party leader, was found dead in his room, with a pistol lying next to his body, said Bulandshahr Superintendent of Police (City) Pravin Ranjan Singh.According to preliminary information, the former legislator had returned home late on Tuesday night and did not open his door till 10 a.m. the next day.”People knocked on the door and even dialled his cell phone to wake him up. When he didn’t answer the calls, a child was sent inside the room through a ladder after a grill was opened,” Mr. Singh said. It is not clear if he was shot, the police said.Khan’s body has been sent for post-mortem examination.last_img read more

Refinery given week’s time to demolish wall on jumbo corridor

first_imgThe administration of eastern Assam’s Golaghat district had set a week’s deadline to Numaligarh Refinery Limited (NRL) to demolish a boundary wall erected on a major elephant corridor.The Supreme Court had on January 18 ordered NRL to remove the 2.2 km wall around its proposed township that included a golf course. The refinery was given a month’s time to comply.In a notice to NRL’s Chief General Manager (Human Resources) on February 14, the district’s Deputy Commissioner said the refinery should demolish the entire wall within seven days and ensure that the land so acquired was kept free of any barrier for facilitating the movement of elephants.The order, the notice pointed out, was in reference to the apex court’s order as well as that of the National Green Tribunal (NGT) in 2016.Environmentalists had objected to the wall the refinery had erected in 2011 in – as the NGT had observed later – a part of the 133.45-hectare Deopahar Reserve Forest which the Assam Forest Department notified a day after the Supreme Court’s order.The refinery received flak from wildlife activists when a seven-year-old male elephant died of haemorrhage in May 2015 after trying to force its way through the wall. Videos also captured herds trying to cross the high boundary wall with barbed wire in vain. In August 2016, the NGT ordered NRL to demolish the wall within a month, but only a 289-metre stretch was demolished.The refinery challenged the NGT order to demolish the entire wall, but the Supreme Court said “there cannot be any township as elephants have the first right on forest”.last_img read more

Maharashtra Budget session curtailed to ease pressure on police

first_imgTo ensure tight security in the city and adequate police deployment across the city in wake of the current tension on the India-Pakistan border, the Budget session of the Maharashtra legislature was curtailed on Thursday. Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis said in the Assembly that at least 6,000 police personnel are deployed in the Vidhan Sabha presmises during the session. “There is tension at the border and at this time it is important to maintain internal security. Mumbai being the financial capital of the country, the vigil needs to be tighter. There is no need to panic, but we must take extra precaution,” said Mr. Fadnavis. He informed the Assembly, that in a meeting [all party? or CM only?] held with security establishments [when?], it was observed that police required extra force to ensure adequate deployment. “This was conveyed to leaders of all political parties and it was unanimously decided to curtail the session. This decision has been taken to ensure the release of extra police force and make them available to provide security cover at other areas,” he said, reiterating that there is no need to panic. Mumbai police intelligence sources had told The Hindu on Wednesday that the city was put on high alert since the air strikes. Vote on accountThe Assembly approved the vote-on-account which has budgetary provisions for four months of the next financial year (April to July this year), without any debate.Leader of Opposition Radhakrishna Vikhe-Patil and Nationalist Congress Party (NCP) MLAs Ajit Pawar and Jayant Patil said they were tabling their respective speeches on the interim budgetary provisions on the floor of the House. The appropriation Bill and vote-on-account were subsequently passed by a voice vote. The House was then adjourned for an hour and a meeting of the State cabinet was also held.Earlier, at the start of the day, NCP legislator Jitendra Awhad urged Mr. Fadnavis to move a motion that the State along with rest of the country stood firmly behind the armed forces and Wing Commander Abhinandan Varthaman, who was captured by Pakistan after an air combat on Wednesday. Accordingly, a one-line resolution was unanimously passed with the Assembly expressing solidarity with armed forces and demanding release of Wg. Cdr. Varthaman.last_img read more

Two militants killed in Kashmir’s Kulgam

first_imgSecurity forces killed two Hizbul Mujahideen militants in a pre-dawn operation in Kulgam on Wednesday. The police said Irfan Manzoor Bhat from Poniwah in Kulgam and Zahid Ahmad Mantoo from Ferripora in Shopian were surrounded by a joint team of the Army, the police and the CRPF in the Gopalpora area of Kulgam. “The operation was launched on credible inputs. Both the militants were killed and the bodies were retrieved from the site,” the police said.Mantoo, they said, was involved in planning and executing a series of attacks in the area. “He was involved in a case pertaining to the killing of three policemen at Batgund Shopian last year,” the police said.Bhat, who joined militancy recently, was “part of a militant group behind the killing of Abdul Majeed Dar from Shalipora in Kulgam”.In Poonch district in the Pir Panjal Valley, one solider was killed died and two others were injured in an “accidental” blast.An Army spokesman said the blast took place around 9.15 a.m. “during a training activity on a military post in the Mendhar sector”.“One soldier was critically injured in the incident and later succumbed to his injuries,” the Jammu-based Army spokesman said.last_img read more

Depression’s Tipping Point

first_imgSomeday, a smart phone app that asks what you’re feeling 10 times a day may be able to tell you if you’re edging closer to depression—and recommend that you seek preventive therapy or drugs. Scientists have discovered that how quickly someone bounces back from negative feelings, over hours or days, can predict whether that person is at risk of an episode of major depressive disorder.“The holy grail of depression epidemiology is that we want to intervene early to prevent people from having depressive episodes,” says social scientist Stephen Gilman of Harvard University, who was not involved in the study. “Where this work is headed is making an advance in that direction, toward early detection and therefore early intervention.”Researchers asked more than 600 people—some healthy and some with a diagnosis of depression—to track their emotions for 5 or 6 days. Ten times a day, at random intervals, a watch would beep and the subjects would record how strongly they identified with each of four emotions: cheerful, content, sad, and anxious. Six to 8 weeks later, participants filled out a more detailed questionnaire that rated their levels of clinical depression.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)By the end of the follow-up period, about 13% of the subjects had experienced a shift toward being more depressed, a number consistent with what would be expected in the general population. Trends in the daily mood records, the team discovered, could predict whether a previously healthy person would make that shift toward depression.Mathematically, it turns out, the shift from a healthy state to a depressed state resembles other so-called tipping points—moments of critical mass where a system, such as changes to Earth’s climate or a social trend—shift rapidly from one state to another. Theories on tipping points suggest that as a system nears a tipping point, it becomes less resilient.“In any system, if you push the system a little bit out of equilibrium, then the closer it is to the tipping point, the longer it takes to return to equilibrium after that perturbation,” explains Ingrid van de Leemput, an ecologist at Wageningen University and Research Centre in the Netherlands who led the new work. Indeed, the longer a patient took to recover from feelings of sadness and anxiety, the more likely they were to be more depressed by the end of the study, suggesting that they were closer to a tipping point between health and depression, her team reports online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The results matched with a mathematical model that the researchers had previously created to represent how emotional swings could signal an impending tipping point.“If a healthy person has an unpleasant call with their employer, they will be unhappy about it and dwell on it for 10 or 20 minutes but be done with it fairly quickly,” says psychiatry researcher Angelique Cramer of the University of Amsterdam, who collaborated with Van de Leemput. “What you see in people who are about to become depressed is that the next day, they are still sad about a phone call the day before.” Over time, she says, various symptoms of depression—negative mood, fatigue, and concentration problems, for example—can create a negative feedback loop that causes full-blown psychiatric disease. Cramer says the new research could lead to new ways for psychiatrists to track their patients’ well-being.“I think this could open up new avenues of research in many ways,” Gilman says. He’d like to see the work expanded to include more variables that are already known to increase depression risk—such as family history, previous episodes of major depression, and social factors. “Really what we want to know is where on the distribution of sadness and mood is the dividing line between a serious depressive episode and nondepression. And are there factors that can push people further from or towards that dividing line?”last_img read more

President’s Bioethics Panel Weighs in on How U.S. Should Handle Incidental Findings

first_imgJumping into the fray of a controversial topic, the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues released a report this afternoon on how to handle incidental findings, discoveries about an individual’s DNA and other health-related information that show up while hunting for something else. Such potentially problematic findings could include an individual’s risk of certain cancers, her chance of passing on a deadly disease to her children, or a chromosomal abnormality that could cause infertility. Incidental findings have garnered increasing attention and concern of late, especially in genetics, where broad genome scans are turning up unexpected information that no one knows quite what to do with.The bioethics commission, chaired by Amy Gutmann, president of the University of Pennsylvania, argues that physicians, researchers, and companies marketing DNA tests need to reframe how they think about all of this: While of course no one knows what will be buried in a given gene sequence, the fact that ancillary findings may be part of it should hardly be a surprise. Practitioners, the commission argues, should be ready to discuss this possibility with patients or research subjects. Gutmann penned an article in this week’s issue of Science summarizing the rationale behind the recommendations.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The commission left some of the stickiest details to others—which findings to return, for example, and whether biobanks have an obligation to supply incidental findings to the people whose DNA they store and share. In general, the commission recommended that researchers, physicians, and companies describe to potential recipients the findings that might arise; that recipients have a say in whether they get those findings back; and that research continue into incidental findings, to determine how common certain DNA variants, for example, might be in the general population. A full list of the recommendations can be seen here with the full report.The commission did suggest that researchers had the right to exclude from studies people who didn’t want potentially lifesaving findings returned to them and wondered whether researchers have a legal obligation to return certain findings and can be sued if they don’t.The new report is the latest in a growing stack trying to clarify the issue. This spring, a group of geneticists urged labs to actively look for incidental findings, such as certain genes predisposing to breast and ovarian cancer, and return those results whether people want them or not. That’s something the bioethics commission didn’t support. As the science that picks up incidental findings moves rapidly, the policymakers are doing what they can to keep up.last_img read more

Taking a Shot at a Tropical Killer

first_imgA vaccine against the disease leishmaniasis could save tens of thousands of lives every year. Now, scientists report that they have used snippets of DNA to spur mice to fight back against the parasites responsible for the illness, an approach they hope to soon begin testing in people.Leishmaniasis is caused by microscopic parasites of the genus Leishmania; some 20 different species can sicken humans. Leishmaniasis hits poor residents of tropical countries the hardest. The sandflies that spread the disease are silent and smaller than a mosquito. After a sandfly’s bite injects them into the body, Leishmania cells can attack the skin or mucous membranes, causing ulcers or disfiguring lesions. In an often lethal variety of the disease, they damage the liver, spleen, and bone marrow. Although the disease’s toll isn’t certain, estimates suggest there are about 1.3 million new cases and up to 40,000 deaths each year.Leishmania parasites are tricky foes, and so far no vaccine has received approval for use in humans. One challenge is that the parasites lay low inside our cells, out of reach of the antibodies triggered by most other vaccines. The key to eradicating these sheltered invaders, researchers suspect, is stimulating the immune cells known as T cells. Although two experimental leishmaniasis vaccines that use this strategy have undergone preliminary safety and effectiveness tests in people, the best method for enlisting T cells isn’t clear.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Immunologist Peter Walden of Charité University Medicine Berlin and colleagues decided to try a DNA vaccine, a type of vaccine that is good at inciting T cells. Such vaccines contain DNA strands coding for proteins from a pathogen. Cells in the vaccine recipient’s body absorb the DNA and start churning out the proteins—also called antigens—which alert the immune system and prime it to attack if a real infection occurs.First, the researchers had to choose the right antigens. They settled on five different proteins that vary little across Leishmania samples from a range of species found around the world. To determine whether the antigens galvanize human T cells, the team obtained blood samples from people in India and Tunisia who had recovered from the disease or had been exposed to it without getting sick. They found that portions of all five proteins sparked a response by T cells from the blood samples.The researchers’ final vaccine mixture, which they tested in mice, contained five kinds of DNA strands, each coding for all or part of one of the proteins. The vaccine stimulated the mice to produce defenses against leishmaniasis parasites, Walden and colleagues report online today in Science Translational Medicine. T cells from the vaccinated animals reacted vigorously to Leishmania antigens. To confirm that the vaccine helped the animals combat the invaders, the researchers injected the mice with cells of one Leishmania species. Three weeks later, mice that received the highest vaccine dose carried 94% fewer parasites in their liver than did mice that received a control shot. Although some parasites remained in the mice that received the largest dose, Walden says there weren’t enough of them to cause disease symptoms.“We are ready for human trials,” he says. The vaccine should provide protection against different human Leishmania species, he adds, because the selected antigens are the same across species.Immunologist Paul Kaye of the University of York in the United Kingdom agrees that the time for human trials has come. “There is every reason to believe that they should move forward as soon as possible,” says Kaye, who’s excited that there are now three vaccines to try in humans. Kaye and colleagues’ own vaccine candidate, which stimulates T cells with a harmless virus that carries sections of two Leishmania genes, has already undergone a safety study in people, but the results have not yet been published.“This is a significant advance,” says vector biologist Jesus Valenzuela of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in Rockville, Maryland. Walden’s group deserves credit for using human blood samples to identify the antigens, he says; other vaccine developers have used rodents.Leishmaniasis is one of the neglected tropical diseases for which research cash is hard to obtain. Still, Walden is hopeful that he and his colleagues will find financing for safety trials.last_img read more

Reader slideshow: Your most electrifying lightning photos

first_img By Meghna SachdevDec. 17, 2014 , 3:00 AM Bradley Kloostra A 2011 lightning storm in the Maasai Mara National Reserve in Kenya. Zuzana Pilková Eliot M Herman ‹› A summer storm in a small village in southwestern Slovakia in 2013. William Livingston A composition of 13 images taken between 11 p.m. and midnight during a July monsoon storm in Phoenix. Jonas Doerr Geoffrey Giller A summer thunderstorm in Bonn, Germany. Josef Brůna A reader’s backyard view of Tucson, Arizona, as another summer monsoon storm hits the city. A 2012 lightning strike in Rome. A summer thunderstorm in Bonn, Germany. center_img Arizona is world-renowned for its spectacular lightning displays. Here, lightning strikes the town of Tucson. Reader slideshow: Your most electrifying lightning photos Scott Matthews A reader on Florida’s Captiva Island looks west at lightning over the Gulf of Mexico in 2014. See more. Matt Zinn Lightning in Šumava National Park in the Czech Republic in 2013. A 2011 lightning storm in the Maasai Mara National Reserve in Kenya. Gianluca Casponi Lightning strikes Toronto’s CN Tower, the tallest free-standing structure in the Western Hemisphere. Geoffrey Giller Part of a time-lapse series, this photo was taken in front of the Center for Biofilm Engineering at Montana State University, Bozeman, in 2014. Scott Chimileski Jonas Doerr Last month, we asked you to send us your best photos of lightning—and boy, did you come through. From Arizona’s famous monsoon storms to lightning in Kenya’s Maasai Mara, here are 11 amazing, awe-inspiring, and electrifying photos of lightning taken by Science readers.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more