Half-time: Nottingham Forest 2 Fulham 1

first_imgRoss McCormack’s stunning free-kick gave Fulham hope of salvaging something after a disastrous start saw them concede twice inside 21 minutes. Both goals were disputed by the Whites, who claimed Britt Assombalonga handled the first and felt his second from the penalty spot came following a fair challenge by Shaun Hutchinson on Michail Antonio.Controversy aside, Nottingham Forest’s lead was harsh on bottom-of-the-table Fulham who had started well despite the ever-increasing pressure on manager Felix Magath.Home keeper Karl Darlow saved Tim Hoogland’s 20-yard shot and then just about stopped another long-range strike from McCormack.But Forest led when Assombalonga headed home Henri Lansbury’s free-kick and it was 2-0 when Assombalonga found the bottom corner from the penalty spot after Hutchinson appeared to have won a perfectly timed tackle on Antonio as he raced through on goal.But Fulham showed good spirit to pull a goal back when McCormack curled the ball over the wall and into the near post and they almost snatched an equaliser when Hugo Rodallega’s shot was cleared off the line by Eric Lichaj. Fulham: Kiraly; Bodurov, Hutchinson, Burn, Amorebieta; Hoogland, Parker, Fotheringham, Stafylidis; McCormack, Rodallega. Subs: Bettinelli, Eisfeld, Roberts, G. Williams, Hyndman, David, Kavanagh.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Overview: the Gauteng Stakeholder Workshop

first_imgThe Gauteng Stakeholder Workshop featured vibrant discussion about the existence of a country’s brand, the pros and cons of having one, and the best way to build a nation brand. It was widely agreed that all provinces should align with the overall nation brand message. From left to right, Sipho Mhlongo, from the Gauteng Growth and Development Agency, Brand South Africa chief executive Kingsley Makhubela, and Joburg Mayor Parks Tau address stakeholders at the Gauteng Stakeholder Workshop on 19 August 2015. (Image: CD Anderson)• Brand South Africa salutes Cowen High School for winning the Umhlobo Wenene FM debate competition • Brand South Africa invites stakeholders to contribute to insights on the South African Nation Brand • Young South Africans plan to stay at home • People and complexity: the missing ingredients in celebrity activism for Africa • Brilliant young minds at the CSIR Priya PitamberSouth Africans should concentrate on the positive: “We should be defined by what we are doing.” This was the message from newly appointed chief executive Kingsley Makhubela at Brand South Africa’s Gauteng Stakeholder Workshop, held in Sandton on 19 August.Sipho Mhlongo, group executive for trade, investment and regulatory enablement at the Gauteng Growth and Development Agency welcomed everyone to the discussion, held at the Gauteng Investment Centre. He said there are many great things happening in South Africa.One strong message about positivityMakhubela spoke about the importance of the provinces and the country aligning the overall brand message. “It’s important that provinces align [brand] messages and in the process of aligning it, not shoot ourselves in the foot.”He brought up instances in which South Africa had performed well – surviving the 2008 economic downturn and not having to bail out any banks; the rapid growth of the corporate sector since the mid-90s; and the good performance of the country’s academic institutions. He pointed out that six South African universities featured in the Top 10 list of the Times Higher Education (THE) Africa University Ranking.Makhubela recounted an anecdote: he got an opportunity to study overseas but one of his lecturers at a South African university advised him it was important to study in Africa, because that way the knowledge was able to remain on the continent.But South Africa also faced huge problems, he admitted, bringing up the issue of the local drug cocktail, nyaope. “We are going to lose a generation [to drugs],” he warned. “These sorts of social issues need to be addressed.” And one way to do this was to grow the economy.Big city lifeJoburg Mayor Parks Tau noted the importance of cities in identifying problems and finding solutions. The South African Cities Network, which represents most of the country’s main cities, acknowledges the large role big cities played in a country.It publishes a State of the City report about the work done. “Cities have become important pointers of development,” Tau stressed. “Cities have a role to play in finding solutions and resolving complex issues.”Joburg, the largest city not close to a river or sea, was a city of migrants and their ability to make it grow resulted in its success. “Forty percent of the people in Joburg now, are born outside of Joburg.”While it had made strides in investing in infrastructure, problems still existed, such as traffic congestion. The solution did not exist in building more roads, the mayor said. “We have to create alternatives because we cannot build our way out of problems… It’s about changing our mind-set.”He encouraged the audience to take advantage of the upcoming #EcoMobility campaign in October, aimed at getting people out of cars and using other modes of transport.South African Competitiveness Forum Dr Petrus de Kock, Brand South Africa’s general manager for research, spoke about the need to find a way to position the brand of the country. (Image: Priya Pitamber)The first session of the day, by Dr Petrus de Kock, the general manager for research at Brand South Africa, was about the South African Competitiveness Forum (SACF). The inaugural SACF took place back in 2013, born of a need to identify the work of positioning the brand of the country.In his presentation, De Kock described the SACF as a call “on all South Africans to play their part and engage in collaborative efforts to build a strong national reputation based on a globally competitive economy”.“As Brand South Africa, we have to understand the range and strengths of the nation to market it to the world and locally. Getting input from provinces can help with the messaging sent out,” he added.There was also opportunity to learn from where the country had succeeded and apply those lessons to challenges.A few discussion points emerged from the session, too, including the recent xenophobic incidents in the country and the response to them. De Kock said there was a lot of messaging in that period from the government and officials. Brand South Africa also studied the social response. “It doesn’t matter how small a group is, damage can be caused to the reputation,” De Kock observed.Other topics of discussion were whether it was possible to tackle negative perceptions of the country; whether it was a risk to build a nation brand; how the media could help in building a positive image of the country; the funding of small and medium enterprises; and how South Africa’s sense of pride was defined.“National pride is linked to inner emotions; it’s more than tourism and sport,” a speaker said.Nation Brand Master Class Brand South Africa acting chief marketing officer Sithembile Ntombela gave a Master Class on the Nation Brand. (Image: Priya Pitamber)Sithembile Ntombela, Brand South Africa’s acting chief marketing officer, conducted the Nation Brand Master Class. She said it was important build the nation, to find a nice narrative of South Africa. “We are selling our country,” she said.“The master class is about building a nation brand that at its core is unified through its diversity,” she noted in her presentation. “Building anything requires taking many pieces that work and fit together to make the bigger picture complete.”Provinces should align their messages with that of the country, Ntombela added, which would require a lot of planning. “We must relay true and relevant messages,” she said. “And promote a common sense of identity and pride.”A puzzle approach would work best because it could be used to “educate and guide key stakeholders in the intricacies of handling a nation brand, we created work that literally shows that everyone has a part to play in making our country a complete and competing nation”.Brazil, she said by way of example, was automatically associated with flair, the samba, and carnival; history was attached to Egypt, India and Peru; so too could South Africa create its unique stamp to sell to the rest of the world.Feedback on researchDe Kock shared the outcomes from the extensive research conducted by Brand South Africa, and it showed good news.“You can’t sell the brand of a country, without inside buy-in,” he reasoned. So the research started in the domestic arena, to find out what issues were on the minds of South Africans. It made use of a diverse national sample of 2 524 people.The Domestic Perceptions Research showed that while there were concerns among South Africans relating to crime, corruption and a lack of job opportunities, it also found that “citizens want to focus on solutions. And South Africans are willing to take action, rather than wait for someone else to do so.”Findings also showed that the majority of the population was under 35 and lived in urban areas; there was an increase in the middle class after 1994; 92% of the sample interviewed had a “good” or “strong” sense of pride; and many South Africans were aspirant that their children would live a better life than what they did.Country Messaging Framework Manusha Pillai, the Brand South Africa general manager of communications, talked about the Country Messaging Framework. (Image: Priya Pitamber)Brand South Africa’s Manusha Pillai, the general manager of communications, spoke about the National Development Plan (NDP) and how it could be tied into the country’s messaging framework.Pillars of the Country Messaging Framework mirrored the NDP and included tourism, culture and heritage, policy, people, brands, and investment and recruitment, all to be used to market South Africa.“Brand South Africa has been working with a various stakeholders from government, business and civil society to compile this Country Messaging Framework,” she said in her presentation, in which she described South Africans as having an energy and great problem-solving skills.last_img read more

OSU prof earns animal welfare designation

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest A veterinarian and assistant professor of animal sciences in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University (CFAES) has been named a Diplomate of the American College of Animal Welfare, the only swine veterinarian in Ohio to earn such a designation.In fact, Monique Pairis-Garcia, who is also an animal welfare specialist with Ohio State University Extension, is the first veterinarian at Ohio State to earn board certification in this relatively new veterinary specialty.The designation means that Pairis-Garcia can demonstrate detailed knowledge of and special competence in animal welfare across all species. This is significant, considering that the American Veterinary Medical Association identified animal welfare in June 2006 as “one of the top five critical issues affecting the veterinary profession both in the United States and globally.”“My entire career has been focused on animal welfare and behavior, so I’m very proud and excited to bring this honor to Ohio State, CFAES and the Department of Animal Sciences,“ Pairis-Garcia said. “I think this designation means a lot to the field of animal welfare science and the impact it will have on the farm.”Pairis-Garcia earned her Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree and a PhD in animal physiology from Iowa State University. She earned a scholarship from the American Association of Swine Veterinarians to take the exam for the board certification in animal welfare.Her research at Ohio State focuses on animal welfare issues for livestock species including timely and humane euthanasia, on-farm welfare assessments and audits, and alternative management practices to improve animal welfare on-farm.She also teaches CFAES undergraduate students and College of Veterinary Medicine veterinary students, focusing primarily on animal welfare and behavior in livestock industries.In addition to teaching and conducting research, Pairis-Garcia serves as a consultant, working with livestock producers to improve animal welfare on farms, including swine, dairy and poultry farms.For example, if an undercover video surfaces alleging suspected animal abuse or standards violations, Pairis-Garcia may be called to visit the farm to conduct an animal care audit. If violations are found, she works with producers to correct the animal care conditions.Her new board certification in animal welfare demonstrates her expertise in the area, which is a key focus for producers in maintaining their social license to produce food, she said.“I work to help producers provide an environment for their animals that optimizes their health and well-being,” Pairis-Garcia said. “When we recognize the role that animals have in our lives — whether it be the human-animal bond with pets or those relationships we have with livestock, it is our duty to take proper care of them when they are in our care.“It’s important for us to view animal welfare on many levels, such as ensuring the animal is healthy, has good nutrition and has the ability to express natural behavior.”Not only is it the right thing to do on a humane level, Pairis-Garcia said, but it’s also beneficial from a production standpoint — good animal welfare is key for quality food production.“Consumers care about where their food is coming from and want quality,” she said. “When an animal is stressed, it will result in a decrease in the quality of the meat.”To prevent that from happening, producers have to focus on proper animal handling, including remaining calm and quiet when they move animals, Pairis-Garcia said.Pairis-Garcia said she plans to use her new animal welfare board designation to “have a better seat at the table to open up the lines of communications between producers and consumers and help people have a better understanding of the livestock industry.”“As a veterinarian with this board certification,” she said, “I want to use this to improve the perception of the livestock industry and improve animal welfare on farms.”last_img read more

Woman languishing in Assam detention centre since 2010

first_imgWrong details received twice by the authorities have delayed the release of a woman lodged in one of Assam’s six detention camps for foreigners since 2010.Mamiran Nessa, lodged in western Assam’s Kokrajhar detention centre, should have been set free following the Supreme Court’s order in May to conditionally release all declared foreigners who have completed three or more years in detention.But officers of the Assam Police Border Organisation – it has been tasked with detecting and deporting foreigners or illegal immigrants since 1962 – said she could not be released as they “twice received details wrongly”.In July, the State government informed the Assembly that 335 out of the 1,145 declared foreigners across the six detention centres had spent three years or more in captivity. About a dozen had by then been released.More than 25 declared foreigners have been released and another 56 are to be released soon. Ms. Nessa is not among them.“Her case is in process. Police are hand-holding to submit the correct information,” Bhaskar Jyoti Mahanta, Special Director General of Police (Border), told The Hindu via message.Formalities fulfilled Guwahati-based lawyer Aman Wadud, who fights cases of poor declared foreigners pro bono, said all formalities according to the Supreme Court’s guidelines have been fulfilled in Ms. Nessa’s case. The formalities include two sureties of ₹1 lakh each and collection of biometric information.On Sunday, a team that included activist Harsh Mander, SC lawyer Prashant Bhushan and Mr. Wadud visited Ms. Nessa’s paternal home near Abhayapuri in Bongaigaon district. “When she was detained, her sons were 2 and 9 years old. Both brothers were brought up by their elder sister who was still a minor. She dropped out of school and worked as maid to raise them at their maternal uncle’s place,” Mr. Wadud said.Ms. Nessa was married in the 1990s to Jel Hussain of village Takakata near Baghbor in western Assam’s Barpeta district. Her family said she was randomly marked a doubtful voter in 1997 without any investigation.“She was subsequently declared a foreigner without any competent legal representation,” Mr. Wadud said.Ms. Nessa’s parents took her children home after her husband fell ill and was mostly confined to the bed. He could visit her in the detention centre only once in nine years. Mr. Hussain died two months ago due to cardiac arrest. Members of his family said his last wish was to see his wife out of jail and beside him.Ms. Nessa has not been told about her husband’s death yet.last_img read more

Woman paddlers settle for silver as men lose in semis

first_imgIndian women went down to the Singaporeans 0-3 in the team table tennis final on Friday, thereby having to settle for a silver medal at the Yamuna Sports Complex.However, the bigger disappointment was the men losing to England 1-3 in the team semi-final.The 2006 Commonwealth Games gold medallists will now face Nigeria in the bronze medal match on Saturday.The Singapore team had players of Chinese origin and two of their players are in the top-10. The highestranked Indian player was Mouma Das at 214. Mouma gave a tough fight to World No. 3 Feng Tiawei before losing 5-11, 3-11, 11-9, 7-11.World No. 5 Wang Yuegu easily defeated K. Shamini 11-7, 11-7, 11-5.Poulomi Ghatak took the first game 12- 10 against World No. 23 Li Jiawei. But the Singaporean came back strongly to take the next three games 11-7, 11-9, 11-5 to seal the gold medal for her side.Malaysia beat England 3-2 to seal the bronze.The defeat of the men’s team was unexpected. When Achanta Sharath won his first match against Liam Pitchford 11- 8, 11- 4, 11- 8, it seemed that another easy win was on the cards.In the second match Anthony Arputharaj came back from a deficit twice against Paul Drinkhall and had reached match point at 10- 6 in the fifth game. But then nerves and a controversial umpiring decision went against him. The break was all that Drinkhall needed as he sealed the contest 11- 8, 4- 11, 11- 5, 7-11, 12-10.With the match poised at 1-1, Subhajit Saha went down in straight games 4-11, 10-12, 8-11 to Andrew Baggaley. It put a lot of pressure on Sharath’s shoulders in the fourth match and for once he could not deliver.advertisementDrinkhall, who had beaten the world number 40 previously, repeated his feat and closed the deal with a 11-9, 11-5, 10- 12, 11-4 victory.last_img read more