McDonald’s (MCD) Q3 2020 earnings

first_imgShares of the company, which has a market value of $167 billion, have risen 9% so far this year.This is breaking news. Please check back for updates. – Advertisement – But international markets’ are taking longer to bounce back after being hit harder by pandemic restrictions, dragging down McDonald’s total same-store sales. The company reported global same-store sales declines of 2.2% for the quarter.And international markets will likely continue to weigh on McDonald’s business. England, Germany and France, some of the company’s largest markets, are re-imposing lockdowns as Covid-19 cases and deaths soar in those countries.Following the announcement of its third-quarter results, McDonald’s is scheduled to hold a virtual investor meeting.- Advertisement – McDonalds restaurant in Londons Oxford Street. Restaurants are only allowed to open for takeaway orders during the Englands second lockdown.Dave Rushen | LightRocket | Getty Imagescenter_img McDonald’s is expected to report its third-quarter earnings on Monday before the bell.Here’s what Wall Street is expecting, based on a survey of analysts by Refinitiv:Earnings per share: $1.90 expectedRevenue: $5.4 billion expectedIn October, the fast-food giant said its U.S. same-store sales turned positive, rising 4.6% in the third quarter. A promotion with rapper Travis Scott helped boost sales in September, fueling the chain’s highest monthly same-store sales growth in nearly a decade.- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

Jose Mourinho blames David Moyes

first_imgJose Mourinho believes Manchester United manager David Moyes is to blame for the saga surrounding star forward Wayne Rooney.Mourinho, speaking ahead of Chelsea’s clash with United on Monday, responded to questions about getting a fiery reception at Old Trafford because of his Rooney interest by putting the heat on Moyes.“They are against me?” Mourinho is quoted as saying in the Telegraph. “But I didn’t say [to Rooney] you will be a second-choice for me. And they are against me?“We are trying to get a player that a manager told ‘You will be a second option’ for him. We are not going for [Robin] van Persie.“They don’t have to be against me. If I say Ramires is a second option for me and he plays when Lampard is tired or injured, if someone comes here to get Ramires, nobody is upset When asked if Moyes was to blame for the ongoing transfer speculation around Rooney, Mourinho said: “Of course.” The Blues boss, though, did attempt to smooth over his abrasive comments as he prepares to face an early Premier League title test at United.“In every big team, I am not criticising, you have first options and second options, and those second options must be very good players,” he said. “Of course big teams must have second choices. Big players too. The point is if the players are happy to accept that situation.“It means they have a fantastic squad. Fantastic. I was playing against them last year. He [Rooney] was on the bench and he [Ferguson] was playing Van Persie, [Danny] Welbeck, [Shinji] Kagawa. The squad is amazing. So it is natural that some players have to be second-choice.”last_img read more

NIH moves to lift moratorium on animalhuman chimera research

first_img Email The National Institutes of Health (NIH) today announced that the agency soon expects to lift a moratorium on funding for controversial experiments that add human stem cells to animal embryos, creating an organism that is part animal, part human. Instead, these so-called chimera studies will undergo an extra layer of ethical review but may ultimately be allowed to proceed.Although scientists who support such research welcomed the move, some were left trying to parse exactly what the draft policy will mean. It is “a step in the right direction,” says Sean Wu, a stem cell researcher at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, who co-authored a letter to Science last year opposing the moratorium. But “we still don’t know what the outcome will be case by case,” he adds. However, some see the proposal as opening up research in some areas that had been potentially off-limits.At issue are experiments in which scientists introduce human pluripotent stem cells—cells that can potentially turn into any kind of tissue—into very early embryos of mice and other animals and then let the animals develop. Such experiments can be used to study human development, generate disease models, and potentially grow human organs for transplantation. But the idea of such human-animal chimeras has drawn public concern, and some scientists and ethicists worry that the experiments could produce, say, a supersmart mouse. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Last September, NIH abruptly announced it was suspending funding for studies that introduce human stem cells into animal embryos while the agency considered the ethical issues. Although NIH wasn’t yet funding such research, the pause put on hold future federal support for studies by researchers who want to create pig-human or sheep-human chimeras to generate organs for transplantation. NIH then held a workshop last November to gather input, where the general consensus was that these studies are scientifically valuable.According to two notices released today, NIH is proposing to replace the moratorium with a new agency review process for certain chimera experiments. One type involves adding human stem cells to nonhuman vertebrate embryos through the gastrulation stage, when an embryo develops three distinct layers of cells that then give rise to different tissues and organs. The other category is studies that introduce human cells into the brains of postgastrulation mammals (except rodent studies, which won’t need extra review).These proposed studies will go to an internal NIH steering committee of scientists, ethicists, and animal welfare experts that will consider factors such as the type of human cells, where they may wind up in the animal, and how the cells might change the animal’s behavior or appearance. The committee’s conclusions will then help NIH’s institutes decide whether to fund projects that have passed scientific peer review.NIH also wants to tighten its existing stem cell guidelines to prohibit studies that add human stem cells to primate embryos up to and including the blastocyst stage. (Current guidelines only prohibit adding human pluripotent cells to primate blastocysts.) And the agency wants to extend a current ban on breeding chimeric animals that might carry human eggs or sperm to include chimeras created with any kind of human cell, not just pluripotent stem cells.“I am confident that these proposed changes will enable the NIH research community to move this promising area of science forward in a responsible manner,” writes NIH’s associate director for science policy Carrie Wolinetz in a blog post today. In a call with reporters, she emphasized that the proposal “is not … a prohibition” on chimera research. “It is merely an extra look.”NIH is collecting comments on the proposed changes until 4 September, then hopes to issue a final policy and lift the moratorium by late January, Wolinetz said.Although some scientists are holding their applause, one sees the proposed policy as an indication that NIH is relaxing its chimera policy. Neuroscientist Steve Goldman of the University of Rochester in New York, who injects human stem cells into the brains of mice, notes that even experiments that put human cells into the brains of monkeys or other primates appear to be potentially permissible. Such studies, which could be useful for studying mental illnesses, “had been a very murky zone” until now, Goldman says. The proposed changes suggest “a much more permissive environment.”last_img read more