Kilawatt Technologies Becomes Member of the U.S Green Building Council

first_imgShelburne, VT-August 21, 2008- Kilawatt Technologies is pleased to announce that the company has joined the U.S. Green Building Council. The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) is an international non-profit organization working to advance buildings that are environmentally responsible, profitable and healthy places to live and work. USGBCs vision is to promote the Triple Bottom Line and pursues solutions that strengthen a healthy and dynamic balance between environmental, social and economic prosperity.Over the past few years, Kilawatt Technologies has seen a dramatic increase in the number of companies and organizations wanting their existing buildings to achieve certification in the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED). LEED certification applies to both new and existing buildings and focusing on the greening of existing commercial buildings would have a dramatic impact in cutting energy consumption and reducing harmful greenhouse gases. Currently, there are over 4.5 million commercial buildings in the United States, accounting for more than 60 percent of the nation’s electricity consumption.Kilawatt Technologies has developed a series of innovative conservation information products based on the company’s EnerSuite software that support organizations interested in achieving LEED certification. The company helps businesses conserve energy, lower costs and reduce greenhouse gases in large commercial and industrial buildings. For more information about Kilawatt Technologies, please call 802.985.2285 or visit www.kilawatt.com(link is external).####last_img read more

Colombia’s Antioquia Military Guard Captures Alleged Drug Gang Leader

first_imgIn 2000, Becerro allegedly participated in an attack that killed 21 police officers and eight civilians in the Department of Antioquia, according to the Defense Ministry. In Colombia, all of the business oligarchy grows marijuana and that is where their great wealth is from. Because there is no data on large plantings of vegetables, bananas, oranges, yucca, corn, beans, green beans, etc. etc. Becerro died on the bank of the Opogadó River in the Department of Chocó, the Defense Ministry said on March 9. Sword of Honor III is a continuation of Sword of Honor, which is a counterinsurgency effort launched by the Colombian Armed Forces in 2012 to confront and defeat illegal groups nationwide. Under the initiative, Soldiers and Troops combat terrorist attacks, dismantle landmines, and persuade guerrillas to demobilize and enroll in a government program that provides them with training so they can enter the workforce. The suspect was wanted on charges of manufacturing and possessing narcotics, aggravated murder, attempted aggravated murder, and aggravated conspiracy with the intent to commit extortion. His capture, part of the Sword of Honor III campaign, occurred less than two weeks after the Colombian National Army’s General José María Mantilla Artillery Battalion No. 18 seized 490 kilograms of marijuana that allegedly belonged to the National Liberation Army (ELN) in the Department of Arauca. Both were found in the in the Department of Gracias a Dios, which is on Honduras’ Caribbean border with Nicaragua; one was about 1,300 meters long, and the other 900 meters long. Soldiers destroyed them with explosives. The Honduran Army recently destroyed two clandestine airstrips used by narcotraffickers, raising the total number of strips disabled this year by the country’s security forces to more than 150, José Antonio Coello, a spokesman for National Interagency Security Force (FUSINA), said on March 9. Drug trafficking groups use Honduras as a transshipment point to transport cocaine and other illegal substances from South America to Mexico, the United States, and Europe. Nearly 90 percent of the cocaine that reaches the United States passes through Central America and Mexico, according to the United Nations International Narcotics Control Board. Honduran Army destroys two landing strips used by narcotraffickers By Dialogo March 19, 2015 Head of FARC’s 57th Front dies in shootout with Colombian National Army, Police Honduran security forces made significant progress in the fight against drug trafficking in 2014, seizing more than 40,000 kilograms of narcotics, including about 11,500 kilograms of cocaine, according to the government. Colombian National Army Troops and police officers recently killed José David Suárez, the leader of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia’s (FARC) 57th Front in a gun battle. Suárez, who was also known as “Becerro,” (calf in Spanish) was wanted for killing dozens of civilians during an attack in 2002. Head of FARC’s 57th Front dies in shootout with Colombian National Army, Police In 2000, Becerro allegedly participated in an attack that killed 21 police officers and eight civilians in the Department of Antioquia, according to the Defense Ministry. He was “the main drug dealer in northwestern Colombia” and had been wanted on charges of drug trafficking, terrorism, and attacks on civilians and security forces, according to the statement. He had been in the FARC for 36 years, and oversaw cocaine shipments to Central and North America. Both were found in the in the Department of Gracias a Dios, which is on Honduras’ Caribbean border with Nicaragua; one was about 1,300 meters long, and the other 900 meters long. Soldiers destroyed them with explosives. The suspect was wanted on charges of manufacturing and possessing narcotics, aggravated murder, attempted aggravated murder, and aggravated conspiracy with the intent to commit extortion. His capture, part of the Sword of Honor III campaign, occurred less than two weeks after the Colombian National Army’s General José María Mantilla Artillery Battalion No. 18 seized 490 kilograms of marijuana that allegedly belonged to the National Liberation Army (ELN) in the Department of Arauca. Troops with Antioquia’s Military Guard partnered with the Specialized Judicial Police Directorate against Organized Crime (PCO-CTI) and the Attorney General’s Office to capture the alleged leader of the La Esmeralda narcotrafficking gang in Antioquia Department, the Colombian National Army reported on March 7. The Honduran Army recently destroyed two clandestine airstrips used by narcotraffickers, raising the total number of strips disabled this year by the country’s security forces to more than 150, José Antonio Coello, a spokesman for National Interagency Security Force (FUSINA), said on March 9. Colombian National Army Troops and police officers recently killed José David Suárez, the leader of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia’s (FARC) 57th Front in a gun battle. Suárez, who was also known as “Becerro,” (calf in Spanish) was wanted for killing dozens of civilians during an attack in 2002. Honduran security forces made significant progress in the fight against drug trafficking in 2014, seizing more than 40,000 kilograms of narcotics, including about 11,500 kilograms of cocaine, according to the government. Sword of Honor III is a continuation of Sword of Honor, which is a counterinsurgency effort launched by the Colombian Armed Forces in 2012 to confront and defeat illegal groups nationwide. Under the initiative, Soldiers and Troops combat terrorist attacks, dismantle landmines, and persuade guerrillas to demobilize and enroll in a government program that provides them with training so they can enter the workforce. Honduran Army destroys two landing strips used by narcotraffickers Drug trafficking groups use Honduras as a transshipment point to transport cocaine and other illegal substances from South America to Mexico, the United States, and Europe. Nearly 90 percent of the cocaine that reaches the United States passes through Central America and Mexico, according to the United Nations International Narcotics Control Board. Troops with Antioquia’s Military Guard partnered with the Specialized Judicial Police Directorate against Organized Crime (PCO-CTI) and the Attorney General’s Office to capture the alleged leader of the La Esmeralda narcotrafficking gang in Antioquia Department, the Colombian National Army reported on March 7. He was “the main drug dealer in northwestern Colombia” and had been wanted on charges of drug trafficking, terrorism, and attacks on civilians and security forces, according to the statement. He had been in the FARC for 36 years, and oversaw cocaine shipments to Central and North America. Becerro died on the bank of the Opogadó River in the Department of Chocó, the Defense Ministry said on March 9. last_img read more

Roberts hails his late uncle and English football legend Cyrille Regis

first_img… Impact bigger than the gameLONDON, England (CMC) – Former Grenada international, Jason Roberts, has hailed his late uncle and English football legend Cyrille Regis as a pioneer who helped to battle a racist era in English football, and pave the way for other Black players in the game.Regis, who was born in French Guiana, passed away late Sunday at age 59 from a suspected heart attack, media reports here said yesterday.Roberts, the former Wigan Athletics and Blackburn Rovers star, said while he remembered Regis fondly as a great family man, he also had a massive impact on the development of the sport in Great Britain.“I just remember being very proud; proud that it was my uncle out on the pitch scoring those wonderful goals, proud that he was taking on the racists, and then just having time for his nephew,” said Roberts who made 12 appearances for the Spice Boys.“I also recall getting the sense that his impact was bigger than football. Every time I played football in the school playground, everyone wanted to be Cyrille Regis.“At that difficult time, he showed there was a place for us in the game. He made us believe in ourselves, so how many others did he influence? If uncle Cyrille could make it then why couldn’t we?”Regis was one of the outstanding Black players of the English game. He was capped five times by England and was a legend in the league, making 241 appearances for West Bromwich Albion and 238 for Coventry City between 1977 and 1991.However, the forward was often subject to racist abuse during his career, especially during the 70s, but overcame it to establish himself as one of the greats.Regis later managed West Brom following his retirement and also became a football agent, overseeing Roberts’ club record transfer to West Brom in 2000.Roberts said Regis had been responsible for reviving his career especially after the blow of being released by Chelsea.“It was never a player-agent relationship with me and him, it was just my uncle Cyrille advising me,” said Roberts.“That went right back to the start when I was released by Chelsea at the age of 16 and I fell out of love with football.“Cyrille was the person that picked me up again and he got me a trial at Hayes FC by convincing the coach Alan Christopher to give me a go. He always encouraged me to play at any level because you never know what might happen. How sage that advice was.”He added: “There’s no chance I would have had the belief in myself without Cyrille – from the inspiration of playing the game, to feeling there was a place for me in football, to having the belief that my ability could take me as far as I wanted to go.”Regis is survived by wife Julia and children Robert and Michelle.last_img read more