Unai Emery sends out message to Arsenal fans

first_imgArsenal was defeated 2-0 by Tottenham at last Wednesday’s Carabao Cup quarter-final and Gunners manager Unai Emery wants his players to impress with great performance at Emirates Stadium.Gunners defeat on Wednesday is the fourth time Arsenal is being defeated this season but their coach is optimistic that future matches will be impressive and that he still has trust in his players.Speaking the official club website, Emery said:“Each match is very important and when other teams are winning, they are not stopping, they’re improving. We need, after our defeat in Southampton, we need the three points. But I am happy with the players. I think at the Emirates we are continuing strongly and for example, in the last match against Tottenham on Wednesday, the spirit is very good.”Jadon SanchoMerson believes Arsenal should sign Sancho Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Borussia Dortmund winger Jadon Sancho might be the perfect player to play for the Gunners, according to former England international Paul Merson.“The players pushed and the players created the chances, and now we continue working on our efficiency to score. I trust in my players, I trust in our strikers, and tomorrow we need every supporter to help us.”“We are also going to push to give them a good match with energy, by playing well, and also with the three points in victory. We will play with a big respect for Burnley because they are a very good team with very good players.”“They played very well organised and also defensively they are very strong, and they have the personality to play with the long ball, the second action, a lot of crosses and have players with quality to score. This is a big match tomorrow.”last_img read more

Roccos Restaurant To Hold Breakfast With The Easter Bunny On April 13

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Rocco’s Restaurant (193 Main Street) is holding a Breakfast with the Easter Bunny on Saturday, April 13, 2019, from 10am to noon. There will be fun, photos, and baskets for bunnies of all ages.The Bunny Buffet Menu includes:Scrambled eggsSausageBaconPancakesHash brownsCerealYogurtFruit – watermelon, cantaloupe, grapesHomemade blueberry, chocolate chip, and corn muffinsRefillable beverages – coffee, tea, and soda.Non refillable beverages – Apple juice, orange juice, cranberry juice, grapefruit, pineapple juice, milk and chocolate milk.Call the restaurant at 978-657-7361 for pricing and reservations.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedPHOTOS: Wilmington Sons of Italy Holds Easter Bunny BreakfastIn “Photo of the Day”Wilmington’s Annual Easter Bunny Breakfast Set For April 14 (UPDATED)In “Community”Wilmington’s Annual Easter Bunny Breakfast Set For April 9In “Community”last_img read more

Beto ORourke Fell Short Of Expectations In The Texas Primary Was It

first_imgIn 2014, Wendy Davis, the Democratic gubernatorial candidate, won the statewide nomination handily but lost several border counties to Ray Madrigal, a candidate with no statewide name recognition who spent virtually no money on his campaign.And it was the same case with former Gov. Ann Richards in her 1994 re-election bid, when she faced Gary Espinosa in the Democratic primary. Richards won that race handily, with 78 percent of the vote. But her margins of victory were significantly lower in several border counties, a trend experts attributed to the Hispanic surname of her comparatively little-known opponent.“Virtually every time someone has run against a Latino surname for U.S. Senate or for governor in the past two decades, that person [with the Latino surname] has received about 20 percent of the vote,” said Manny Garcia, deputy executive director of the Texas Democratic Party.O’Rourke did pick up two key counties in the Rio Grande Valley — Hidalgo and Cameron — and he won 90 percent of the vote in El Paso, his home county on the border. He attributed Tuesday night’s results to his campaign’s whole-state approach.“If the focus were just running up the numbers in the primary or in certain parts of the state, that’s what you’d see from us. But we’re everywhere,” he said. “We’re everywhere along the border. We’ll continue to come back and I’m looking forward to our next visits.”O’Rourke acknowledged that the campaign has work to do in voter outreach. He said he’ll continue to work on that, with efforts that will include Spanish-language campaign events and media hits. Share Ivan Pierre Aguirre for The Texas TribuneU.S. Rep. Beto O’Rourke, with his wife Amy Hoover Sanders O’Rourke by his side, announces his intent to run for U.S. Senate against Senator Ted Cruz in front of a large crowd of supporters in El Paso on March 31, 2017. Photo by Ivan Pierre Aguirre/The Texas TribuneIn his bid to take down U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, Democrat Beto O’Rourke has visited 226 of Texas’ 254 counties, won glowing coverage from the national media and raised nearly $9 million. His Democratic primary opponents mostly campaigned on social media, and reported raising less than $10,000 combined. But as the votes rolled in Tuesday night, O’Rourke’s win wasn’t as massive as traditional indicators might have suggested. O’Rourke won less than two-thirds of the statewide vote. Sema Hernandez, a 32-year-old Houston activist and a self-described “Berniecrat,” picked up a surprising 24 percent. And she trounced O’Rourke in several key border counties with large Hispanic populations. It’s an outcome that’s not uncommon in statewide Democratic primaries in which, experts say, Hispanic-sounding surnames go a long way with Hispanic voters when name recognition among primary candidates is low.center_img He also said he wasn’t sure what role his surname played in his performance Tuesday. But several experts pointed to it as the main factor behind his loss to Hernandez in certain border counties.“The fact that Hernandez was able to do so well in border counties suggests that they’re voting on [name] alone,” said Brandon Rottinghaus, a political science professor at the University of Houston. “They’re voting based on a familiar Latino surname and not much else.”In low-information Democratic primaries, name matters when voters are choosing a candidate based on cues like gender and surname, said Victoria De Francesco Soto, a political science lecturer at the University of Texas at Austin who has studied Hispanic voters.  Those cues might also have played a role in the crowded Democratic race for governor. Former Dallas County Sheriff Lupe Valdez led her race, besting Andrew White with 43 percent of the vote to his 27 percent. But her share of the vote was even higher in the same border counties where O’Rourke faltered. In Webb County, for example, she won 59 percent to White’s 10 percent.“You only have a couple of cues when you go into the polling place … For a lot of folks, especially in the Democratic primary with a lot of Latinos voters, that coethtnic surname is a cue,” De Franceso Soto said. “That being said, it doesn’t have to be a death knell for Beto.”Unlike his Republican opponent Cruz, O’Rourke is still relatively unknown in Texas. A congressman from El Paso, he’s never run a statewide campaign and now faces the tough and expensive task of introducing himself to voters across the state.Texas hasn’t elected a Democrat to statewide office since 1994, and O’Rourke’s November hopes largely depend on voter mobilization efforts. But Cruz’s camp was quick to seize on his primary performance. Jeff Roe, a top Cruz adviser, pointed out that O’Rourke was under 50 percent in “lots of minority-majority areas.”Similarly, Davis’ 2014 performance on the border served as fuel for Republicans, including her Republican opponent Greg Abbott and his supporters, who quickly jumped on Davis’ losses in left-leaning South Texas to argue the border counties had rejected her candidacy as too liberal. (Davis picked up far more votes than Abbott in the same border counties she lost to Madrigal, and easily won those counties in the general election.)To be sure, Cruz is still the favorite in November. But political observers and Democrats say O’Rourke has plenty of time to make up for his lack of name ID in these areas, which serve as Democratic strongholds in the general election.Garcia, the Democratic Party leader, nodded to O’Rourke’s willingness to crisscross the state to introduce himself to voters.“It’s been very clear that Congressman O’Rourke has been deliberate about earning every single vote,” said Garcia. “We expect that he will continue to lead a positive campaign and talk to Democratic voters all across the state … He’s already proven he’s willing to do that.”last_img read more

New Book Highlights Difficulty of Being Black in Medicine

first_imgIt is well documented that Blacks are disadvantaged when it comes to healthcare outcomes. In fact, African Americans are more likely to suffer from serious illnesses such as diabetes, heart disease, prostate cancer, HIV, stroke and other deadly diseases. Even the life expectancy for Black men and Black women is less than their White counterparts, according to The New York Times.In addition to the health disadvantages that Blacks face, there are disproportionately fewer Blacks in the health profession. CBS News reports that Blacks make up 13 percent of the population, but account for only 4 percent of doctors nationwide. All of these topics are explored by Dr. Damon Tweedy in his new book Black Man In A White Coat: A Doctor’s Reflections on Race and Medicine. Tweedy is an associate professor of psychiatry at Duke University and explains in detail about how race disparity in the healthcare system negatively affects Black people. Tweedy appeared on the Sept. 8 episode of “CBS This Morning,” where he explained how his book takes a personal look at how being a minority can be bad for your health. In the interview he recalled a time when he did rotations at a voluntary clinic 90 minutes from where he went to medical school at Duke University. He quickly noted that all the patients were Black and none had health insurance. “It was pretty clear from the very beginning that we couldn’t provide the adequate care for them. They couldn’t afford the medications, the lab tests or any other treatments they needed,” Tweedy said. In a Sept. 6 interview with NPR’s Linda Wertheimer, Tweedy recalls experiencing humiliation when as a fledgling medical school student, a professor mistook him for a maintenance worker and was surprised that he was a student in the class. “And when I told him, you know, that I’m actually a student in his class, he looked at me very baffled, like someone was playing a joke on him, and just walked away. And so at the time, it was very hurtful and created a lot of self-doubt,” Tweedy said. However, Tweedy continued, he used that experience as fuel to show everyone that he belonged in medical school. According to the Charlotte Observer, Tweedy attended Duke University in 1996 on a full scholarship and said he experienced prejudice from patients and professors. He even was mistaken for being a Duke basketball player.  Tweedy’s story is also one of overcoming obstacles. Tweedy’s parents were blue-collar workers who didn’t have a high school education. Tweedy said he is in favor of increasing the number of Black doctors, and of physicians being involved in the political process, referring to retired Johns Hopkins surgeon Dr. Ben Carson. jhunter@afro.comTwitter: @hunter_jonathanlast_img read more

Tribal war drove human evolution of aggression

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. “Once the probability 0.6 is fixed in the population, a value of 0.7 is more likely to invade than a decrease to 0.5. So it is true that there is gradual, step-by-step evolutionary process causing the increment in the tendency to go to war, but this might take a long time. Our model is a bit less idealized than this, but it works approximately like that.”However, as you might expect, there is a downside to belligerence and bravery. While both these traits offer advantages during war for a tribe, both traits are also considered high-risk social behaviors. An individual possessing the traits has a greater chance of dying, which means the tribe not only loses a warrior, but the death also opens a spot for another male to appropriate the first male’s reproduction-enhancing resources. This trade-off leads to another question: if an individual himself does not benefit from belligerence and bravery, but only his tribe, why would humans evolve this altruistic trait? The scientists explain that the answer is kinship: a human will take the risk of dying for close relatives since they carry very similar genetic material, and will pass that genetic material on for him. “The mathematical analysis in fact shows that the selective pressure on belligerence and bravery is substantially driven by the benefits of conquest that accrue on the relatives of the belligerent and/or brave males within their group, showing that kinship ties shape warfare in our model,” Lehmann said. “Evolutionary biologists refers to this as ‘indirect’ transmission of genes because the individual expressing the trait does not reproduce (it’s in fact costly for him), but other individuals from the group who survive may indirectly benefit from the behavior of the possibly dead brave male.”Lehmann added that the genetic relatedness concept stems from the late Bill Hamilton of Oxford University, one of the greatest evolutionary biologists of the 20th century. Prior to Hamilton, the British geneticist J. B. S Haldane also hit upon the idea in a famous anecdote. When asked by a friend at a pub whether he would risk his life to save a drowning man, Haldane scribbled some notes on a napkin and answered, “No, but I would do it for two brothers or eight cousins.” The same idea holds true for the altruistic traits of belligerence and bravery, but Lehmann and Feldman were surprised to find just how large a group could show the kinship connection.“[The greatest significance of this study is] showing that the selective pressure on belligerence and bravery may remain substantial even in groups of large size (approximately 50 males and 50 females),” Lehmann said. “This is interesting because it is usually assumed that individually costly, altruistic traits (of which belligerence and bravery are only particular examples) would only be able to evolve in very small-sized groups, like the nuclear family or something only slightly bigger. The demographics behind warfare may explain the evolution of altruism in larger groups than have usually been assumed in more standard biological scenarios aimed at understanding the evolution of altruism.”Among other interesting results of the model is the finding that bravery is even more highly desired than belligerence, since bravery has advantages when tribes are on both the offensive and defensive sides. On a different note, even though the model describes genetic inheritance, the scientists say that these traits could also be inherited culturally (through nurture rather than nature). Today’s modern wars between large states, as opposed to tribal wars, don’t follow the same model. Rather, one of the most common explanations is that modern wars are fought when the benefits outweigh the costs, in a fairly rational way. But do the results of this study, showing that we are all offspring of conquerors, suggest an underlying primitive explanation for why we fight “rational” modern wars? Though it may be an intriguing idea, Lehmann doesn’t think so.“I don’t think that our study helps in one way or another to understand war between states, but there are many interesting and relevant theories for understanding such wars that have been developed by economists and political scientists,” he said.More information: Lehmann, Laurent and Feldman, Marcus W. “War and the evolution of belligerence and bravery.” Proceedings of The Royal Society B. doi:10.1098/rspb.2008.0842.Copyright 2008 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Explore further Citation: Tribal war drove human evolution of aggression (2008, September 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-09-tribal-war-drove-human-evolution.html Imitation breeds war in new evolutionary theory These reproduction-enhancing resources prompted our ancestors to fight in order to pass down their family genes. With war as a driving force for survival, an interesting pattern occurred, according to a new study. People with certain warrior-like traits were more likely to engage in and win wars, and then passed their warrior genes down to their children, which – on an evolutionary timescale – made their tribe even more warrior-like. In short, humans seem to have become more aggressive over time due to war’s essential benefits.In their study, Stanford University scientists Laurent Lehmann and Marcus Feldman have presented a model showing that aggressive traits in males may have evolved as an adaptation to limited reproductive resources. Because tribal war serves as a method for appropriating territory and women, war may have driven the evolution of these traits. The scientists use the term “belligerence” to refer to a trait that increases the probability that the person’s tribe will attack another tribe. Likewise, “bravery” refers to a trait that increases the probability that the person’s tribe will win a war, whether they have attacked or are being attacked. Lehmann and Feldman demonstrate in their model that belligerence and bravery continue to genetically evolve through the male line. When one tribe conquers another, males in the conquering group mate with females in the conquered group, and pass the warrior traits to their male offspring.“Suppose that for some reason or another each individual in a population is committed through genetic or cultural influence to go to war with probability 0.5,” Lehmann told PhysOrg.com. “Now in one group, an individual appears that is willing to go to war with probability 0.6, which, statistically, will increase his group to go to war. The genes or cultural variants causing individuals to go to war with probability 0.6 may then invade the population (because their bearer and their group members will produce more offspring and send more genetic or cultural variants in the next generation than individuals expressing the probability 0.5 to go war, and on average they will transmit to their offspring the tendency 0.6 to go to war), but this will take several generations, especially if belligerence or bravery is genetically determined. Wars are costly in terms of lives and resources – so why have we fought them throughout human history? In modern times, states may fight wars for a number of complex reasons. But in the past, most tribal wars were fought for the most basic resources: goods, territory, and women.last_img read more