David Reynolds named deputy commissioner of BISHCA

first_imgDavid Reynolds, Senior Policy Advisor for Health to United States Senator Bernie Sanders, will join BISHCA as Deputy Commissioner of Health Care Administration.  The Health Care Administration oversees hospital budget review and the certificate of need process, maintains health care data bases, oversees quality reporting by hospitals and health insurers and supervises external claim reviews.  HCA is also responsible for liaison between BISHCA and the Green Mountain Care Board.  Reynolds will begin work at BISHCA in early December. ‘David Reynolds brings a rare combination of policy knowledge and on the ground experience in the delivery of health care to our work implementing health care reform in Vermont,’ said BISHCA Commissioner Steve Kimbell.  ‘I am very glad to have him join our team at BISHCA,’ he continued. David Reynolds holds a doctorate in Health Policy from the University of Michigan and brings to his new position extensive career experience in health care programs and policy and in federal and local government.  He is a resident of St. Johnsbury. BISHCA 11.8.2011last_img read more

Oman, Israel discuss ‘recent developments’ after UAE deal

first_imgOman’s foreign minister spoke to his Israeli counterpart on Monday, Muscat said, the first contact since Israel normalized ties with the United Arab Emirates last week.Yusuf bin Alawi subsequently spoke with a top Palestinian official, Oman added.The Israel-UAE deal, announced by US President Donald Trump on Thursday, is only the third such accord Israel has struck with an Arab country, and raises the prospect of similar deals with other pro-Western Gulf states. Also Monday, bin Alawi spoke with senior Fatah official Jibril Rajub, who expressed his “appreciation of the role of the sultanate and its balanced and wise policy towards Arab issues and, foremost, the Palestinian question,” according to Oman’s foreign ministry.The Palestinian Authority has voiced its “strong rejection and condemnation” of the Israeli-Emirati deal. Topics :center_img Bin Alawi and Israel’s Gabi Ashkenazi spoke via telephone about “recent developments in the region,” Oman’s foreign ministry said on Twitter.Muscat had already expressed its support for the deal, and bin Alawi told Ashkenazi that Oman “clearly reaffirms its position calling for a comprehensive, just and lasting peace” in the Middle East.Bin Alawi also called for a “resumption of the peace process in order to satisfy the legitimate rights of the Palestinian people who aspire to an independent state.”While Oman and Israel do not have formal diplomatic relations, there have been several contacts between the two states, including in 2018, when the late sultan Qaboos received Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Muscat.last_img read more

Is Pot Losing Its Buzz in Colorado?

first_imgFortune.com 1 July 2016Family First Comment: Interesting…“Now, as citizen groups attempt to put the brakes on the growing industry, a heated debate has emerged about the drug’s societal impact. Doctors report a spike in pot-related emergency room visits—mostly due to people accidentally consuming too much of potent edible pot products. Police face new cartel-related drug operations. Parents worry about marijuana being sold near their homes and schools. And less affluent communities like Pueblo struggle with the unintended consequences of becoming home to this emerging and controversial industry.”For months, Paula McPheeters and a handful of like-minded volunteers have spent their weekends in grocery-store parking lots, even in 95° F heat. Sitting around a folding table draped with an American flag, they asked passing shoppers to sign a petition. Inevitably a few sign-wielding young protesters would show up to argue that McPheeters’s group was dead wrong. With the two sides often just yards away from each other, shouting matches erupted. “We’re peaceful people,” one woman yelled. “You’re drugged out,” countered an angry man. Threats and phone calls to police became the norm.The wedge dividing the people of this small blue-collar city of Pueblo, Colo.? Legal marijuana.Colorado gave the green light to recreational marijuana back in 2012, when it passed a law to make nonmedical pot sales legal starting Jan. 1, 2014. But now opposition is rising in communities across the state. Colorado has become a great social experiment, the results of which are still not clear. “The jury is still out as to whether this was a good idea,” says Colorado attorney general Cynthia Coffman.What’s undeniable is this: Legal marijuana is in high demand in Colorado. Only three other states—Alaska, Washington, and Oregon—plus the District of Columbia currently permit recreational adult use of cannabis. (It’s legal for medical use in ­another 19 states.) Of that group, Colorado led the way in 2015 with $996.5 million in licensed pot sales—a 41.7% jump over 2014 and nearly three times the figure in Washington State. Recreational sales made up nearly two-thirds of the total. Now, as citizen groups attempt to put the brakes on the growing industry, a heated debate has emerged about the drug’s societal impact. Doctors report a spike in pot-related emergency room visits—mostly due to people accidentally consuming too much of potent edible pot products. Police face new cartel-related drug operations. Parents worry about marijuana being sold near their homes and schools. And less affluent communities like Pueblo struggle with the unintended consequences of becoming home to this emerging and controversial industry.“I’m getting calls now from people who voted for legalization thinking it wouldn’t affect them,” says Kevin Sabet, co-founder of national antimarijuana legalization group Smart Approaches to Marijuana. “They’re surprised to see these are sophisticated businesses opening up next to their schools selling things like marijuana gummy bears. And they’re angry.”READ MORE: http://fortune.com/pot-marijuana-colorado/last_img read more