In Focus: Touch World Cup – Germany

first_imgIn the lead-up to the 2015 FIT Touch World Cup, we catch up with Bob Kalman from Germany as they embark on their second World Cup campaign.How big is Touch in Germany?Touch Germany now has over 400 active players and this is growing on a daily basis.The national champions for 2014 are “TiB Berlin” who went through the 2014 season with an unbeaten record against German teams.Who is a player from Germany that is one to watch out for at the 2015 TWC?Touch Germany will be missing a few key players from the previous European Championships in Wales in 2014. However the strength of the Germans always has been the girls. This year, captain Yvonne Giesen will return as well as Svenja Strotta, Lena Dietz and Ute Kohlheim, making up some of the best ladies in continental Europe.Germany are currently sending one team (Mixed Open) to the 2015 TWC, what are your goals for the event?Germany has several strong veteran players in the team for 2015, but also several players who will be making their international debuts.  The goal of the German squad this year is to turn the rookies into veterans so that they can take back to their local clubs all the experience that comes with playing in Oz.What are you most looking forward to for your trip to Australia?I will be traveling with a 2 year old toddler on the 30 hour trip over to Australia, so one thing that I am personally NOT looking forward to is the flight over, but the whole team is looking forward to the tournament and learning as much as they can whilst they are out there.If you want to keep in touch with Germany in the lead-up to the 2015 TWC, visit the following:WebsiteFacebookRelated LinksGermany: 2015 TWClast_img read more

TFA Reaffirms Commitment to Inclusion and Deaf Sports Australia (DSA)

first_imgDate:  22 and 23 AugustLocation: DarwinVenue: Darwin High SchoolTime:  22/8 – 10am – 12.00pm23/8 – 8:00am – 9:30am. ACTNT Hearing impairments currently affect one in five Australians with that number expected to increase in coming years.The commitment by TFA to those who may describe themselves as deaf, hard of hearing, hearing impaired or a cochlear implantee, is another example of how the sport aims to improve the inclusiveness and experience for participants in the sport. As well as creating an environment where persons with a hearing impairment feel comfortable participating and be a part of the Touch Football community.Against this backdrop, Touch Football Australia (TFA) also announced this week the re-signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with Deaf Sports Australia (DSA).The purpose of the MOU is to increase the number of participants who are deaf or hard of hearing in Touch Football, through: community based initiatives; the creation of specific material for hearing impaired persons; as well as the identification of development pathways in Touch Football.For further information, please visit www.touchfootball.com.au or www.deafsports.org.au.Head down to the above venues and witness first-hand something you don’t see every-day: a completely silent Touch Football match with all participants wearing ear muffs and no verbal communication allowed. Date: 24 August, 2017Location: CanberraVenue: Reconciliation Park, Parkes ACTTime: 12.00am – 2.00pm TFA is again proud to support Hearing Awareness Week with a focus on the fragility of hearing health and ways to protect it. Hearing Awareness Week (20-26 August) aims to eliminate the stigma, isolation, lack of work opportunities, and the associated health issues to improve the overall quality of life for people with deafness or hearing impairment.The first community initiative for TFA and Deaf Sports Australia in 2017 is the annual Silent Sports Challenge. The event this year will be held across two key locations, Canberra and Darwin; both centres will host Touch Football events to raise awareness of inclusion and encourage a place on the touch football field for everyone, as follows.last_img read more