No transgression of the law

first_img In the incident being debated, it must be borne in mind that no transgression of the law was incurred by the bowler who was entitled to run out the batsman. The ball was in play, the dismissal was lawfully executed and no warning, which is regarded as a convention, was necessary. An appeal was made, the decision was correct; the match was lawfully won and accepted without any criticism or inappropriate comment from the defeated captain, which would in itself be an offence. These are the salient points which are most relevant to the issue, and the frivolous accusation of not adhering to what is only a custom is unfounded and of secondary importance. The only option available to overcome the decision was for the captain to seek the permission of the umpire for him (the captain) to withdraw the appeal in an act of sportsmanship. Not choosing to do so must not be construed as not playing the game within its spirit, and the question to be asked is, how can an incident be regarded as disgraceful and unbelievable when there was adherence to the relevant law? To regard it as such, as some critics have described it, is not only ludicrous but demonstrates a total disregard for logic and an example of one’s erroneous interpretation of the law. It is well known that the only reason why a non-striker leaves the popping crease before the delivery, or an athlete leaves his mark before the starter’s gun goes off, is to gain an unfair advantage or to get a ‘jump start’, as some would say, and this the law regards as unfair and therefore incurs a penalty when transgressed. What I consider as dishonest and unacceptable is that it is permissible for a batsman to challenge the decision on being given out caught behind by the wicketkeeper off an obvious clean catch of which he, the batsman, is cognisant that he had played and must have felt and heard. Under the Television (TV) Replay System, requesting the umpire for a review is not regarded as against the spirit of the game, but in my opinion it is tantamount to an umpire’s decision being disputed. I also regard it as against the spirit of the game when the wicketkeeper intentionally appeals for a catch in an effort to mislead the umpire and to avoid a wide being signalled. In the highest format of the game, it is replete with instances where the spirit of the game is being ignored and considered trivial, such as employing time-wasting tactics to avoid another over being bowled, an experience of all umpires. It is reported, in the recent case, that the standing umpire sought confirmation as to the seriousness of the appeal before the decision was made. This I regard as inappropriate as the fielding side had already signalled their position by appealing. This could give the impression that the umpire is exhibiting a lack of neutrality and partiality, which are among his personal attributes and an indication also that the spirit of cricket has priority over the breaching and application of the law. In the final analysis, it is unquestionable that if cricket is to maintain the high reputation that it enjoys among sports, adherence to its laws, and display of sportsmanship when depending on the circumstances, as well as respect for those participating are the objectives which must be the primary aim of those involved. • John (Johnny) Gayle is a retired Test cricket umpire and cricket administrator. According to the internationally recognised and definitive guide to the interpretation and application of the laws of cricket and which is approved by the MCC and adopted by the ICC, the spirit of the game involves your opponents, your captain and team, the role of the umpire and the traditional values of the game. It is also mentioned that to dispute an umpire’s decision by word, action, or gesture, to indulge in cheating and to distract an opponent while batting are offences against the spirit of the game and brings it into disrepute. Among the 13 offences in the laws which are indicative of injustices is the ‘Batsmen Stealing a Run’ listed under that significant law Fair and Unfair Play (Law 42). Leaving your crease before the delivery is a tactic frequently used. It is an unfair strategy and a violation of the law which must have precedence over any other consideration. Simultaneously, it is permissible for the bowler to run out the non-striker before the delivery. This revised law (Law 38) now emphatically states that “Either batsman is out run out if at any time while the ball is in play he is out of his ground and his wicket is fairly put down by the action of a fielder.” Wasting tactics The circumstances surrounding the dismissal of the non-striker which allowed the West Indies Under-19 team to be victorious in the recent ICC World Cup has generated much controversy, with the International Cricket Council’s (ICC) chief executive Dave Richardson also giving his personal view on the matter. It has prompted me in my capacity as a retired umpire and an enthusiast of the game to express my view on the dispute as it relates to the playing of cricket within its spirit, which is the responsibility of the captain and the application of the law by the umpire. Various interpretations seem to exist of what is meant by the spirit of cricket. In the revised edition of the textbook Cricket Umpiring and Scoring, it is clarified in the preface – The Preamble – The Spirit of Cricket. Umpire’s decision Lawfully executedlast_img read more

Follow The Trace | Encouraging signs, but!

first_imgThe narrow one-nil defeat of the senior Reggae Boyz in their friendly international against the USA was a pivotal result from a pivotal performance, at a pivotal time, in yet another crucial rebuilding cycle. Playing away from home, in cold, unfamiliar and unfriendly conditions on an artificial surface, the overall performance was encouraging from what was a young and inexperienced Jamaican team. There would have been precious little time for head coach Theodore ‘Tappa’ Whitmore and his technical staff to develop any kind of meaningful team chemistry and understanding amongst this group of players. There was, however, good dedication and heart, desire and commitment shown by the team Fundamentally, the team kept its shape and discipline throughout a testy 90 minutes of football as the USA understandably dominated possession in their backyard. Certainly, the new-look centre-half duo of Damian Lowe and Sergio Campbell stood tall in thwarting several threatening USA attacks. Offensively, Corey Burke was a typically tireless worker, and despite the possession disparity between the two teams, Burke did manage to create a few anxious moments for the American defence, and certainly keeps himself relevant as a credible option for the future. MIDFIELD ISSUES Amid all that positivity though, there remains the perennial problem of our midfield lacking personality, leadership and creativity. The midfield play was for the most part disjointed and almost non-existent. Mysteriously, Whitmore continues to assemble a midfield without genuine playmakers or even players with the basic technical skills needed to protect and maneouvre the football, and the vision to use it effectively. On the few occasions when the ball found its way into the Jamaican midfield, it was treated like the proverbial ‘hot potato’ that none of our players wanted to hold onto. This midfield issue is critical and must be urgently addressed by the coaching staff. Again, it comes down to the meticulousness of the scouting process. The coaching and technical staff must deliberately seek out players at home or abroad with the specific skill set that team so desperately needs. If returning to the common hunting ground in England fails to deliver the quality needed, then the conscious decision must be made to groom and develop some midfielders. Failing to do this will see our defenders and goalkeeper continuing to come under severe and inordinate pressure, while our forwards will continue to be starved of adequate and competent service For too long, Jamaican scouting locally and overseas has been bereft of strategic specificity. We’ve had a midfield creativity crisis ever since the retirement of Whitmore himself, and with the midfield being the fulcrum of every football team, ignoring this particular crisis will ultimately lead to the team’s demise. Another major disappointment coming out of the USA game was the limited minutes afforded to the young strike force of Shamar Nicholson and Jourdaine Fletcher. From my count, Nicholson and Fletcher got a combined two touches in the less than 10 minutes they were on the park. Again, Whitmore missed a trick and should have given these two rising stars more playing time in what was a meaningless friendly fixture against a below-strength USA team. All in all, coach Whitmore has a platform from which to launch. One can only hope that he sticks with the core of these players, and stop being such a coward going forward, in terms of giving more of the younger players meaningful playing time. The aim going forward must remain finding that elusive balance in our team composition. The USA game and the upcoming fixture against Honduras should help Whitmore and his technical team in the making of some crucial selection decisions. It would also be great if somewhere along the way, a game or two could be played inside the National Stadium. But maybe that’s asking for too much. As the process continues, there are definitely some encouraging signs, but there is still a lot of work to be done.last_img read more

SA pay-TV playing field opens up

first_imgIcasa said in a statement that it hoped increased competition would boost job creation, promote the involvement of previously disadvantaged people in the sector, ensure a wider range of content and increase access to affordable subscription television services. Multichoice South Africa chief executive Nolo Letele welcomed the move, saying that competition would attract investment in the broadcasting industry and the South African economy in general. “It will also stimulate growth of the pay television market and ensure that consumers are provided with choice and more diversity of content,” Letele said on their company website. Business Day reports that Telkom Media, a subsidiary of fixed-line telecoms provider Telkom, has committed over R7-billion over the next 10 years to developing its platform, while On Digital Media – whose shareholders include the African subsidiary of European satellite services company SES – have secured over R1-billion to launch their service. e-SAT, which is part of JSE-listed Hosken Consolidate Investments, did not disclose what amount they would invest in their service. HCI also owns the country’s only free-to-air channel, e.tv. According to Screen Africa, Walking on Water aims to offer a wide range of programmes based on “Christian lifestyle principles” via satellite. Eighteen companies originally applied for licences when the process began in August 2006. Three applicants, including a joint venture between the South African Broadcasting Corporation and state-owned signals provider Sentech, later withdrew their applications. The regulator gave no reasons as to why the other 10 applications were turned down, saying only that details would be released within the next three weeks.last_img read more

Maharashtra Budget session curtailed to ease pressure on police

first_imgTo ensure tight security in the city and adequate police deployment across the city in wake of the current tension on the India-Pakistan border, the Budget session of the Maharashtra legislature was curtailed on Thursday. Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis said in the Assembly that at least 6,000 police personnel are deployed in the Vidhan Sabha presmises during the session. “There is tension at the border and at this time it is important to maintain internal security. Mumbai being the financial capital of the country, the vigil needs to be tighter. There is no need to panic, but we must take extra precaution,” said Mr. Fadnavis. He informed the Assembly, that in a meeting [all party? or CM only?] held with security establishments [when?], it was observed that police required extra force to ensure adequate deployment. “This was conveyed to leaders of all political parties and it was unanimously decided to curtail the session. This decision has been taken to ensure the release of extra police force and make them available to provide security cover at other areas,” he said, reiterating that there is no need to panic. Mumbai police intelligence sources had told The Hindu on Wednesday that the city was put on high alert since the air strikes. Vote on accountThe Assembly approved the vote-on-account which has budgetary provisions for four months of the next financial year (April to July this year), without any debate.Leader of Opposition Radhakrishna Vikhe-Patil and Nationalist Congress Party (NCP) MLAs Ajit Pawar and Jayant Patil said they were tabling their respective speeches on the interim budgetary provisions on the floor of the House. The appropriation Bill and vote-on-account were subsequently passed by a voice vote. The House was then adjourned for an hour and a meeting of the State cabinet was also held.Earlier, at the start of the day, NCP legislator Jitendra Awhad urged Mr. Fadnavis to move a motion that the State along with rest of the country stood firmly behind the armed forces and Wing Commander Abhinandan Varthaman, who was captured by Pakistan after an air combat on Wednesday. Accordingly, a one-line resolution was unanimously passed with the Assembly expressing solidarity with armed forces and demanding release of Wg. Cdr. Varthaman.last_img read more

Many in Odisha denied PDS rice due to non-seeding of Aadhaar

first_imgThe ‘One Nation, One Ration Card’ scheme seems to be not working in favour of many in Odisha, according to a survey that found that hundreds of people have not been provided rice through the Public Distribution System for two months due to non-seeding of Aadhaar. The study also found that exclusion due to Aadhaar linking is more prevalent in tribal areas.A study of 63 villages in Nabarangpur district found that out of 1,271 people in 272 households surveyed, 435 have not been provided PDS rice for September and October due to non-seeding of Aadhaar. Out of these, 35% are children between 0-10 years of age.The survey was conducted during the first week of October by the Odisha chapter of the National Right to Food Campaign, an informal network of organisations and individuals working on right to food issues.PDS rice for two months was distributed in Kalahandi-Bolangir-Koraput area from September 20 to 30, according to Sameet Panda of the food campaign.Ineligible personsOut of 272 families, there were 17 households having a total of 50 members who have not received grain for September and October as none of the family members were seeded in PDS-Aadhaar.There are 255 such families where Aadhaar of one or more family members has not been seeded. There are 385 persons across these 255 households who have not been seeded into Aadhaar, so their names have been eliminated.The survey found that there are 17 persons who are ineligible. They include those dead; female members married outside; and not available in the village.Out of 435 persons whose Aadhaar has not been seeded, 185 persons don’t have Aadhaar. The survey team met those who have applied for Aadhaar several times but have not received it so far, said Mr. Panda.There are 228 persons who have an Aadhaar number but it has not been seeded yet. Out of them, 72 persons have submitted their Aadhaar in the gram panchayat but they don’t know why it has not been seeded. There are 17 such persons whose Aadhaar number is reflected in the PDS card but their name has been deleted.last_img read more