Gor’s Kerr named Coach of the Month for June

first_img0Shares0000Gor Mahia Dylan Kerr receives an award from Fidelity Insurance representative Elizabeth Wamae. Photo/RAYMOND MAKHAYANAIROBI, Kenya, July 24 – Gor Mahia head coach Dylan Kerr was on Tuesday feted as the June Fidelity Insurance Coach of the Month after guiding the Kenyan Premier League champions to five wins that month.Kerr was unanimously voted by the Sports Journalists Association of Kenya (SJAK) Football Commission after going unbeaten that month, winning all the five games played scoring 15 goals, and conceding only one to collect the maximum 15 points. With the award, the Briton was awarded a trophy and Sh75,000 from title sponsors Fidelity Insurance.Fidelity Insurance’s Elizabeth Wamae signing the cheque. Photo/RAYMOND MAKHAYAKerr, who was caught by surprise acknowledged the brilliant work being done by his backroom staff and his players in general.“Honestly when I came here I did not know that it was me getting this award. I have to say thank you to the technical staff who have been amazing during this period. They have helped me a great deal, that is why we are here,” the Briton said.“My players too have been amazing, and I can’t take that away from them. No matter who is selected, they have done a brilliant job and that is why we are getting these results,’ Kerr said,” he added.Gor started the month with a 4-0 drubbing over Wazito FC, then thrashed Nzoia Sugar 3-1 in Kisumu.Gor Mahia players with head coach Dylan Kerr. Photo/RAYMOND MAKHAYAThe run-away KPL champions then swept aside Ulinzi Stars 2-0 before blanking Posta Rangers 5-0. They ended the month with a 1-0 win over Sony Sugar.“We respected every opponent we faced in the month of June and all I can say is that teamwork and dedication helped us grind the results. Despite taking part in many competitions and playing a match after every three days, we are happy to have won all our fixtures,” Kerr revealed.Kerr was nominated alongside Sofapaka tactician John Baraza but the K’Ogalo was unanimously voted the football writers after guiding his unbeated team to 52 points from 20 matches.This is Kerr’s second accolade as K’Ogalo coach, having picked his maiden award in September 2017.0Shares0000(Visited 2 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

‘Middle class – invest in the people’

first_img23 September 2005Deputy President Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka has urged South Africa’s black middle class to reinvest in their communities, to create the skills needed for the country to achieve the government’s target of 6% economic growth.Addressing the 20th anniversary celebration of the Medical Education for South African Blacks (Mesab) in Johannesburg on Wednesday night, Mlambo-Ngcuka said the rise of the black middle class was exciting, but came with responsibility.“Make sure that you not only serve, but create others like you,” she said.Mesab is a collaborative US and South African effort to improve the health of SA’s people by training black health professionals in the country.The organisation was founded in 1985 by Herbert and Joy Kaiser, who had extensive careers in the US Foreign Service.Speaking at the class of 1949 Commencement Address at his alma mater Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania last year, Herbert Kaiser said that during his three-year stay in South Africa in 1971 he was treated successfully for melanoma, a virulent form of cancer.“I benefited from the superb medical care available to whites but denied to black South Africans in apartheid South Africa,” he told the gathering.He said several years later the surgeon who saved his life wrote to him to say he was leaving his private practice to train black doctors. This, Sullivan said, was the seed that grew into Mesab.When Mesab started in 1985 there were only 500 black doctors in South Africa. Today, more than 6 800 Mesab-funded graduates work in the country’s public and private healthcare sectors.At the anniversary celebration, Health Minister Manto Tshabalala-Msimang said South African healthcare had benefited enormously from Mesab’s 10 600 bursaries and scholarship grants to black healthcare professionals.She said the government was busy finalising a human resources plan to curb the drain of healthcare professionals from the public service.Other interventions include the introduction of the midlevel worker – pharmacist assistants, physiotherapy, occupational health and radiography assistants – to reduce professionals’ workload, she said.The health department was also working with other departments such as National Treasury and Public Service and Administration to improve health professionals’ pay and working conditions.“This will ensure that in the long term the support we get from organisations such as Mesab benefits the public health service by retaining these professionals,” said Tshabalala-Msimang.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

Overview: the Gauteng Stakeholder Workshop

first_imgThe Gauteng Stakeholder Workshop featured vibrant discussion about the existence of a country’s brand, the pros and cons of having one, and the best way to build a nation brand. It was widely agreed that all provinces should align with the overall nation brand message. From left to right, Sipho Mhlongo, from the Gauteng Growth and Development Agency, Brand South Africa chief executive Kingsley Makhubela, and Joburg Mayor Parks Tau address stakeholders at the Gauteng Stakeholder Workshop on 19 August 2015. (Image: CD Anderson)• Brand South Africa salutes Cowen High School for winning the Umhlobo Wenene FM debate competition • Brand South Africa invites stakeholders to contribute to insights on the South African Nation Brand • Young South Africans plan to stay at home • People and complexity: the missing ingredients in celebrity activism for Africa • Brilliant young minds at the CSIR Priya PitamberSouth Africans should concentrate on the positive: “We should be defined by what we are doing.” This was the message from newly appointed chief executive Kingsley Makhubela at Brand South Africa’s Gauteng Stakeholder Workshop, held in Sandton on 19 August.Sipho Mhlongo, group executive for trade, investment and regulatory enablement at the Gauteng Growth and Development Agency welcomed everyone to the discussion, held at the Gauteng Investment Centre. He said there are many great things happening in South Africa.One strong message about positivityMakhubela spoke about the importance of the provinces and the country aligning the overall brand message. “It’s important that provinces align [brand] messages and in the process of aligning it, not shoot ourselves in the foot.”He brought up instances in which South Africa had performed well – surviving the 2008 economic downturn and not having to bail out any banks; the rapid growth of the corporate sector since the mid-90s; and the good performance of the country’s academic institutions. He pointed out that six South African universities featured in the Top 10 list of the Times Higher Education (THE) Africa University Ranking.Makhubela recounted an anecdote: he got an opportunity to study overseas but one of his lecturers at a South African university advised him it was important to study in Africa, because that way the knowledge was able to remain on the continent.But South Africa also faced huge problems, he admitted, bringing up the issue of the local drug cocktail, nyaope. “We are going to lose a generation [to drugs],” he warned. “These sorts of social issues need to be addressed.” And one way to do this was to grow the economy.Big city lifeJoburg Mayor Parks Tau noted the importance of cities in identifying problems and finding solutions. The South African Cities Network, which represents most of the country’s main cities, acknowledges the large role big cities played in a country.It publishes a State of the City report about the work done. “Cities have become important pointers of development,” Tau stressed. “Cities have a role to play in finding solutions and resolving complex issues.”Joburg, the largest city not close to a river or sea, was a city of migrants and their ability to make it grow resulted in its success. “Forty percent of the people in Joburg now, are born outside of Joburg.”While it had made strides in investing in infrastructure, problems still existed, such as traffic congestion. The solution did not exist in building more roads, the mayor said. “We have to create alternatives because we cannot build our way out of problems… It’s about changing our mind-set.”He encouraged the audience to take advantage of the upcoming #EcoMobility campaign in October, aimed at getting people out of cars and using other modes of transport.South African Competitiveness Forum Dr Petrus de Kock, Brand South Africa’s general manager for research, spoke about the need to find a way to position the brand of the country. (Image: Priya Pitamber)The first session of the day, by Dr Petrus de Kock, the general manager for research at Brand South Africa, was about the South African Competitiveness Forum (SACF). The inaugural SACF took place back in 2013, born of a need to identify the work of positioning the brand of the country.In his presentation, De Kock described the SACF as a call “on all South Africans to play their part and engage in collaborative efforts to build a strong national reputation based on a globally competitive economy”.“As Brand South Africa, we have to understand the range and strengths of the nation to market it to the world and locally. Getting input from provinces can help with the messaging sent out,” he added.There was also opportunity to learn from where the country had succeeded and apply those lessons to challenges.A few discussion points emerged from the session, too, including the recent xenophobic incidents in the country and the response to them. De Kock said there was a lot of messaging in that period from the government and officials. Brand South Africa also studied the social response. “It doesn’t matter how small a group is, damage can be caused to the reputation,” De Kock observed.Other topics of discussion were whether it was possible to tackle negative perceptions of the country; whether it was a risk to build a nation brand; how the media could help in building a positive image of the country; the funding of small and medium enterprises; and how South Africa’s sense of pride was defined.“National pride is linked to inner emotions; it’s more than tourism and sport,” a speaker said.Nation Brand Master Class Brand South Africa acting chief marketing officer Sithembile Ntombela gave a Master Class on the Nation Brand. (Image: Priya Pitamber)Sithembile Ntombela, Brand South Africa’s acting chief marketing officer, conducted the Nation Brand Master Class. She said it was important build the nation, to find a nice narrative of South Africa. “We are selling our country,” she said.“The master class is about building a nation brand that at its core is unified through its diversity,” she noted in her presentation. “Building anything requires taking many pieces that work and fit together to make the bigger picture complete.”Provinces should align their messages with that of the country, Ntombela added, which would require a lot of planning. “We must relay true and relevant messages,” she said. “And promote a common sense of identity and pride.”A puzzle approach would work best because it could be used to “educate and guide key stakeholders in the intricacies of handling a nation brand, we created work that literally shows that everyone has a part to play in making our country a complete and competing nation”.Brazil, she said by way of example, was automatically associated with flair, the samba, and carnival; history was attached to Egypt, India and Peru; so too could South Africa create its unique stamp to sell to the rest of the world.Feedback on researchDe Kock shared the outcomes from the extensive research conducted by Brand South Africa, and it showed good news.“You can’t sell the brand of a country, without inside buy-in,” he reasoned. So the research started in the domestic arena, to find out what issues were on the minds of South Africans. It made use of a diverse national sample of 2 524 people.The Domestic Perceptions Research showed that while there were concerns among South Africans relating to crime, corruption and a lack of job opportunities, it also found that “citizens want to focus on solutions. And South Africans are willing to take action, rather than wait for someone else to do so.”Findings also showed that the majority of the population was under 35 and lived in urban areas; there was an increase in the middle class after 1994; 92% of the sample interviewed had a “good” or “strong” sense of pride; and many South Africans were aspirant that their children would live a better life than what they did.Country Messaging Framework Manusha Pillai, the Brand South Africa general manager of communications, talked about the Country Messaging Framework. (Image: Priya Pitamber)Brand South Africa’s Manusha Pillai, the general manager of communications, spoke about the National Development Plan (NDP) and how it could be tied into the country’s messaging framework.Pillars of the Country Messaging Framework mirrored the NDP and included tourism, culture and heritage, policy, people, brands, and investment and recruitment, all to be used to market South Africa.“Brand South Africa has been working with a various stakeholders from government, business and civil society to compile this Country Messaging Framework,” she said in her presentation, in which she described South Africans as having an energy and great problem-solving skills.last_img read more

The Perfect Potager

first_imgWhen people say that it costs more to build green, they are only half right. To build another generic house full of features that everyone is supposed to want but nobody really needs, using designer “green” products purchased at retail prices, would indeed cost more than building the same thing with conventional products. One of the keys to building green, though, is to think critically about every aspect of your home and to determine what is and is not necessary.My wife and I are doing that with our house. We are also doing it with our landscaping. Our lot is 68’x110’ and was surrounded on three sides by large trees. Both the front and back yards were full of weeds and not much else. For a couple of years, we mowed the weeds, bagged leaves for municipal pick-up, and talked about what we should do about landscaping.At the same time we were getting more into local food (slow food) and agriculture (permaculture). We started shopping more at farmers’ markets and Whole Foods, but we were careful about which items had “organically grown” labels because we were trying to stretch our food budget. We talked about growing a few things ourselves—vegetables that were expensive to buy and that tasted best right off the vine. Last summer we built three raised beds and enjoyed the bounty. In fact, we enjoyed it so much that we began planning out our landscaping to see just how much food we could grow ourselves. Our neighbors’ manicured lawns held little appeal, and we realized that small, well-planned gardens can be an attractive way to enjoy the outdoors.The first thing we decided to plant were things that would take a few years to mature. We chose a variety of fruiting trees, vines and shrubs that are disease resistant, hardy for our location, and have a variety of uses. In our front and side yards, we planted plum and cherry trees, which can stand up to our northwest winter winds, as well as a variety of shrubs and a birch tree that will attract wildlife. We planted hops vines and rhubarb for perennial food and flavoring. We didn’t want the chemicals our neighbor uses to be near anything we’ll eat, so we created an allée (a stand of lilacs in traditional French gardening; we’ve also planted dogwoods in ours) between our houses.In the backyard, we cut down some big trees on the southeast border and replaced them with a row of peach and cherry trees; the sensitive peach trees are in the most protected location we have. Several grapevines and highbush blueberries wrap around our deck, and two Precocious Hazelberts (a nut-producing shrub) are tucked under a tall oak tree. Native choke berries and winter berries will grow into a hedge along our shaded northwest boundary and provide winter food for birds.For the main vegetable garden, we wanted to expand on the success we had with our first three raised beds. The French have a tradition of laying out their potagers, or kitchen gardens, in attractive yet practical patterns. Following the advice of generations of organic farmers, including Eliot Coleman, we will rotate plant families through the beds to maintain soil fertility and foil disease organisms. At 3’x 8’, the beds are easy to reach across; 12-in.-deep soil drains well and warms up quickly in spring. The beds are arranged along a center aisle that’s wide enough to accommodate a garden cart, and there’s room enough between beds for a lawnmower.Trellises for tomatoes and cucumbers are easy to attach and reuse each year; growing vertically maximizes the sunlight and airflow these vigorous crops receive. Two “trench beds” complete the main garden; one for perennial flowers, which will attract beneficial insects; and one for potatoes this year, to be converted to more flowers next year. Instead of rototilling the beds each year, bringing weed seeds to the surface and destroying the soil’s texture, only the surface of the beds will be cultivated, followed with a topping of compost. The worms, fungi, and other organisms that live in the soil will toil for us relatively undisturbed, ferrying nutrients around and creating water-storing tunnels in the process.Behind the raised beds are perennial raspberry beds, and along the back and side fences are linear beds for peas, beans, and summer and winter squash vines. A planter next to our garden shed contains various mint plants, which would take over the yard if planted directly in the ground.We remind ourselves not to take all this too seriously, though. It is relaxing to wander among the plants in the evening to see what has changed and to ponder what we might do differently next year. Over time, our fruit trees will grow in, our gardening skills will improve, and our priorities will change. So far, it has been easy and fun to turn our backs on the conventional food system and do the most we can with what we have.last_img read more

Why Magazines Are Using Digital To Boost Prices, Not Bolster Innovation

first_img5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnout 4 Keys to a Kid-Safe App 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People… Well, this is disappointing.As magazines make the transition from print to pixels, some publishers are using the move as an opportunity to jack up their prices – in some cases, to more than they were charging for print editions. And that’s for tablet versions that are too often crappy afterthoughts. To be fair, magazines are contending with legitimate financial concerns. Their advertising revenue has been declining and the historically discounted subscription rates they’ve charged for print delivery just aren’t enough to pay the freight. To cope, many publishers are asking readers to chip in more – on digital versions as well as print editions.There are some problems with driving up prices too much, though.For one, everyone knows it’s cheaper to distribute content digitally than to print it and mail it. Asking buyers to pay more for something that costs you less to deliver is the kind of tactic that makes many subscribers feel exploited. It’s a head-scratcher, if not a subscription-canceler. Sure, magazine makers may still be coping with meaty legacy cost structures. But that’s not our problem, is it?  Readers Have Way More ChoicesThere’s also much more competition. Long gone are the days when magazines competed only with each other. Today, the entire Internet churns out content at a volume too great for any one human to keep up with – and it’s all instantly available at any time. In addition to traditional magazines gone tablet, there are the digital-only magazines, sitting right there on the skeuomorphic newsstand shelf. For every frustrated TIME subscriber, there’s a free download of the Huffington magazine, not to mention personalized, social-fueled digital “magazines” from Flipboard, AOL Editions, Google Currents, Zite and an ever-growing list of others. If Wiredjacks up its prices, there’s always digital mags from The Next Web and Engadet, not to mention the huge selection of tech coverage available through news aggregator apps and feed readers. How Publishers Have Fared With TabletsNot everyone in the publishing industry is enamored with the idea of publishing native tablet apps for readers to flip through. MIT Technology Review editor Jason Pontin vowed to kill his magazine’s native apps, citing high costs, technical challenges and the walled-off, un-Web-like nature of apps. The Financial Times famously pulled its iOS apps in favor of the HTML5 approach and isreportedly seeing more traffic and revenue since making the switch. Indeed, research has suggested that most readers prefer Web apps to native, platform-specific publications. 9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex… Related Posts Tags:#digital publishing#iPad#ipad magazines#magazines#tablets john paul titlow Still, some magazines have done pretty well with their digital editions, especially when they bundle them with print. In the United States, tablet publications are the second highest-grossing category of apps on iOS, according to an independent audit. Time and Conde Nast are selling the most digital mags, with news and women’s interest magazines dominating those sales. Half of Wired‘s revenue now comes from digital, which is a rare but promising milestone for a legacy publisher. I still subscribe to Wired in print, and I appreciate the fact that the iPad edition comes at no extra charge. I also happily pay for Marco Arment’s experimental publication The Magazine, because it consistently publishes content I enjoy in relatively small doses, rather than flooding me with irrelevant features and full-page ads.“The Magazine was profitable from day one,” says Arment. “As subscribers increased past break-even, I’ve been able to reinvest the additional income into more articles, higher author payments, original illustrations, photos and a professional editor.”While Arment won’t disclose hard numbers, he says he’s satisfied with what he calls The Magazine’s “fantastic success.” By utilizing what publishing expert Craig Mod calls “compact publishing” and monetizing it fairly, Arment has managed to build a profitable, if small media business in an age when industry trend lines have the stubborn tendency to slide downward.There’s clearly a limit to how much people will pay for magazine-style content. And it’s not at all clear that number is rising instead of falling. Folks who want to remain in the publishing business need to figure out a hybrid model that works, and not just jack up their prices to make up for shrinking subscriber rolls. Digital Magazines SuckThe business model isn’t the only issue here. Just as important is the consensus that most digital magazines just aren’t very good. In far too many cases, subscribing to a magazine on your tablet means downloading a bloated, glorified PDF that hardly delivers the potentially magical experience the form factor allows. Even some of the digital-only magazines from online publishers mimic print page-for-page in disappointing pinch-to-zoom layouts.  There are some promising alternatives. Wired‘s iPad app is pretty print-centric but at least the editors go to  the trouble of adding multimedia bells and whistles.  The Magazine takes an attractive minimalistic approach – both in terms of publication design and pricing.Traditional publishers may want to look to The Magazine for inspiration, as well as to social news aggregators like Flipboard and Zite, which have managed to produce truly addictive reading environments worthy of a slot in one’s home screen dock. Rethinking magazines for tablets will require publishers to get completely out of the print mindset. That means different layouts, lighter file sizes, deeper social integrations and yes, occasionally pointing readers toward content published by others. On the whole, digital magazines have a long way to go. When they get there, those of us who are most hungry for the news, analysis and entertainment they provide will happily pay up. Hopefully, there will be enough of us to make the best digital magazines into viable businesses.last_img read more

Tokyo returns with Summer Games with something new to prove

first_img“And there will be more to come,” Coates said. Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Read Next This time the Japanese capital wants to remind the rest of the world that China and South Korea haven’t left behind the first economic powerhouse in East Asia. They will use the games to showcase a clean, safe, and innovative city; an urban maze of nightlife, shopping, and dizzying subway lines that give texture to “Cool Japan” and the country’s place as a cultural touchstone.“It’s going to be a good opportunity to showcase Japanese culture, our technology, our products, our good level of service to give impetus to the Japanese economy,” Maki Kobayashi-Terada of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, told The Associated Press.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“It’s exactly soft power … to create economic impact,” Kobayashi-Terada added, a fancy term that means translating an engaging culture into political and economic power.Tokyo has billed itself as a “safe pair of hands” for the Olympics, which is everything that Rio de Janeiro wasn’t. The 2016 Games left behind scandals, millions in unpaid bills, and useless “white elephant” venues. But exactly what’s in it for Japan?Kobayashi-Terada said the Olympics will improve accessibility for the elderly and for people with disabilities, modernize infrastructure and drive tourism. She said Japan had 29 million foreign visitors last year, and hopes to have 40 million in 2020. Tourism is booming, particularly from Asia.The Olympics will also try to convince the world about the safety of Fukushima, where a nuclear reactor was damaged after the 2011 earthquake and tsunami. The prefecture north of Tokyo is a venue for baseball and softball.“There are only some limited villages which are restricted for entry,” Kobayashi-Terada said. “But there are so many other places which are already under recovery. We’d like to show that and thank the world.”But there also hints of scandal.A French-led investigation has been looking into $2 million paid by the Tokyo Olympic bid team — or representatives — to sports officials who have been linked to vote-buying in IOC bid elections. A Japanese investigation concluded the payments were not illegal.“Our committee is different from the bidding committee,” Kobayashi-Terada said. “We believe that we got Tokyo 2020 because our bid was the best one.”And there are domestic doubters.Japan is already a high-tax country that does not need the Olympics to spur building new bridges, trains and highways. Taxpayers have been critical of too much spending on questionable projects.“Tokyo lacks a clear purpose for hosting the games other than city development, and that’s why many people are still puzzled today,” said Yuji Ishizaka, an expert on the Olympics at Japan’s Nara Women’s University. After 2 lopsided losses to Thunder, Durant leads Warriors rout Families in US enclave in north Mexico hold sad Thanksgiving Ishizaka said people are bothered by delays and scandals involving the redevelopment plans for Tokyo’s world-famous Tsukiji fish market and the city’s bay area, where several events will be held.And Ishizaka fears the Olympics “may be used to declare the end to disaster reconstruction” in the Fukushima area, suggesting things are back to normal.“The 2020 Games should be a big festival, but we can’t expect much growth and many people, even residents of Tokyo, will hardly notice the changes that Tokyo has gone through,” Ishizaka said.The IOC and local organizers say they’re cutting costs. John Coates, the IOC member overseeing Tokyo’s plans, said recently that Tokyo had cut $1.4 billion from the price tag. Some venues have been moved to other areas, and existing venues will be used instead of building new ones.Coates lauded Tokyo’s transparency and mentioned Rio.“In Rio we didn’t know who was paying what — if at all,” he said.Tokyo organizers say the games will cost about 1.35 trillion yen ($12.5 billion). However, last month Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike said the city would spend an added 810 billion yen ($7.5 billion) on “projects directly and indirectly related to the games.”The IOC and organizers argue those expenditures fall “outside the overall games budget.” This is a debate that rages at every games: Exactly what are, and what aren’t, Olympic expenses?Koike said the new costs included building barrier-free facilities for Paralympic athletes, training programs for volunteers, and advertising and tourism plans.That puts the total cost at about $20 billion, 70 percent of which is public money. This figure includes the privately run local organizing committee’s budget of 600 billion yen ($5.5 billion). About $2.91 billion of that is coming from national marketing program that has landed 47 sponsors. AFP official booed out of forum Tokyo also marks a watershed for the battered International Olympic Committee.After corruption dogged the games in Rio, and a doping scandal grew out of the 2014 Winter Games in Sochi, Tokyo should be the first of three return-to-normal Summer Games in first-world metropolises. The IOC has already picked Paris for 2024 and Los Angeles for 2028.And Japan also has hosted two successful Winter Olympics in Nagano and Sapporo.“I don’t think the International Olympic Committee is going to go to a developing city any longer,” Olympic historian David Wallechinsky told The Associated Press. “They don’t want that anymore. They want cities that are ready.”The Pyeongchang Olympics were Wallechinsky’s 18th, and he has researched every Olympics extensively including Tokyo. Those Olympics kicked off when Yoshinori Sakai — born in Hiroshima the day the city was hit by the 1945 atomic bomb — lit the Olympic cauldron.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Google honors food scientist, banana ketchup inventor and war hero Maria Orosa Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC LATEST STORIES John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding LOOK: Iya Villania meets ‘Jumanji: The Next Level’ cast in Mexico MOST READ U.S. urges Japan, South Korea to share intel PLAY LIST 01:35U.S. urges Japan, South Korea to share intel00:50Trending Articles00:45Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City FILE – In this April 28, 2017, file photo, a woman looks at the construction site of the new National Stadium for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics in Tokyo. Tokyo used its famous 1964 Olympics to show off a miraculous recovery from defeat in World War II. This time the Japanese capital will use the games to showcase a clean, safe, and innovative city with great shopping and nightlife. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara, File)PYEONGCHANG, South Korea — Tokyo used its famous 1964 Olympics to show off a miraculous recovery from defeat in World War II. Japan was back after just 19 years with high-speed trains, geeky gadgets, and dazzling efficiency.Tokyo’s back again with the 2020 Summer Olympics, this time with something different to prove.ADVERTISEMENT Pussycat Dolls set for reunion tour after 10-year hiatus View commentslast_img read more

CleanUp Crew Travels to Acklins Ragged Island Second Evacuation Tomorrow

first_img Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, September 12, 2017 – Nassau – Director of the National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA), Captain Stephen Russell said there would be a flight today, September 12, 2017 at 2:00 p.m. to Salina Point, Acklins.   This flight would take men from the local community to help with necessary clean-ups on the island of Acklins.Prime Minister Dr. The Rt. Hon. Hubert Minnis urged the remaining 20 residents on his visit to Ragged Island yesterday to evacuate as health conditions were deemed unfavorable.    A flight will be sent for the Ragged Island residents tomorrow, Wednesday, September 13, to bring them to New Providence.Ragged Island will receive heavy-duty tarps to help to preserve what is left of standing structures and to salvage any remaining valuables.   The Caribbean Development Bank has given $200,000 to aid in these recoveries.Also, teams from the United States Agency for International Development/Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (USAID/OFDA) have offered assistance in heeding NEMA’s requests for additional heavy-duty tarps, water containers, blankets, and other essentials.  NEMA will also receive assistance from the Chinese Embassy and US Northern Command.Story by: Sydnei IsaacsPress Release: BISlast_img read more

BAHAMAS Environmental Activists Biminites Decry South Cat Cay Development Document Evidence

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, November 17, 2017 – South Cat Cay – A small plane circled slowly, flying over the blue-green waters of the northern Bahamas. It should have been a day of sightseeing, photographing an island under carefully managed development with its fragile marine resources protected as the gems that will lure those who will eventually visit, live there or leave their yachts.Instead, what they saw as they flew over South Cat Cay sent chills down their spines and cries of outrage and despair from their hearts.   The group in the plane included representatives from Save Our Home, a Bimini-based organisation, Save The Bays and Waterkeepers Bahamas.Save The Bays Chairman Joe Darville said what he saw convinced him more than ever of the urgency of creating comprehensive environmental protection legislation and placing an environmental watchdog on every project.“It takes hundreds, sometimes thousands, of years to create coral reefs and minutes with heavy equipment to destroy it,” said Darville. “We are pleading, not asking, pleading with government.   When will you listen?   When will we begin to take these gifts that God gave us seriously and stop allowing uncaring people to eviscerate them in the name of progress?   This is not progress.  This is evil.”The story below is their story, in their words.  Save Our Home wrote it at the close of their aerial and land inspection during early November, 2017. Their words have not been edited. The introduction, they said, was gleaned from previously published reports:In 2009, the Government of the Bahamas under PM (Hubert) Ingraham gave full environmental approval for the 85-acre privately owned South Cat Cay for an exclusive, high end, hospitality and marina project.   The project will comprise a 53 room five star branded boutique hotel with related amenities, 29 marina condo units, 37 residential units, a 137 slip marina, restaurants, shops and recreational facilities.     This high-end resort will also include an upmarket residential community.During the course of construction in two phases it is estimated that some 75 Bahamians will be employed, and upon completion and build out some 170 permanent jobs will be created.   In addition to the $94 million capital investment by the developers, their economic impact assessment projects over $200 million in real estate sales over the first five years, which will significantly benefit government revenues, suppliers and employment.   The developer said the project will bring considerable benefit to Biminites in the form of employment and entrepreneurial opportunities generated by proposed retail space and excursions in the marina village.   They said they plan to purchase Bimini built skiffs for bone-fishing excursions led by Bahamian guides.   A Bahamian will operate a ferry service to and from Bimini; an artist in residence program will expose Bahamian artists to new techniques; a recording space will dedicate studio time for local musicians and local cooks will be provided with classical training.   Additionally, a fund is being established for primary and secondary educational facilities in Bimini to further long-term environmental awareness. It is also proposed that a marine sanctuary will be created to the south east of South Cat Cay to complement the educational initiative.But there comes a point when you start to feel like it’s just Deja-vu, that we have heard all this before, been promised jobs for Biminites, been told the highest environmental impact studies are being adhered to, but the reality is, to those of us who live here, it’s all just “hot air” and what they think people want to hear to sell us another story of jobs, progress and investment, but at what expense is the big question?On Thursday, November 9 the Save Our Home-Bimini Environmental Activist group was invited along with members of the Save The Bays team and Waterkeepers Bahamas to fly over South Cat Cay and witness for ourselves what is really going on.   Pictures and videos never lie and there before our very eyes was proof that the development is taking place as we speak, without the relevant silt barriers in place, the kind that actually work and contain the silt that is, properly installed without gaps and without proof of the silt drifting for miles.   Memories of the same devastation at the hands of RW (Resorts World) Bimini in 2014 during the dredging of the cruise ship pier spring to mind, with the same ineffectual yellow silt curtains that within two weeks of being installed broke open, covering the ocean in drifting polystyrene and the beaches to this day, covered in yellow plastics.   The cruise ship was rendered obsolete in a year.   Meanwhile, we lost 12 main dive sites off the west coast of Bimini, smothered in silt, which suffocated the corals and partially buried the stones of Atlantis, sites that divers come from all over the world to see and that locals earn their living from in dive tours.   Marine life dwindled to a point that some species are no longer seen in these waters.In the past couple of weeks, more than one hundred Bahamians have been fired from RW, leaving people wondering if the resort is going bankrupt over rumors that they are losing in excess of $26,000 a day.   And whilst the resort here in Bimini conjures images of a sinking ship, long predicted by those of us in the know due to the size of the development being too big for the infrastructure on such a small island, the Government is meanwhile playing out the same story all over again in South Cat Cay.Large populations of turtles used to be seen on the cays around South Cat, just like they did offshore from RW Bimini.   Now the water is so muddy with silt, nothing can be seen and in Bimini an annual Power Boat Grand Prix is organized around the very reefs that are home to turtles and sharks.Bimini and South Cat Cay has a blessing and curse, a blessing that it is at the top of the Bahamas chain and so brings an abundance of tourism to these shores, but a curse that successive governments seem to cash in on in taxes from such large scale developments, none of which is seen invested back into the local communities.   As Fred Smith QC has pointed out, until we have local governance and taxes made on these islands invested back into local community developments, instead of going into the countries capital never to be seen again, the family islands will continue to deteriorate and decline.One would think, that when heads of agreement come together, that a budget could be put in place with the developers to financially cover the employment of an on-site environmental advisor to monitor the development and provide weekly reports that all is in keeping with plans laid out, providing jobs for Bahamians and protecting our shores.   Instead, developers seems to think they have carte blanche to do whatever they like while no one is watching.   Accountability seems sadly lacking throughout the Bahamas development.   At the end of the day, we are left with our natural resources ransacked and foreign developers pulling out, once the damage is already done.   New legislation is needed putting the environment first in order to save one of the most beautiful parts of the world before it’s too late.   With the Bahamas being such low lying islands and global warming and sea levels rising, it makes no sense not to put new environmental legislation at the top of the priorities list moving forward.Release: DPA NewsPhoto captions:Header:  Sand and silt from dredging and excavating on South Cat Cay can smother coral reefs and kill the life that depends on the marine habitat. Already, say representatives of three organizations that inspected the development site this week, the once plentiful sea turtles in the area are no more.1st insert: Dredging and infrastructure work is underway at South Cat Cay where a hotel and marina were approved for the 85-acre site under the former FNM government, but environmentalists want to know where is the protection for marine resources?2nd & 3rd inserts: Inadequate silt barriers allow disturbed sand and silt to float over open waters, smothering coral reefs and suffocating the life that depends upon the habitat, potentially endangering grouper, hogfish and reef species and upsetting the full eco-cycle in a fragile eco-system. The above image was taken from a small plane flying over a development underway at South Cat Cay in the northern Bahamas. Environmentalists from three groups want to know where are those who are supposed to be protecting the marine environment of The Bahamas? They fear the project will mirror the tragedies of nearby Bimini where world-famous dive sites were destroyed by a massive dredger to make way for a cruise ship dock. The cruise ship does not call on Bimini anymore and more than 150 people have been laid off from their jobs at the resort it was intended to serve. Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:last_img read more

Against all odds Topper is back home

first_img 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsEL CAJON (KUSI) – An El Cajon man who had given up all hope of finding his dog again has been reunited with his stolen pet.Tom Huffman’s dog, Topper, disappeared from a shopping center in El Cajon, while under a friend’s care last May. Huffman said he suspected another man, a mutual acquaintance stole the dog, and fled with him to Mexico. Huffman said he was resigned to losing the dog forever, when he received an unexpected phone call from someone in Missouri two weeks ago. Topper had been located when a police officer, trying to arrest a homeless woman in Kansas City, Missouri encountered the dog, who tried to nip the officer in the knee. Fortunately, Topper had a microchip which provided the information to locate Huffman in California. From there, a network of volunteers jumped in, to bring Topper home. More than a dozen volunteers took turns, each driving 200 mile segments across six states, taking the dog through MIssouri, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico and finally, Arizona. From Phoenix, the dog was put on a plane to Riverside County, where a final set of drivers brought Topper back to Huffman’s home in El Cajon on Sunday afternoon. Huffman called it “a miracle.” HIs mother, Roderica praised the network of volunteers. “There’s a lot of people with great hearts. The time and the effort it took to coordinate all of this, it boggles my mind,” Huffman said. August 27, 2018 Sasha Foo Posted: August 27, 2018 Sasha Foo, Against all odds, Topper is back home Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

W Moved Out of Fairchild Fashion Group

first_imgPatrick McCarthy will continue to serve as FFG chairman through the end of the year, Condé Nast said. The FFG includes WWD, WWD.com, Footwear News, Fairchild Summits, Fairchild Books and associated trade shows.Last year, ad pages at 450,000-circ. W evaporated—declining 45.8 percent, according to Publishers Information Bureau figures. Consumer fashion title W no longer will be managed by Condé Nast’s Fairchild Fashion Group, the publisher announced Wednesday morning.According to Condé Nast president and CEO Chuck Townsend, the restructuring “formally establishes a structure for W consistent with our other consumer magazine titles, and allows FFG the autonomy to focus on their core business-to-business publications and related businesses.”As a result of the restructuring, the senior editorial staff that was shared by W and trade title WWD will now work exclusively for WWD. Edward Nardoza, editor-in-chief of WWD, will report to FFG president and CEO Gina Sanders. Condé Nast will now search for a top editor for W.last_img read more