Kerevi keen to combine with Beale

first_imgKerevi’s 2016 Wallabies debut came at a time when Beale was out injured, prior to his departure for Wasps.That crossing of stars has left the pair with very little on field time together but that will, in all likelihood, change this year with Beale back on deck and Kerevi in career best form this Super Rugby season.The star outside centre was cut down by injury in the Reds’ loss to the Blues but prior to that he was the clear standout 13 in the competition and that was recognised this week, when he was named in the Super Rugby Team of the Year.”Kurtley is an exceptional player with an exceptional rugby brain,” Kerevi said.”We have been doing a lot of opposed stuff with the boys and trying different combinations in the centres.”For me, when I do train with Kurtley or train against him just seeing how he plays excites me.”I know he can bring that X factor to the backline and then we have guys like Israel Folau out back, Tevita Kuridrani and Henry Speight out wide that can finish off amazing tries.”Kerevi said the squad was happy to be past the fitness aspect of Bledisloe Cup preparations, as the team starts to hone in on how they will go about conquering the all powerful, all conquering All Blacks.”Here in Cessnock we have been training a lot with the team and the team shape,” he said.”it’s been really good to see how other boys play in the shape and see how they express themselves throughout the shape – it’s really exciting.”Injury has cruelled Kerevi’s young career to date.He cemented his spot as Michael Cheika’s go to outside centre after making his Test debut against England last year, only to have an ankle injury in the third Bledisloe Cup Test rule him out of the Spring Tour.Then, after starring for the Reds all season, the syndesmosis injury ruled him out of any June calculations.He is easing back into full contact this week but remains confident he will be fit and firing next Saturday.”I guess I don’t really reflect on it in a bad way,” he said of the injury sustained against New Zealand last year.”I took the opportunities that I got last year and brought it to this year.”I want to make sure I take every opportunity this year.”This group can change history and be part of it, that’s what excites me.”last_img read more

MacOS High Sierras Root Bug Makes Hacking it Easy

first_img –shares November 29, 2017 Image credit: pisaphotography | Shutterstock Apply Now » The bug appears to only affect High Sierra (MacOS 10.13.1), and Apple is working on a fix. Add to Queue 3 min read Michael Kan Guest Writer Apple The only list that measures privately-held company performance across multiple dimensions—not just revenue. MacOS High Sierra’s ‘Root’ Bug Makes Hacking it Easy This story originally appeared on PCMag Reporter 2019 Entrepreneur 360 List Mac computers with High Sierra (MacOS 10.13.1 or higher) have a serious bug that can let anyone gain root access to the system without a password.The hack is easy to pull off. It can be triggered through the Mac’s System Preferences application when “Users &; Groups” is selected, and the lock icon on the window is clicked. After that, a new login window will appear. Anyone who types “root” as the username, leaves the password field empty, and clicks unlock (once or twice) is on their way to a new account that has system admin privileges to the computer.With those privileges, the account can be used to modify the rest of the Mac and look up passwords on the keychain access. Even after a reboot, the root account remains.There are also reports the bug can be triggered at the Mac login screen, but not everyone was able to produce the same findings.The problem made headlines when security researcher Lemi Orhan Ergin tweeted about on Tuesday.????? pic.twitter.com/4TBh5NetIS— patrick wardle (@patrickwardle) November 28, 2017Amit Serper, a security researcher with Cybereason, replicated the result and said the bug “is as serious as it gets.”Hackers are always crafting malware that can gain greater system privileges into a computer. Now they have a new way, which can also be triggered via a Mac’s command line function. Imagine a piece of malicious code designed to attack Macs using the same flaw. Users wouldn’t even know they were compromised, Serper said.Shortly after the bug was made public, Apple issued the following statement:”We are working on a software update to address this issue. In the meantime, setting a root password prevents unauthorized access to your Mac. To enable the Root User and set a password, please follow the instructions here. If a Root User is already enabled, to ensure a blank password is not set, please follow the instructions from the ‘Change the root password’ section.”Security experts are still going over the bug, but it can be remotely exploitable, if for instance, screen sharing is enabled on the Mac.If certain sharing services enabled on target – this attack appears to work ? remote ??? (the login attempt enables/creates the root account with blank pw) Oh Apple ???? pic.twitter.com/lbhzWZLk4v— patrick wardle (@patrickwardle) November 28, 2017It does not appear Apple was made aware of the bug before it was publicized on Twitter, something the security community generally frowns upon. “This kind of public disclosure can put users at risk,” said Keith Hoodlet, a security engineer with Bugcrowd, which does crowdsourced security testing.He recommends users refrain from trying out the bug on their High Sierra-installed Macs. Doing so creates an account with super privileges, which can open it up to remote attack. To mitigate the risk, users who’ve decided to test the bug should create a password for the new root account, which can be done by following the temporary fix Apple provided. Next Article last_img read more