Dawson Creek RCMP actively investigating drug-laced cookies in elementary school

first_img“The investigation is in its early stages and the Dawson Creek RCMP are working in partnership with School District #59 and the Ministry for Children and Family Development in order to conduct a full and thorough investigation to determine if any criminality exists,” Cpl. Dave Tyreman said in a written statement.Superintendent of School District 59 Leslie Lambie released a statement earlier in the week confirming such allegations, and went on to validate the district’s continued implementation of programs educating students on the dangers of drug use and the risks of sharing food, asserting “student safety to be its highest priority.”“Any parents who may have noticed anything strange or unusual with their child or even sought medical attention are encouraged to call police,” Cpl. Tyreman concludes.- Advertisement -The Dawson Creek RCMP detachment can be reached at 250 784 3700.last_img read more

A Neighborhood In West Houston Hopes To Encourage Commuters To Do Things

first_img X To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: – / 7If your commute this morning was a slow crawl down the freeway,  Louis Jullien probably beat you to the office.“I like to tell people it’s six minutes from door to desk,” says Jullien. “So it’s a brisk commute.”Jullien lives out in west Houston in the Westchase District, in an apartment nestled between the steel and glass office towers.He works at the district’s office near Richmond and Beltway 8. And he gets there on foot.“So I kind of cut through these two tall buildings over here,” Jullien explains. “You’ve got NOV Tower and then there’s 10333 Richmond over there. And I kind of cut through the back.”According to a recent survey, Jullien is part of a tiny minority. The Westchase District has over 30,000 residents, but only about 1 percent walk to work.That’s compared to over 80 percent of the district’s workers who drive by themselves, like most commuters in Houston. And that’s a lot of vehicles. Over 88,000 people work in the district.But what do the numbers say about bike commuting in Westchase? Even fewer people do that, less than 1 percent.We spoke with Blair Johnson, a health and wellness consultant who lives in a neighborhood just off Wilcrest. She’s an enthusiastic cyclist but she says she prefers to drive her bike to a trail, rather than get out on the streets.“I am a nervous Nellie. I am the one that rides with all the protection, the hat and all that,” says Johnson. “I get out there and I get very nervous, because the cars are too close and the condition of the road.”So in a bustling business district that was built for cars, how do you get people to try something else? The Westchase District is proposing a long list of ideas in its new Bike/Pedestrian plan.To see what’s happening right now in  Westchase, we hop in the car with Irma Sanchez. She’s the district’s Vice-President of Projects.Our destination is the new Brays Bayou Connector Trail, a route that links the current Library Loop Trail with the Brays Bayou Trail. The connector runs a couple of miles along a drainage easement and it also allows access to Metro’s Westchase Park and Ride.The new trail is expected to open later this spring. The cost was about $4 million, with much of the money coming from the Federal Transit Administration.Walkers and cyclists can stay on the trail for the entire distance. It also includes several underpasses, so cyclists won’t have to cross streets.And Sanchez agrees that’s the only way a lot of people are going to get on a bike.“The majority of our community, and I think Houston overall, they’re not quite ready yet to be riding their bicycles with traffic,” says Sanchez. The overall goal for the Westchase District is to have about 40 miles of bike routes both on street and off. The plan also calls for things like new crosswalks and improved intersections. The long-term plan is expected to cost about $58 million with the money coming from various sources.Along with reducing congestion, Sanchez hopes the improvements will help lure younger residents to the district who don’t want to drive as much. “It, in essence, will have residential destinations closer to commercial and they’ll be able to commute by walking and taking the bus,” adds Sanchez. Back out in front of the office towers, pedestrian commuter Louis Jullien says it’s a day that can’t come soon enough.“So many people complain about the traffic in Houston,” remarks Jullien. “And I’m not one of those people fortunately.”The Westchase District will soon break ground on its next project. It’s a trail along a utility right-of-way, the first of its kind in Houston. Listen 00:00 /03:33 Sharelast_img read more

Houston Teen Accepted to 20 Colleges Gets Full Rides To Each

first_imgA teen in the Third Ward will have to choose between twenty colleges this month. Lamar High School senior Micheal Brown, 17, has a full ride to each university where he applied.Brown said it was a slow build up of excitement as his acceptances started coming in last November through March. Brown will now begin visiting schools to decide which he will attend this fall. “I never imagined this would happen,” Brown said, “but I’m really happy about it.”Michael Brown celebrates his acceptance to Stanford. The 17-year-old from Houston, Texas, applied to 20 of the best universities in the US and was admitted to every single one with a full ride — and $260,000 in additional scholarship offers https://t.co/YZZdYtKOB5 pic.twitter.com/nIUB14cYjg— CNN (@CNN) March 31, 2018Trisha Cornwell is the Executive Director of EMERGE, a program Brown was involved with, since the 10th grade. The group “empowers & prepares high-performing students from underserved communities to attend and graduate from selective colleges & universities across the nation,” according to its mission statement.“We’re so excited for Micheal. He’s really a prime example of what happens when talent and preparation meet opportunity and access. And that’s what we do at EMERGE,” Cornwell told News 88.7.“Our real focus is ensuring the most talented students in Houston get the same opportunity and access as their wealthy peers from some of the most elite private schools in the city. My hope is that Micheal’s success inspires other students from his neighborhood, and neighborhoods like his across the city, to reach higher, and know they can apply to the most selective colleges across the country and get in,” Cornwell said.Brown said he has narrowed down his choices to Harvard, Princeton, Northwestern, Yale, University of Pennsylvania, Stanford, Georgetown, and Vanderbilt. He attributed his success to the mentors he’s had while growing up. “Especially looking forward, I think something that’s going to be important to me is like the simple idea of giving back to others the things that have been given to me,” Brown said.Brown wants to major in political science and become a lawyer or politician. He said he wants to help create change in his community, citing the election of President Barack Obama as highly influential.  Sharelast_img read more