Warriors’ Kevin Durant on reports of his interest in Knicks: “I have no clue where that stuff comes from”

first_imgPresuming that he opts out of his $31-million player option, where will Durant sign as a free agent next summer? That inquiry had a new twist, … * * *Subscribe to the Mercury News and East Bay Times for $40 a year and receive a free Warriors championship coffee table bookOAKLAND — Kevin Durant knew the questions were coming, even before he sat in the interview chair. After all, the questions have remained the topic of conversation throughout his 2018-19 season with the Warriors.last_img read more

Using Aliens to Titillate the Public

first_imgGeologists cannot even figure out our own planet (next headline), but some of them claim to know a lot about other planets – their geological history, and even their prospects for life.  Is it fair to tease the public with the L-word life when so much remains to be understood on the ground under our feet?Mars life:  A new study reported by PhysOrg from a JPL press release claims that Mars had a nearly global wet era 4 billion years ago.  Talk about water on Mars has gone back and forth for decades; was it really necessary to evolve life there by just adding water?  “The new findings suggest that the formation of water-related minerals, and thus at least part of the wet period that may have been most favorable to life, occurred between that early giant impact and the later time when younger sediments formed an overlying mantle.”  (Nobody saw that impact, by the way.)Mars hands:  “If there’s life on Mars, it could be right-handed,” teased a headline on New Scientist.  The article was about chiral molecules, but it made Mars a lively place.  Some astrobiologists have never been able to forgive the 1976 Viking landers for not finding life.  One experiment gave ambiguous results that are the basis for ongoing hopes.  They keep trying to find other explanations for the gas that Viking measured coming out of a prepared broth when Martian soil was added.  Jeffrey Bada, astrobiologist at Scripps, still thinks non-biological explanations can explain this.  “No matter how you construct an experiment, Mars is likely to throw you a curve ball,” he said.Europa bones:  An Arizona planetologist has an easier way to look for life on Europa.  PhysOrg reported how he feels one could find evidence of it on the surface without having to drill through the ice.  It might not even be microbes, Richard Greenberg (U of Arizona) said: “there’s always the possibility that we could find structures – something analogous to skeletal remains.”Starry avatars:  A JPL press release seemed to play on the public’s fascination with the recent 3-D alien movie by starting, “Many scientists speculate that our galaxy could be full of places like Pandora from the movie ‘Avatar’ — Earth-like worlds in solar systems besides our own.”  So have they found any?  Nope; just looking.  “Once considered the stuff of science fiction, it may not be long before Earth-like planets, or, in the case of Pandora, Earth-like moons of giant planets, are found to exist other places besides the silver screen.”  That was in a paragraph captioned, “Pandora, up close and personal.”  Incidentally, the real Pandora is a small moon of Saturn.  Here it is, up close and personal from Cassini.  Not quite like the movies.For SETI fans, Space.com announced that Frank Drake is retiring as director of the SETI Institute, and is turning the job of “Chief Alien Life Hunter” to long-time astrobiologist David Morrison.  Even though NASA doesn’t do SETI work, Morrison revealed an inside secret: “The SETI Institute has partnered with scientists at NASA Ames in a teaming arrangement that has greatly benefited both organizations.  The Institute played an especially important role in the development of the new multidisciplinary field of astrobiology.”  The two fields are closely allied, if for no other reason than the fact that neither has any evidence to support its reason for being.This has all the appearance of a cult (see CMI essay).  Only in this case, we have a cult funded by taxpayer dollars and preached by the mainstream media.  It’s not science if you have no evidence.  Whatever happened to separation of search and state?(Visited 36 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

‘Middle class – invest in the people’

first_img23 September 2005Deputy President Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka has urged South Africa’s black middle class to reinvest in their communities, to create the skills needed for the country to achieve the government’s target of 6% economic growth.Addressing the 20th anniversary celebration of the Medical Education for South African Blacks (Mesab) in Johannesburg on Wednesday night, Mlambo-Ngcuka said the rise of the black middle class was exciting, but came with responsibility.“Make sure that you not only serve, but create others like you,” she said.Mesab is a collaborative US and South African effort to improve the health of SA’s people by training black health professionals in the country.The organisation was founded in 1985 by Herbert and Joy Kaiser, who had extensive careers in the US Foreign Service.Speaking at the class of 1949 Commencement Address at his alma mater Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania last year, Herbert Kaiser said that during his three-year stay in South Africa in 1971 he was treated successfully for melanoma, a virulent form of cancer.“I benefited from the superb medical care available to whites but denied to black South Africans in apartheid South Africa,” he told the gathering.He said several years later the surgeon who saved his life wrote to him to say he was leaving his private practice to train black doctors. This, Sullivan said, was the seed that grew into Mesab.When Mesab started in 1985 there were only 500 black doctors in South Africa. Today, more than 6 800 Mesab-funded graduates work in the country’s public and private healthcare sectors.At the anniversary celebration, Health Minister Manto Tshabalala-Msimang said South African healthcare had benefited enormously from Mesab’s 10 600 bursaries and scholarship grants to black healthcare professionals.She said the government was busy finalising a human resources plan to curb the drain of healthcare professionals from the public service.Other interventions include the introduction of the midlevel worker – pharmacist assistants, physiotherapy, occupational health and radiography assistants – to reduce professionals’ workload, she said.The health department was also working with other departments such as National Treasury and Public Service and Administration to improve health professionals’ pay and working conditions.“This will ensure that in the long term the support we get from organisations such as Mesab benefits the public health service by retaining these professionals,” said Tshabalala-Msimang.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

Gallery: Brand South Africa in Davos – part 3

first_imgBrand South Africa had a strong and vibrant presence at the 40th Annual Meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, in late January 2010, with a particular focus on the 2010 Fifa World Cup. In this gallery we bring you the highlights.Click on a thumbnail for a larger image.For high-resolution images, visit the World Economic Forum online. The panel of the session Rebuilding Education forthe 21st Century in the Congress Centre at theAnnual Meeting 2010 of the World EconomicForum in Davos, Switzerland, on Saturday 30January 30: from left, Queen Rania Al Abdullahof Jordan, a member of the Foundation Board of the World Economic Forum and the Global Agenda Council on Education Systems; John T Chambers, CEO of Cisco, US, Irina Bokova, director-general of Unesco; Trevor Manuel, minister in the presidency for South Africa’s National Planning Commission; and Harold McGraw III, CEO of the McGraw-Hill Companies, US.Photo: Michael Wuertenberg, World Economic ForumManuel speaking during the session Rebuilding Education for the 21st Century on Saturday 30 January 30Photo: Michael Wuertenberg, World Economic Forum Manuel speaking during the session Rebuilding Education for the 21st Century on Saturday 30 January 30Photo: Michael Wuertenberg, World EconomicForumManuel and McGraw in discussion after the session Rebuilding Education for the 21st Century on Saturday 30 January 30Photo: Michael Wuertenberg, World Economic Forum Gene Falk, South African social entrepreneur and co-founder and executive director of mothers2mothers, at work in the CongressCentre in Davos on Saturday 30 January.Photo: Michael Wuertenberg, World EconomicForumSouth African Minister of Water and Environmental Affairs Buyelwa Sonjica speaking during the session Rebuilding Water Management on Saturday 30 January.Photo: Remy Steinegger, World Economic Forum Peter Brabeck-Letmathe, chair of Swiss company Nestle and member of the Foundation Board of the World Economic Forum and Global Agenda Council on Water Security, seated next to Sonjica duringthe session Rebuilding Water Management on Saturday 30 January.Photo: Remy Steinegger, World Economic ForumStanley Fischer, governor of the Central Bank of Israel (left) and South African Minister of Finance Pravin Gordhan at the session Redesigning Financial Regulation on Saturday 30 January.Photo: Sebastian Derungs, World Economic Forum South African Minister of Finance Pravin Gordhan speaking at the session Redesigning Financial Regulation on Saturday 30 January.Photo: Sebastian Derungs, World Economic ForumBRAND SOUTH AFRICA IN DAVOSPART 1PART 2 PART 3THE CAMPAIGN More galleries: For more great South African photography, including the Proteas jetting off to the ICC World Cup, grassroots football, Nelson Mandela meeting Bafana Bafana, high-rise office buildings in Sandton, and South Africa’s new ape-man fossil – visit the Media Club South Africa gallery page.last_img read more

Matric revision returns to the big screen

first_img18 July 2012 The maths and science revision campaign EduC8 will once again assist Grade 12 learners prepare for their exams through revision sessions broadcast at selected Ster-Kinekor cinemas around South Africa each Sunday from 22 July. Each revision session of EduC8 – an 8ta initiative endorsed by the Basic Education Department and partnered by companies BHP Billiton, Primestars and Samsung – will be filmed at a single venue and broadcast to a network of 15 digitised Ster-Kinekor theatres across the country. The sessions will run every Sunday until 23 September and will be both educational and entertaining, allowing learners to interact with qualified teachers who will be available at each cinema complex. Additional coverage for equal opportunities Launched in July last year, EduC8 is aimed at learners from disadvantaged backgrounds across the country. This year, it will reach three additional areas – Witbank, Richards Bay and Kuruman – as part of the project’s commitment to being as widely accessible as possible, and giving equal opportunities to all disadvantaged learners. Special allowance will also once again be made for learners who will not be able to attend the revision sessions due to their geographical locations. These students will be able to access the material online at http://edusynergy.co.za/. One of the initiative’s successes is last year’s participant Zanele Khumalo (18), who attended the revision sessions at Maponya Mall in Soweto. Khumalo is now on her way to Cuba on a scholarship to study medicine. ‘Maths and science a foundation for growth’ “We all acknowledge that maths and science education is the foundation for many of the jobs needed to develop the country’s infrastructure and therefore our economy’s growth,” senior managing executive of Telkom Mobile, Amith Maharaj, said in a statement. “Increasingly these subjects are a critical component of getting ahead and the company is proud to be part of this student initiative which sees government and the private sector working closely towards a common goal,” Maharaj said. BHP Billiton chairman, Dr Xolani Mkhwanazi agreed: “If we are to transform this nation, pushing it to greater heights than ever before, giving all who live here equal opportunities to grow and succeed, we need to start at a grassroots level with skills development and education. “The children empowered by the EduC8 Matric Revision will be those talented, skilled employees, given the opportunity. We need to recognise that the future begins with the children of South Africa and that that future begins now,” he said.Skills development in engineering and science EduC8’s objectives run parallel to sponsor Samsung’s Blue Education programme, which aims to facilitate 10 000 electronic engineers across Africa by 2015, and it is hoped that learners who participate in the revision sessions will be fed through into Samsung’s skills development programme. The Sasol Inzalo Foundation and national bursary organisation Studietrust are also adding their backing to the initiative by reserving at least five full-cost bursaries for qualifying applicants who attended EduC8. The vision of the Sasol foundation is to be a significant contributor to sustainable economic growth in South Africa by focusing on skills development in engineering and science, including a bursary programme that started in 2010. The main criteria for the selection of applicants are academic potential and financial need. Each programme workbook made available to participants contains a bursary application form with information on selection criteria and the application procedure. The closing date for 2013 applications is 30 September. Learners interested in attending the revision sessions, or principals and teachers who would like more information, can call Jacques du Plessis or Mark Wilmot 081 445 9233. Alternatively SMS your name, contact number and school to 081 445 9233 and you will be contacted. You can also register by visiting http://edusynergy.co.za/. Seats are limited. SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

Arlington FFA hosts Farm Day

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest On May 11, 2017 the Arlington held Farm Day, where most of the FFA members brought in either a tractor or some kind of livestock.  On this day Zoie Young and Holly Lee brought their rabbits. Seth Courtney and Dylan Miles brought  calves. Gavin, Caden, and Jared Isenbarger  brought pygmy goats and piglets. Lillian Swails brought her Alpaca. Tyler Vanderhoff brought his mini sprayer. Colin Tobin brought his duck. Tessa Bowling and Ivy Kidd brought their horses. Meaghan Hummell brought her ewe and two lambs. Courtney Fox brought her donkey and her miniature horse.  Brittani Wright brought her chickens. TheFFA Alumni President Mr. Brad Beach brought three different varieties of eggs for the FFA to take care of and to watch hatch. The following individuals brought their tractor’s; Ashley Glick, Chayton Newman, Brayden Bushong, Seth Richards, Colton Kidd, Tyler Rowlett, Bailey Parke, and Blake Bishop. Our gates were provided by Charlie Beagle. The FFA had students k-6 and the Shining Star preschool come and see all of the farm animals and tractors. The students were required to teach the kids about what it is that they brought.last_img read more

Understanding the Brahmaputra and the annual flooding in Assam

first_imgSand is being dug from the river Brahmaputra due to massive siltation in the water ways in the outskirts of Guwahati on November 25, 2015. Gulzarilal Nanda, Union Planning Minister, visit a rapid survey of flood and erosion-affected areas of Assam on August 22, 1954. Photo shows the Union Minister (third from right) looking at the swirling Brahmaputra at Palasbari about 14 miles from Guwahati.  | Photo Credit: The Hindu Archives The permanent destruction of wetlands in the State has also been contributing to the deluge. File The massive earthquake that ravaged Assam on Independence Day that year not only claimed over 1,000 lives, but also changed the course of the mighty Brahmaputra. The riverbed rose as the mountains shook, and what had been a stable course became a constantly shifting one eroding the banks.This especially increased the amount of silt carried by the river and its tributaries. The silt was deposited on the banks downstream, and on the riverbed. Due to this heavy deposition, the river “frequently changes its course with the main channel flowing into multiple channels” hitting the river bank causing further erosion, a study published in 2014 by the Civil Engineering Department, Royal Group of Institutions explains.The riverbed area of the Brahmaputra has increased by more than 50 per cent through erosion since the quake. According to a report on climate change published by the government of Assam in September 2015, erosion has destroyed more than 3,800 square kilometres of farmland, which is nearly half the size of Sikkim, since 1954. Due to erosion, the riverbed area has expanded from around 3,870 sq.km. estimated between 1916 and 1928 to 6,080 sq.km. in 2006. Based on the civil engineering report, between 1954 and 2008 about 4,27,000 hectares has been eroded at the rate of 8,000 hectares per year.  Controlling the floodsOne of the main methods used in the State to control floods is embankments, but almost every year the Brahmaputra and the Barak breach their banks, inundating agricultural land and houses. “The most recent embankments are 25 years old,” says Himanshu Thakkar, coordinator of the South Asia Network on Dams, Rivers and People. “Checking embankments before monsoon should be done as we never know where it will be breached. When the flow is extreme, erosion capacity is greater,” he adds.In August this year, the State government announced that as many as five dredgers will be used to deepen the Brahmaputra, and the harvested silt will be used to construct the 725-km Brahmaputra Expressway along both banks of the river. In an earlier report, the Chief Minister Sarbananda Sonowal told The Hindu: “We believe it will not only improve the water-carrying capacity of the Brahmaputra, but also make the river navigable for bigger cargo ships. That used to be the case before Independence.”Sanjoy Hazarika, director of the Commonwealth Human Rights Initiative is unconvinced. He is for an engineering assessment, along with environment assessment, as dredging “might change the course of river.” Mr. Thakkar adds that the way dredging is done followed by the construction of highway on both banks will determine the changes the river will see.The Brahmaputra Board, under the Ministry of Water Resources, had suggested constructing dams in Assam and Arunachal Pradesh about 30 years ago, the Subansiri project being one of them. Subansiri was initially designed as a hydro-power and storage dam, which the board believed would help reduce the impact of floods. However, it was later transformed into just a hydroelectric project aimed at generating 2000 megawatts of electricity, which invited opposition from local people and environment scientists.There is the possibility that hydro electric projects can worsen the situation. “Ranganadi project is a classic example of damage caused by the dam in downstream,” Mr. Thakkar points out. The dam in Arunachal Pradesh — part of a hydro-electric project — is on the Ranganadi tributary of Brahmaputra. During winter the river barely exists, but during monsoon it swells up, inundating villages. The All Assam Students’ Union in July this year demanded demolition of the Ranganadi hydro project, alleging that release of water by the North Eastern Electric Power Corp. on July 11 without prior notice affected hundreds of thousands of people in Lakhimpur and Majuli, media reported.  A similar story was told by Nishikant Deka, 80, of Gorubandha, a village about 40 km from Guwahati. He and his 12-member family had to evacuate their house in neck-deep water and take shelter at a naamghar (public prayer hall). They managed to carry some rice, and food provided once in a while by NGOs kept them going. The head of the house described how almost every year the family has to reconstruct the bamboo home that floodwaters destroy.The government of Assam estimates that 2,753 human lives have been lost along with 6,73,329 cattle and the total losses due to floods and erosion amount to nearly ₹4659.472 crore. Flooding this year took the lives of 157 people and destroyed hundreds of acres of land. According to the state disaster management authorities, in the past five years, flooding has killed about 500 people. | Photo Credit: Ritu Raj Konwar The permanent destruction of wetlands in the State has also been contributing to the deluge. Assam is home to more than 3,000 wetlands and many varieties of flora and fauna. “Wetlands, locally known as beels, act as reservoirs and rejuvenating them before monsoon can help in mitigating flood in parts of the state,” said Dulal Chandra Goswami, former head of department of environmental science at Guwahati University.“Wetlands play a very significant role as natural reservoirs of water that absorb part of the flood waters from the nearby rivers through their connected channels and also from surface runoff,” Mr. Goswami explains. Most of these wetlands are in derelict condition mainly due to human-induced factors such as encroachment for agriculture or infrastructure development.“To mitigate floods, any potential practical solution should be based on an integrated, multidisciplinary basin management plan focused on water and soil conservation together with geo-environmental, eco-biological and socio-cultural integrity of the basin,” Mr. Goswami says. “The basin management approach is essential in view of the interstate as well as international character of most of the tributaries and the mainstream.”Effects of Climate ChangeCompounding the issue of an unpredictable Brahmaputra, are the effects of climate change. “Climate change will result in more frequent and severe floods, which will increase the costs of reconstruction and maintenance on state infrastructure, including roads, irrigation, water and sanitation,” says the report on climate change published by the Assam government.According to the study, by 2050, the average annual runoff of the river Brahmaputra will decline by 14 per cent. However, there is a risk of glaciers melting, leading to flash floods.As the economy of Assam is largely dependent on natural resources, what happens with agriculture and forests has direct effects on the livelihood of its people. During floods, water becomes contaminated, and climate change has a direct impact on the water resources sector by increasing the scarcity of freshwater, which is a constant problem in summer.“The predicted increase in average temperature and decrease in the number of rainy days due to climate change will further stress water resources,” the report points out.The study goes on to say that heavier rainfall replacing continuous low or normal rainfall during monsoon might lead to flash floods in low-lying areas. This will also reduce the groundwater recharge. | Photo Credit: Ritu Raj Konwar  Change in approachWhile the present approach towards flood has been immediate relief, much more need to be done before torrential rains hit the State during monsoon. The short-term measures on which flood management in the State presently depends, such as rebuilding the breached embankments, are largely inadequate.Besides, more accurate and decentralised forecasts of rain can help in improving preparedness. “Weather reports should be made available on district level and should be accessible to public,” says Mr. Thakkar of the South Asia Network on Dams, Rivers and People. “Information should be available in local languages. With the forecast in, one can calculate how much more water will flow downstream, thereby alerting people in advance to evacuate. The nature of rivers is such that there is no way one can flood-proof whole of Assam so one has to keep it mind that floods will happen.”He adds that the water flow information shared by China on the Brahmaputra with India, for which India pays a certain amount, should also be shared with the public, as this will help in understanding the river better and therefore help people better prepare for floods.As the research scholars point out, studying the river and the impact of climate change is a must to understand why the state gets flooded every year. As line in a famous Assamese song goes: “Luitar parore ami deka lora; moribole bhoi nai (We are the youths from the banks of the Luit [Brahmaputra]; we are not afraid of death),” people in the Valley seems to be living by the same spirit. The human costLalita Biswas, 30, a daily wage earner at a brick factory in Morigaon, Assam, had to leave her submerged house in a village in Morigaon in a boat provided by villagers and take shelter in an open space on a nearby hillock. She was living in a polythene tent with her husband, who also works at the brick factory, and children. Her children have suffered from colds and fevers, and her family did not receive any help from the government, she said.“We’re always neglected because we are poor,” she said when asked if she had received any help from the state authorities. Ms. Biswas wasn’t alone. About 100 people climbed the hills to escape the flood and have to rebuild their houses and lives.Also Read All you need to know about Assam floods Marooned houses in the flood affected Morigaon district of Assam. “The river was swollen the morning after the earthquake, which seemed to last for an eternity. We saw fallen trees in it, people and animals flailing, dead bodies of people and animals that were carried on the strong current.”Krishna Chawla (née Das) was 13 when a strong earthquake that lasted about eight minutes jolted Assam and adjacent areas on the evening of August 15, 1950.The Brahmaputra River, which was always “eating away at parts of the state,” looked terrifying, she recollects. “All of us students went to help build embankments the next day, and while I was passing a bag full of sand to a fellow student, I saw the river take away the house I was born in. The house collapsed, and I stood there paralysed,” said Ms. Chawla, the daughter of a forest officer in Dibrugarh. | Photo Credit: Ritu Raj Konwarlast_img read more

10 days ago​Allardyce: Why would Pochettino quit Spurs for Man Utd?

first_img​Allardyce: Why would Pochettino quit Spurs for Man Utd?by Freddie Taylor10 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveFormer Bolton, Everton and England boss Sam Allardyce has questioned why Mauricio Pochettino would leave Tottenham for Manchester United.With Ole Gunnar Solskjaer in danger of losing his job at United, several reporters have linked Pochettino to the top job at Old Trafford.Given the poor form of Tottenham, it is possible that a Pochettino exit could happen in the winter or summer.But Allardyce believes the Argentine coach would be better off staying put because Spurs have a superior squad to United.Metro quote “Big Sam” as saying: “I can’t see Mauricio going anywhere at the moment.”Tottenham are a better squad than Manchester United – and that is a telling fact.”It’s alright saying, ‘this is Manchester United, one of the biggest clubs in the world’. But has it got the team to go with it to represent Manchester United?” About the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

OSU to face off against Michigan outdoors at Progressive Field

The rivalry between Ohio State and Michigan is about to get a little chillier. The OSU men’s hockey team will take on Michigan outdoors in the “Frozen Diamond Faceoff” at Progressive Field, home of the Cleveland Indians, on Jan. 15, 2012, at 5:05 p.m. This will be the first outdoor collegiate hockey game in the state of Ohio. OSU will be the home team in the neutral-site game and it will be played on a regulation-sized rink. Mark Shapiro, president of the Cleveland Indians, said in a Thursday press conference that he expects a full house for the game. Capacity at Progressive Field is 43,441. “We expect the place to be sold out,” he said. “I think recognizing how passionate the fan base is for Ohio State, recognizing that Michigan fans are extremely mobile and there also are a lot in the state of Ohio, and again the rivalry, we think (it) certainly sparks some interest.” Shapiro said the game will be a “unique” event, but they are staying “open and flexible” to hosting future hockey games, he said. This will be second time the OSU men’s hockey team has played outdoors. The Buckeyes previously faced off against Wisconsin in Lambeau Field, the home of the Green Bay Packers, on Feb. 11, 2006. OSU lost 4-2. Michigan has played in three outdoor games, including a game in 2010 at Michigan Stadium versus Michigan State. The game set a world record for attendance at a hockey game with 85,451 fans in attendance, according to the Guiness Book of World Records. Prior to Thursday’s announcement, the official OSU athletics website, ohiostatebuckeyes.com, changed the venue for the game against Michigan scheduled for Jan. 14, 2012, from Value City Arena to “TBA.” The game will be a part of “Indians Snow Days,” the second season-long event running from Nov. 25 through Jan. 16 at Progressive Field, in which fans can ice skate and snow tube at the stadium. A presale for tickets will be made available for students in the coming weeks at ohiostatebuckeyes.com. read more

Under I grew up watching videos of Leo Messi

first_imgAS Roma’s Cengiz Under has spoken of the sensation he felt playing against his childhood hero Lionel Messi, after their shock win against BarcelonaThe Giallorossi produced one of the biggest and surprising comebacks in the history of the Champions League on Tuesday night, where they overcame a 4-1 deficit from the first leg to defeat Barcelona 3-0 at the Stadio Olimpico and progress to their first semi-final appearance since the 1983/84 season.Under was on the bench for the decisive encounter, but came on for Patrick Schick in the 73rd minute and played a critical role by assisting Kostas Manoles nine minutes later for the decisive goal.David Villa, SpainQuiz: How much do you know about David Villa? Boro Tanchev – September 14, 2019 Time to test your knowledge about Spanish legendary forward David Villa.In an interview with Sporx, the Turkey international was still getting over the sensation of having played against Messi and revealed his delight with the win.“I grew up watching videos of Leo Messi,” said Under, according to Football-Italia.“That’s how it was since I was 10. Playing on the pitch with him was indescribable, and obviously I’m delighted with this win.”last_img read more