Chittenden Bank celebrates century

first_imgCHITTENDEN BANK CELEBRATES 100 YEARS SINCE CHARTERBurlington, Vermont – One hundred years ago a group of Burlingtoniansdecided that a need existed for a new financial institution in Burlington. On December 7, 1904 Chittenden County Trust Company was established andgiven two years to gather the capital to start operations.The founders of Chittenden County Trust Company were John. J. Flynn,Edward J. Booth, J.H. Macomber, E.F. Gebhardt, W.B. McKillup, E.P.Woodbury, A.O. Humphrey, J.S. Patrick and R.A. Cooke. On March 30, 1906,these individuals organized what is today Chittenden with only $50,000capital.”Chittenden has been a part of the Vermont community since 1904. Onehundred years later, we remain a significant part because of our employeesand our interest in the communities and the customers we serve” saysKathleen Schirling, Director of Marketing with Chittenden Bank.”Chittenden has grown significantly since our start in 1906, but as I lookback at our history through the years, I find one thing that has notchanged–our people! They distinguish themselves by dedicated andexceptional performance across the entire organization. Theyenthusiastically participate in planning and implementing. Thecreativity, dedication and teamwork of our Chittenden family is the reasonfor our past progress and is the foundation of our future growth. Ourpeople have a commitment to change, but we also have a dedication to thosetraditional values, which have always been at the core of Chittenden,”says Schirling.Chittenden is a full-service, Vermont-headquartered and managed bankproviding a wide range of financial services and products to individualsand businesses. As the largest Vermont-based bank in the state, Chittendenoffers over 50 locations. To find out more about Chittenden, visit ourwebsite at www.chittenden.com(link is external) or call your local branch.last_img read more

Isla pens QPR deal

first_img “He showed his quality in the World Cup for Chile and it’s a great loan signing for us. “He’s a versatile player, he’s full of energy. I’m confident he’ll be a really big asset for us this season” Isla, who has made 51 appearances for his country, added: “I am very happy to be here – this is the start of an exciting new adventure for me. “Everybody knows that the Premier League is the greatest league in the world and the QPR proposal is very interesting and one I am very excited about. “I hope this coming season is going to be great for both the club and myself. I will give 100 per cent in every game to help QPR in the Premier League.” Earlier on Tuesday, the 47-cap Chile defender completed his medical at Loftus Road and tweeted news of his move – before later removing the post. Redknapp’s fourth summer signing follows just a day after QPR paid a fee believed to reach £6million to prise Jordon Mutch away from Cardiff. The 26-year-old Chilean has received a work permit/governing body endorsement from the Football Association and is currently back in Italy to obtain his working visa. Rangers boss Harry Redknapp told www.qpr.co.uk: “He’s a top player and we’re delighted to have him here. Press Associationcenter_img Juventus defender Mauricio Isla has joined QPR on a season-long loan deal.last_img read more

Ebola Rescue Drama Thrills MacDonald Street Residents

first_imgThe Ebola infected man sat with his head bowed and apparently in pain as he emitted sounds of uneasiness.  Further from him, a woman, his wife, began to shout through a public address system, (PA), “Please husband don’t die.” It was evident that the fear of the unusual transmission of the deadly Ebola virus was central to the woman’s fear to go near her husband. All she was saying was, “Please don’t die,” when in fact he was losing it gradually. He was dying because out of her frustration, she had not followed the instruction to call the 4455 to get assistance from the Ebola Response Team to save her husband’s life. Meanwhile, another man, aware of what to do in such a situation, pulled a mobile phone from his pocket and began to call the Ebola Response Team.  “Yes,” he said, “there is a man who is suspected of having the Ebola virus here.” After some back and forth discussion on the phone, he turned to the woman and assured her, “Don’t worry they are coming to give the help your husband needs.”  In a few minutes, the Ebola Response Team arrived, and a man dressed in white, personal protective equipment (PPE) gear against the Ebola virus jumped out of the jeep.  “We are here to help you,” he assured the woman, who seemed very much confused.  “If you take my husband away,” the woman wanted to know from the man in white, “you are not going to take his kidney and sell it?”  “No,” the man said, and he began to address the woman’s misconceptions. “We don’t take kidneys from anyone who is suspected of suffering from this disease.” “It is that true?” the woman asked, her face askance, unsure what to believe. “You are not going to kill him, are you?” “No,” the man said, “we don’t do that to anyone who is taken to the Ebola Unit. We provide them with proper care and we make sure that they are fine.  “Early detection is the best way to give anyone suspected of suffering from the virus and it is a good chance for him to survive it,” the man in white reassured the lady.  Doing away of her disbelief, the woman said, “So all the bad things I heard about what you do to Ebola patient is not true?”  “Yes,” the man reassured her.  The man in Ebola protected gear held the suspected Ebola victim and slowly led him to the waiting jeep to be transported to a recognized Center for testing and supervision.   Meanwhile, many bystanders watched the scene from afar as this drama unfolded.  It was an awareness campaign by the Medical Renaissance League performed yesterday on MacDonald Street, near the Daily Observer newspaper’s offices.  The brief drama, according to the organization’s administrator, Ms. Theresa Praud, is part of her group’s Ebola Awareness Campaign in Montserrado County in the fight against the deadly disease.  Bystanders enjoyed the drama and, for a minute they behaved as though they were convinced that the message had been effectively communicated.  “I now know what the medical people are doing to help us,” said a woman who said she enjoyed the drama.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more