David Reynolds named deputy commissioner of BISHCA

first_imgDavid Reynolds, Senior Policy Advisor for Health to United States Senator Bernie Sanders, will join BISHCA as Deputy Commissioner of Health Care Administration.  The Health Care Administration oversees hospital budget review and the certificate of need process, maintains health care data bases, oversees quality reporting by hospitals and health insurers and supervises external claim reviews.  HCA is also responsible for liaison between BISHCA and the Green Mountain Care Board.  Reynolds will begin work at BISHCA in early December. ‘David Reynolds brings a rare combination of policy knowledge and on the ground experience in the delivery of health care to our work implementing health care reform in Vermont,’ said BISHCA Commissioner Steve Kimbell.  ‘I am very glad to have him join our team at BISHCA,’ he continued. David Reynolds holds a doctorate in Health Policy from the University of Michigan and brings to his new position extensive career experience in health care programs and policy and in federal and local government.  He is a resident of St. Johnsbury. BISHCA 11.8.2011last_img read more

FCPPL Wrap: Oly frustrate Kotoko as Olele goes 270 minutes without conceding

first_imgScorers: Richard Baffour, Noah Martey Striker Stephen Baffour Asare’s 44th minute penalty strike ensured Berekum Chelsea secure a 1-0 win over Hasaacas at the Golden City Park.On Saturday, goals from Petrus Shitembi and Emmanuel Osei saw AshantiGold defeat Inter Allies 2-0 at the Len Clay Stadium and stretch their lead at the top of the 16-team standings to 6 points. Heart of Lions stays second on superior goal difference despite a 0-2 loss to Bechem United in Bechem. Richard Baffour scored the first goal with in form midfielder Noah Martey scoring in the 82nd minute. Great Olympics managed to frustrate Kotoko in a thrilling 0-0 game at the Baba Yara Stadium with veteran goalkeeper Richard Kingson maintaining a 270-minute run without conceding in his return to local football. Scorers: Martin Antwi, Kennedy Kissi Koranteng Striker Nathaniel Asamoah continued his rich run of form by scoring a brace as Medeama defeated Aduana Stars 2-0 at the Tarkwa Park. Asamoah who won the player of the month for April now leads the scorers’ chart with 9 goals from 13 games. Medeama now lie 8th while Aduana maintain their third position. read more

Surprise: Men and Women Greatly Differ Genetically

first_imgby Dr Jerry BergmanAn article in New Scientist titled “Sex Differences in Human Gene Expression” concluded that “Researchers uncover thousands of genes whose activity varies between men and women.”[1] Specifically, their study found 6,500 genes were differentially expressed. They concluded that men and women are distinctly dimorphic, consequently one result of this fact is that they have very dissimilar disease susceptibilities.[2] The sexual dimorphic traits result mainly from differential expression of the genes that exist in both sexes. These results strongly go against the current politically correct view that the only differences between males and females are a few minor plumbing variations and a couple of small hormones.Two researchers, Shmuel Pietrokovski and Moran Gershoni, evaluated organ-, tissue-, and individual-specific gene expression from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTex) Portal data base. Researchers from the Weizmann Institute of Science produced a comprehensive genetic map of the genes that are differentially expressed in men and women.[3]This was not the first research in this area. One study found that mutations likely accumulated in genes that produced sperm because these mutations were expressed only in men. As a result, harmful mutations that cause health problems or death in only half of the population are passed on by women who have no sign of the mutation. The result is even further evidence for the accumulation of deleterious mutations that leads to mutational meltdown, the exact opposite that is required for Darwinian evolution. Evolution is thus true, but going backwards.To explore if other genes were differentially expressed, Pietrokovski and Gershoni examined close to 20,000 protein-coding genes. Of these, around 6,500 were expressed more in one sex than the other. They found removal of these genes by death or reduced fecundity was lower in these genes, thus these gene were more likely to be passed on to the next generation, resulting the accumulation of deleterious mutations.[4]The study is just one example of the latest research that emphasizes the many genetic differences between males and females. More surprising is the same sexual differences that have been found in animals. Kathleen Gardiner, a neuroscientist at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora, found evidence of brain region sex differences in mice.[5] Other studies have documented that sex differences in mice exist that can affect cardiovascular health, liver disease, and even cancer risk. These and many other studies were published in the Journal of Biology of Sex Differences.The study is just one example of the latest research that emphasizes the many genetic differences between males and females.Researchers studying pigeons determined that the sexes showed notably different gene expression patterns.[6] The researchers found hundreds of examples of differential patterns of gene expression in the hypothalamus, pituitary, and gonads, and, if they had looked at every body structure, presumably they would have found hundreds more differences.These differences may be due to, or in addition to, differences caused by genomic imprinting, the epigenetic silencing that allows certain genes to be expressed in a parent-of-origin-specific manner. Also, an allele on the Y chromosome inherited from the father causes sexually selective imprinting, silencing hundreds of genes. As a result, only the allele from the mother is expressed. Epigenetic silencing involves DNA and histone methylation, attaching a methyl (CH3) group, to block expression of the gene without altering the genetic sequence. Likewise, the Xist (X-inactive specific transcript), a gene located on the X chromosome in placental mammals is a major effector of the X inactivation process, creating even more genetic differences.Update from Editor 5/10/17: Science Daily mentioned the Weizmann report on May 4. On May 9, a WND Exclusive report offered more “proof that a man can never become a woman.” The report includes multiple stories of transgender males outcompeting true biological women in sports. “A biological male can take hormones, surgically alter his body and identify as ‘female,’ but the procedures still won’t make him a woman, according to new evidence found by Israeli researchers,” the report begins. “That’s because there are at least 6,500 genes that contain sex-specific instructions for males and females.” President of Oklahoma Wesleyan University Dr. Everett Piper notes that the transgender craze invading our culture is actually anti-woman and anti-feminist, because it pretends womanhood is unreal. If anyone can claim to be a man one day and a woman the next, that’s tantamount to denying the very existence of the female. Feminists should be outraged.[1] Akst, Jef. 2017. Sex Differences in Human Gene Expression. The Scientist. http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/49347/title/Sex-Differences-in-Human-Gene-Expression/[2] Gershoni, Moran and Shmuel Pietrokovski. 2017.  The landscape of sex-differential transcriptome and its consequent selection in human adults. BMC Biology. 15(7):1-15[3] https://www.gtexportal.org/home/[4] Weizmann Wonder Wander May 3, 2017. http://wis-wander.weizmann.ac.il/life-sciences/researchers-identify-6500-genes-are-expressed-differently-men-and-women.[5] Krisch, Joshua A. 2017. How Much Do Sex Differences Matter in Mouse Studies? February, 24. http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/48616/title/How-Much-Do-Sex-Differences-Matter-in-Mouse-Studies-/[6] https://www.nature.com/articles/srep45125.Dr. Jerry Bergman is a professor, author and speaker.Men and women are different in many major ways and the politically correct movement cannot change that fact. Every scientific test we have performed has documented this fact and now we know that many of these differences have a genetic basis.(Visited 847 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Country values and the Amish furniture boom

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Mike Ryan, OCJ field reporterOhio has been home to the Amish since 1808, when the first settlers moved west from Pennsylvania to settle the scenic, rolling eastern Ohio. Today, roughly 60,000 Amish reside in Ohio across more than 50 individual settlements and over 400 church districts.The Amish culture is known for its agrarian nature, but as farm technology has changed, food safety practices have evolved and farmland availability has become an issue for some Amish communities in recent decades, the Amish have looked to new areas of enterprise to make a living, including making furniture. The now booming Amish furniture industry started simply with just a handful of barns and shops. As more English discovered the value and craftsmanship of Amish-made furniture the niche business took off and now there are more than 80 regional locations that bridge the logistical, transportation and technology gaps between Amish craftsmen and modern shoppers. One such business is Oak Creations of Millersport that is celebrating 25 years of working with the Amish and the English. This Buckeye Lake region storefront is a testament to the owners’ passion for high-quality Amish furniture — for which they have a sharp eye — and their loyal customer base who appreciates the individualized attention offered by owners and operators Mike Finlaw and Rosann Franks, and their daughter, Emily Finlaw.They sell beautiful Amish handcrafted solid wood furniture in oak, cherry, maple, and other hardwoods, specializing in high-quality home furnishings at affordable prices in a wide variety of styles, wood types, finishes, and custom designs. Oak Creations attributes some of their longevity to the strong business and personal relationships they have with their Amish builders, with whom they deal directly.“We are passionate about our relationships with both our customers and our builders, and we need builders who are passionate about what they do. Our craftsmen have the same values as we do; and their passion for and pride in their product shows,” Rosann said. “Their respect for family values and strong work ethic goes hand-in-hand with what we are doing with our business.” Mike has been around wood his entire life, working in his family lumber business, Finlaw Lumber of Zanesville, and managing building supply companies in Columbus prior to getting into the furniture business. And this skill and expertise from a life of woodworking gives him discerning vision for well-wrought pieces. The direct relationships with the talented builders are important.“We have very solid, long-term relationships with our builders. I try not to deal with a middleman and I deal directly with over 150 Amish builders. We have worked with some of them for over 20 years, and they are like extended family,” Mike said. “We always help them out and we are very loyal to our builders. We try to stick with Ohio builders, and most of our products come from Stark, Holmes, Tuscarawas, and northern Coshocton counties.” At least two trips a week are made into Ohio’s Amish country to touch base with craftsmen and to pick up product.“I make 10 to 20 stops throughout Amish country every Monday. I place orders, transport furniture to finish shops, pick up hardware, and freight small finished products back to the store. These weekly business stops are also good for business relations, as lack of access to telephones for some in the Amish community can make communication a challenge,” Mike said. “The box truck goes up to Amish country on Wednesday and we then do deliveries Wednesday afternoon and Thursday.”The heirloom Amish furniture industry and Oak Creations itself have changed greatly over the past twenty-five years.“In the beginning, the demand was for only oak furniture with designs coming from a very limited catalogue. But the industry has exploded over the last 25 years and there has been great change in what is wanted and offered,” Mike said. “When we first opened, our products were coming from suppliers in Michigan that my cousin Roger, who had a furniture store in Kalamazoo, used. We quickly outgrew this, began dealing directly with our builders, and started doing more custom jobs and working with other wood types and design styles.”Once quality products are secured, Oak Creations then relies on quality customer service to match the right places with the right furniture. Rosann and Emily, who has a background in Interior Design, work with customers on a sense of proportion and creative insight that helps customers conceptualize what is needed and what would look best to really pull a room together.“Mike has an eye for how furniture should be built and good design work. For custom work, which consists of over half of our business, he can envision what a customer needs and what the finished product will look like. Our vision for what is needed and what may look best is a gift we give the customer. Our job is to educate the customer about quality and design, let them know what they should be looking for in a product, and then let them decide,” Rosann said.Long-standing customer loyalty is a boon to Oak Creations, which strives to provide personalized attention to patrons of the furniture shop.“With our furniture, we are creating a look that is both current and timeless. Certain people want to go more contemporary and others want to be more traditional, and we can accommodate either taste,” Emily said. “We design a lot of our own furniture, as well, and we strive to create a beautiful piece that is solid and well-constructed, but also at a reasonable price. Our furniture is not the most expensive and not the least expensive, but it is the best value. We are selling great quality, hardwood furniture for less than imports can be bought.”The business connects the niche production of Amish craftsmen and the consumers who appreciate and value those products.“There is a niche of people who appreciate and enjoy quality furniture and may want to pass it down. We cater to people who embrace the home as a place for family and friends. Our tables bring a lot of families together at the start of the day and at the end of the day,” Roseann said. “If it was just about money, I would have gotten out of the business a long time ago.”Today, Oak Creations’ sole location in Millersport is a 6,400 square-foot showroom adorned with beautiful furniture and filled with an array of unique country decor that is open Tuesday-Saturday from 10a.m. to 5 p.m. and by appointment. A visit to Oak Creations shows the Finlaws’ expertise in both furniture and hospitality and this year’s Holiday Open House will be held Nov. 1-10. Located at 2474 Blacklick-Eastern Road, Oak Creations is a study in Amish craftsmanship and down-to-earth country values. They can be reached at 740-467-2600 or at www.oakcreationsofmillersport.com.last_img read more

The Perfect Potager

first_imgWhen people say that it costs more to build green, they are only half right. To build another generic house full of features that everyone is supposed to want but nobody really needs, using designer “green” products purchased at retail prices, would indeed cost more than building the same thing with conventional products. One of the keys to building green, though, is to think critically about every aspect of your home and to determine what is and is not necessary.My wife and I are doing that with our house. We are also doing it with our landscaping. Our lot is 68’x110’ and was surrounded on three sides by large trees. Both the front and back yards were full of weeds and not much else. For a couple of years, we mowed the weeds, bagged leaves for municipal pick-up, and talked about what we should do about landscaping.At the same time we were getting more into local food (slow food) and agriculture (permaculture). We started shopping more at farmers’ markets and Whole Foods, but we were careful about which items had “organically grown” labels because we were trying to stretch our food budget. We talked about growing a few things ourselves—vegetables that were expensive to buy and that tasted best right off the vine. Last summer we built three raised beds and enjoyed the bounty. In fact, we enjoyed it so much that we began planning out our landscaping to see just how much food we could grow ourselves. Our neighbors’ manicured lawns held little appeal, and we realized that small, well-planned gardens can be an attractive way to enjoy the outdoors.The first thing we decided to plant were things that would take a few years to mature. We chose a variety of fruiting trees, vines and shrubs that are disease resistant, hardy for our location, and have a variety of uses. In our front and side yards, we planted plum and cherry trees, which can stand up to our northwest winter winds, as well as a variety of shrubs and a birch tree that will attract wildlife. We planted hops vines and rhubarb for perennial food and flavoring. We didn’t want the chemicals our neighbor uses to be near anything we’ll eat, so we created an allée (a stand of lilacs in traditional French gardening; we’ve also planted dogwoods in ours) between our houses.In the backyard, we cut down some big trees on the southeast border and replaced them with a row of peach and cherry trees; the sensitive peach trees are in the most protected location we have. Several grapevines and highbush blueberries wrap around our deck, and two Precocious Hazelberts (a nut-producing shrub) are tucked under a tall oak tree. Native choke berries and winter berries will grow into a hedge along our shaded northwest boundary and provide winter food for birds.For the main vegetable garden, we wanted to expand on the success we had with our first three raised beds. The French have a tradition of laying out their potagers, or kitchen gardens, in attractive yet practical patterns. Following the advice of generations of organic farmers, including Eliot Coleman, we will rotate plant families through the beds to maintain soil fertility and foil disease organisms. At 3’x 8’, the beds are easy to reach across; 12-in.-deep soil drains well and warms up quickly in spring. The beds are arranged along a center aisle that’s wide enough to accommodate a garden cart, and there’s room enough between beds for a lawnmower.Trellises for tomatoes and cucumbers are easy to attach and reuse each year; growing vertically maximizes the sunlight and airflow these vigorous crops receive. Two “trench beds” complete the main garden; one for perennial flowers, which will attract beneficial insects; and one for potatoes this year, to be converted to more flowers next year. Instead of rototilling the beds each year, bringing weed seeds to the surface and destroying the soil’s texture, only the surface of the beds will be cultivated, followed with a topping of compost. The worms, fungi, and other organisms that live in the soil will toil for us relatively undisturbed, ferrying nutrients around and creating water-storing tunnels in the process.Behind the raised beds are perennial raspberry beds, and along the back and side fences are linear beds for peas, beans, and summer and winter squash vines. A planter next to our garden shed contains various mint plants, which would take over the yard if planted directly in the ground.We remind ourselves not to take all this too seriously, though. It is relaxing to wander among the plants in the evening to see what has changed and to ponder what we might do differently next year. Over time, our fruit trees will grow in, our gardening skills will improve, and our priorities will change. So far, it has been easy and fun to turn our backs on the conventional food system and do the most we can with what we have.last_img read more