Adityanath cracks whip on latecomers

first_imgFollowing reports of Noida Authority staff allegedly not reaching office on time, Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath on Monday sought the employee details of both Noida and Greater Noida Authorities.Mr. Adityanath also ordered that 73 employees of the Noida Authority, who had not been marking themselves present on biometric machine, be marked absent for the corresponding days. He also ordered that their salaries be deducted.Noida and Greater Noida Authority CEO Deepak Agarwal confirmed this. “The Chief Minister has asked for details such as the employees’ income, assets, ranks, tenure, departments, etc. While 40% of the staff members in the Greater Noida Authority have submitted their details, employees of the Noida Authority are yet to file the same,” said Mr. Agarwal.Plugging corruptionSoon after assuming office on March 19, Mr. Adityanath had directed Ministers and top officials to provide details of their income and assets within 15 days. He had said rooting out corruption in government offices was his main agenda. However, a majority of the officials failed to adhere to the deadline of April 7.Mr. Agarwal further said that to improve work culture in the authorities, he had asked the employees to mark their attendance on biometric machines. Failure to comply with the order would amount to strict action, he added.The Noida Authority had on March 23 installed biometric machines to crack down on employees who would reach office late. The Noida Authority’s offices are located in sectors 6, 5, 19 and 39. According to rules, the employees must reach office by 9:30 a.m. and not leave before 5 p.m. The two authorities work for five days a week. ‘30% staff absent’“During an inspection, I found that around 30% of the staff was absent. Whoever reaches office after 9:30 a.m. will be marked absent,” said Mr. Agarwal.Earlier, every employee had to sign on an attendance sheet. However, many would sign the sheet in the month-end. With the introduction of biometric attendance, the flaw was exposed. Explanation sought“We have also sought an explanation from those who were not present at 9:30 a.m.,” the CEO said.“If they will fail to furnish a satisfactory reply, we will take action against them. If absent employees are repeatedly absent, we will take departmental action against them,” he added.last_img read more

Chief Parliamentary Counsel Working on Amendments to Road Traffic Act

first_img The Minister was responding to comments from Opposition Spokesman on Transport, Mikael Phillips, during his contribution to the debate on the Road Traffic (Temporary Ticket Amnesty) Bill in the House of Representatives on Tuesday (July 11). Minister of Transport and Mining, Hon. Mike Henry, says the Office of the Chief Parliamentary Counsel is still working on changes to the Road Traffic Act, and assures that the legislation will be before the Lower House in short order. Story Highlightscenter_img Minister of Transport and Mining, Hon. Mike Henry, says the Office of the Chief Parliamentary Counsel is still working on changes to the Road Traffic Act, and assures that the legislation will be before the Lower House in short order.“The Chief Parliamentary Counsel department is still not finished (working) on the Bill… some 345 changes (are)… being implemented. I did say we intend to hasten that position, and I am advised that we should be getting (the Bill) not very long from now,” he said.The Minister was responding to comments from Opposition Spokesman on Transport, Mikael Phillips, during his contribution to the debate on the Road Traffic (Temporary Ticket Amnesty) Bill in the House of Representatives on Tuesday (July 11).Mr. Phillips had raised concern that the legislation was still not passed, despite debate on the Bill having started more than five months ago.The updated law will repeal and replace the existing 1938 Act, and will establish new offences as well as provide increased penalties for current wrongdoings.Under the Road Traffic (Temporary Ticket Amnesty) Bill, which was passed, delinquent motorists have been granted an opportunity to pay fines on outstanding traffic tickets, without incurring a penalty or interest, through an amnesty scheduled to run from August 2 to October 31.The amnesty will affect tickets issued from September 1, 2010 to July 31, 2017.last_img read more

Rice building Texas fastest academic supercomputer

first_imgAddThis ShareDACONTACT: Jade BoydPHONE:(713) 348-6778EMAIL: jadeboyd@rice.eduRICE BUILDING TEXAS’ FASTEST ACADEMICSUPERCOMPUTERRice Terascale Cluster Among the World’s Fastest UniversityComputersRice University hassecured grant funding from the National Science Foundation and Intel Corporationto build a supercomputer that will rank among the world’s fastest.When fully operationalnext year, the Rice Terascale Cluster (RTC) will be approximately three timesfaster than any university computer in Texas. The RTC will consist of at least70 interconnected servers containing the powerful new Intel” Itanium” 2processor.Housed at Rice’sComputer and Information Technology Institute (CITI), RTC will be the firstuniversity computer in Texas with a peak performance of 1 teraflop, or 1trillion floating-point operations per second (FLOPs), the standard measure ofsupercomputer performance. The total cost for RTC is undetermined. Fundingincludes $1.15 million from the NSF.Were it operationaltoday, RTC would rank among the 10 fastest academic supercomputers in thecountry and the top 25 university computers worldwide, according to www.top500.org, a semi-annual ranking of theworld’s top supercomputers that is compiled by researchers at the University ofTennessee and Germany’s University of Mannheim.The fastestsupercomputer in Texas, according to the list, is the University of Texas atAustin’s IBM Regatta-HPC Cluster, which has a peak performance of one-third of ateraflop.Scientists need fastercomputers to tackle increasingly complex mathematical problems that wouldrequire weeks or months to compute on existing machines. For example, toprecisely map the movements of every atom in a large molecule, researchers needto develop a complex mathematical model that contains thousands of variables.Such models are useful for drug designers and biomedical researchers, and awhole new scientific discipline known as bioinformatics has been created tosolve this and other complex biological computations. Increasingly, researchacross academic disciplines requires a similar level of complex computation, andit also requires a new generation of distributed software.“Rice faculty fromdisciplines as diverse as biochemistry, earth science, economics, neuroscience,computer science and political science will use RTC in their research,” saidMoshe Vardi, RTC principal investigator and CITI director. “It will also be avital tool for basic computational research aimed at better designing softwarethan can run on hundreds or even thousands of processorssimultaneously.”Rice’s proposal for NSFfunding for RTC faced stiff competition in a process that saw awards for justone-in-three applicants. Rice won based on independent evaluations by reviewerswho praised CITI’s expertise in high-performance computing, theinterdisciplinary nature of CITI research, and the caliber of the facultyinvolved.Complex research alreadyslated for RTC includes simulations of biomolecular interactions, the physics ofheavy ion collisions, simulations of Internet-based computer applicationsrunning on hundreds of computers, and simulations that aim to better understandand predict international conflicts.RTC is slated to beginoperation in early 2003. Tentative plans call for the cluster to include 70interconnected HP servers, each containing four 900-megahertz, Itanium 2processors. The cluster will have more than 500 gigabytes of RAM, and it will belinked to a 1 terabyte array of dedicated hard drives.According towww.top500.org, most of the fastest supercomputers, including the world’sfastest — the 35.9-teraflop NEC Earth Simulator in Japan — and the UnitedStates’ fastest — the 7.2-teraflop ASCI White-Pacific at Lawrence LivermoreNational Laboratory in California — are operated by private or government-runresearch laboratories. See for the Top 500 list of supercomputers.last_img read more