Giovanna Grossi: The four most common mistakes hoteliers make

first_imgGood eye contact, a smile, engagement are very important. It is important to ask open-ended questions instead of closed-ended ones – “what was your journey like” is much more open than “was your journey pleasant”. Giovanna will present the four most common mistakes made by hoteliers. Second mistake: Treat all guests equally Source: Booking.com For many guests, especially due to the growth of online bookings in recent years, the first real interaction with the hotel will be when they arrive. The first 30 or 60 seconds are the most important – then they form their opinion about the hotel, and many hoteliers fail to take advantage of the opportunity. Mistake XNUMX: Insufficient investment in staff One way to motivate staff is to invest in them. If you invest in their development and let them know that they are valued, the staff will be satisfied. Hotel staff should be part of the collective. It is very important that different departments connect and communicate with each other. Hotels should provide new employees with insight into the activities and operations of all departments. Guests expect every employee to know what is going on at the hotel. You cannot consider guests numbers, but have to treat them as individuals – each guest has different needs. You have to understand them. Imagine that at one table in a hotel restaurant you have a group of business partners, and at the other a married couple celebrating their wedding anniversary. Those two tables certainly won’t want the same treatment. Business people generally like sleek service and don’t want to be bothered by frequent requests for satisfaction. It is more likely that a married couple will want more attention. Encourage your teams to find out as much as possible about the guests, but they must be careful not to be intrusive.center_img Hotel expert Giovanna Grossi has joined AA for the first time, a prestigious British brand that has been monitoring and recommending hotels for more than 110 years. Starting as an inspector, she progressed ten years into an inspection team leader, accumulating a wealth of experience. She is also part of the AA Awards jury and, in a new way, is a participant in Sauce Intelligence, a consulting company for hotels and restaurants. Cleanliness is always one of the most important things for guests. No one wants to stay in a dirty hotel. It is, however, a broader process than cleaning rooms. Guests do not want to see cigarette butts in front of the hotel or a pile of papers at reception. Equally, they don’t want to see leftover food at the table from previous guests or use a fork and knife that aren’t polished. Hotel maintenance also implies the responsibility of each employee to report problems related to the hotel. Mistake Three: Misunderstanding room maintenance First mistake: Scheduling a welcome It is important to develop team spirit. If your staff is fully trained to work and works well, they will feel good which will result in their confidence in providing services. And satisfied staff includes satisfied guests. It’s like when a friend visits you. You will not only open the door and greet him, but you will smile and engage around him. The same principle applies to hotels. These first moments should be warm and welcoming, whether you are staying in an international, branded five-star hotel or a less rural two- or three-star estate.last_img read more

Wolf Administration Prepares for Winter Weather

first_img March 12, 2017 Press Release,  PSA,  Weather Safety Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today reminded Pennsylvanians to prepare for the coming winter weather, and assured residents that state agencies are taking steps to ensure they and local communities are ready to respond and prepared for the worst.“State agencies are taking proactive steps to ensure Pennsylvania is ready for the incoming winter weather and Pennsylvanians should take their own precautions and prepare for adverse conditions, especially for travel,” Governor Wolf said. “We are preparing for the most significant part of the storm to hit the Eastern half of the state from Monday night into Tuesday’s commute. I ask residents and commercial drivers across the commonwealth to prepare to avoid unnecessary travel on roadways during this time – as to let road crews and emergency responders do their jobs and minimize dangerous travel.”State agencies, including Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency, PennDOT, State Police and the Pennsylvania National Guard, are coordinating to ensure resource needs can be met throughout the commonwealth and formulating plans to increase resources in areas forecasted to be hit hardest by the storm.An emergency declaration for the storm has not yet been issued but the Governor will be prepared to do so should agencies need one as they assess needs statewide over the next 24 hours. Travel restrictions for personal and commercial drivers may also be put in place tomorrow evening into Tuesday should they be necessary to minimize dangerous travel.This is a complex winter storm system that will first impact southern and western Pennsylvania by Monday evening. The storm will overspread the state overnight, with heavy and blowing snow at times. Snow will continue throughout the day on Tuesday before tapering off during the evening hours for many.  Snow showers will continue for parts of Pennsylvania through Wednesday. With more than a foot of snow forecasted for much of the state, citizens should be aware that hazards associated with this storm include treacherous travel due to heavy and blowing snow, as well as possible utility outages and downed trees.“We are preparing for significant snow and winds and the impacts that those conditions could have on travel and public safety during and after the storm,” said Richard D. Flinn Jr., director of the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency. “This is the time between now and when the storm arrives for residents to ensure they have emergency supplies and stocking up on anything that they may need over a period of adverse weather.”Flinn said the Commonwealth Response Coordination Center at PEMA headquarters outside Harrisburg will activate at 10 p.m. on Monday with staff from PEMA and other state agencies, and residents should also do what they can to be ready and have emergency supplies on hand at home. To learn more about how to prepare for winter storms, please visit here.Motorists can check conditions on more than 40,000 roadway miles, including color-coded winter conditions on 2,900 miles by visiting http://www.511PA.com. PennDOT’s Automated Vehicle Locator plow tracking tool is available for all of the more than 2,200 PennDOT-owned and rented plow trucks, with vehicle locations viewable on 511PA.“Our team is prepared and will work around the clock during the storm to keep roads as safe as possible,” said PennDOT Secretary Leslie S. Richards. “We urge the public to think of safety first and avoid travel during the storm unless it is absolutely necessary.”Drivers can take the following steps to ensure safety for themselves and others during adverse weather:Monitor weather forecasts and postpone travel if necessary, especially over long distances during the storm.Slow down while driving when snow is falling and always wear your seat belt. Leave plenty of distance between you and the vehicles you are following.During squalls or whiteouts, do not stop on the roadway. Come to a complete stop only when you can safely get as far off the road as possible or when there is a safe area to do so.When encountering plows, stay at least six car lengths behind an operating plow truck and remember that the main plow is wider than the truck.When a plow is approaching you, move as far from the center of the road as is safely possible and remember that snow can obscure the actual snow plow width.Free emergency preparedness information, including templates for family emergency plans and checklists for emergency kit supplies, is available at www.ReadyPA.org. Follow @ReadyPA on Twitter and like ReadyPA on www.facebook.com/BeReadyPA for more emergency preparedness information. Wolf Administration Prepares for Winter Weathercenter_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Blue Devils potent offense overwhelms Badgers

first_imgIt is very rare for an opposing team to leave the Kohl Center victorious. It’s even more rare for an opposing team to shoot a high percentage en route to a victory at the Kohl Center.But Wednesday night, the No. 4 Duke Blue Devils did just that on their way to a 80-70 victory over No. 2 Wisconsin as part of the Big Ten/ACC challenge.Duke’s sharp shooting lasted for all 40 minutes of the game, and no matter what the Badgers did defensively, there seemed to be no stopping any of the Duke players from getting the ball in the basket.In the first half, Duke shot an impressive 15-25 (60 percent) overall from the field and 5-9 (55.6 percent) from behind the arc. With that shooting performance, Duke headed into the locker room with a 35-32 advantage despite not shooting a single free throw for the entire first 20 minutes.“Our offensive efficiency was incredible tonight,” Duke head coach Mike Krzyzewski said. “We had a lot of different lineups out there, but our kids were ready and they never backed down. They showed great composure.”Duke’s hot start was headed by their starting backcourt consisting of freshman guard Tyus Jones and senior guard Quinn Cook. The tandem combined for 16 points on 6-9 (66.7 percent) shooting from the field and 4-6 (66.7 percent) from three-point range.“We took good shots overall and we’ve stressed taking good shots,” Krzyzewski said. “We are very patient, and we had a couple run outs [to the basket].”After a team shoots as well as Duke did in the first half, it’s rare that kind of a shooting performance will carry into the second half.However, the Blue Devils not only continued to find the bottom of the net in the second half, but they were finding even more success shooting the ball than the team did in the first half.In the final 20 minutes, Duke shot a seemingly improbable 15-21 (71.4 percent) from the field and 2-3 (66.7 percent) from three-point territory. This brought its shooting totals for the game to 30-46 (65.2 percent) from the field overall and 7-12 (58.3 percent) from behind the arc.“We can only control what we can control,” senior guard Traevon Jackson said. “Some shots that they got, they were just too comfortable, and we have to do a better job of making adjustments on the fly. Credit to them though, they hit some really tough shots.”Once again, it was Jones that led the Duke charge to the final buzzer. He built on his eight-point first half with an even better 14-point second half.Jones started the half by scoring six of Duke’s first eight points, and from there, there was no stopping the freshman on his way to a 22-point performance behind 7-11 (63.6 percent) shooting.It was Jackson who found himself guarding Jones for most of the game, and no matter what he or the rest of the Badgers did defensively, there was no getting in Jones’s way.“Good players are going make plays in big moments like that, and [Jones] played a heck of a game,” Jackson said.Jackson did all he could to keep Wisconsin in the game, as he scored a career-high 25 points on 7-12 (58.3 percent) shooting with 17 of his 25 coming in the second half, but it seemed that for every shot Jackson made, Duke made one right back. It got to the point where Duke’s accuracy, in the end, was too much for the Badgers to overcome.It wasn’t as if Wisconsin was giving the Blue Devils easy looks, either. Badger defenders contested most of the shots Duke took and the players had to work for nearly each and every one of their looks at the basket.The ball just seemed to roll in Duke’s favor whenever one of those tough shots went up.“I would say they hit some tough shots, but they have good enough players where they can do that at times,” Wisconsin head coach Bo Ryan said. “To have as many do it in the same night, that’s just not fair.”On a night where Duke was shooting as if it was in the team’s own practice gym, it’s sometimes better to accept it for what it is rather than searching for excuses.The Blue Devils put on a shooting clinic in the Kohl Center, and there didn’t seem to be anything Ryan, Jackson or anyone else could do about it.“I don’t care what anybody says,” Ryan said. “They were lights out.”last_img read more