Frosty feelings: Browns fans protest 0-16 season with parade

first_imgOSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ’a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Julius Erving released from hospital Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Scottie Thompson also worthy of Finals MVP, thinks Cone This was a day for fans to express frustration at their football team, and most of the anger was aimed at the Haslams, who bought the team in 2012 but have been unable to produce the winner they’ve promised.One fan held a sign that read: “Jimmy and Dee Go Jump in the Lake.” Another carried by a fan dressed as a bishop said: “Deliver us from Jimmy and Dee.”The biting cold may have deterred some fans from attending, but it did nothing to curb Cleveland’s creativity or sarcasm.Prompted by a fan with a bullhorn, one group of marchers chanted, “What do we want? Watchable football. When do we want it? Now.” There were floats, a few of them with obscene themes, fans wearing paper bags on their heads, and a Big Bird wearing Johnny Manziel’s jersey. A band played John Mellencamp’s “Hurts So Good,” a song that underscores the pain and passion Browns fans feel for a team whose glory days are long gone.For Chris McNeil, the day was a triumph for Cleveland.A season-ticket holder, McNeil became the event’s unintended organizer — and a pariah to some — when his sarcastic post on Twitter last season that the winless Browns “deserve a parade” spawned a revolt by some Cleveland fans.McNeil endured severe backlash by fans who felt he was only embarrassing a city that has taken its share of shots over the years.“No fights, no violence,” he said as the parade unfolded. “I didn’t have to wear a flak jacket, none of that would reflect badly upon us. I don’t think anybody’s looking at this thing and going, ‘look at these idiot Clevelanders who are celebrating 0-16’. I don’t think that’s the message. This is a clear message to those people (the Haslams) inside the building. That’s who we were looking for.”For obvious reasons, none of Cleveland’s players attended the event.However, defensive end Emmanuel Ogbah posted a message on Twitter critical of anyone who went. MOST READ Thousands of disgruntled Cleveland fans, some of them calling for owners Dee and Jimmy Haslam to sell the franchise or jump in Lake Erie, paraded once around the team’s stadium in frigid conditions Saturday following a historic 0-16 season.It was a protest and it was a party as fans showed their outrage and creativity following a season many would gladly forget.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkDespite wind chills below zero, fans lined the street around FirstEnergy Stadium, which has been dubbed the “Factory of Sadness” in recent years, to cheer as 80 vehicles, a rock band on a flatbed truck and a group carrying 28 tombstones to represent the team’s 28 starting quarterbacks since 1999, took a “no victory” lap.Cleveland police conservatively estimated the crowd at 3,200, and reported no major incidents or arrests. Brian Heruela arrival bolsters Phoenix backcourt, defense Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ’a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Meralco ‘never the same’ after Almazan injury in PBA Finalscenter_img This was frozen fun mixed with some fury.“I’m here to protest,” said Patty Szylakowski, who grew up in a football-loving household with five brothers. “We don’t deserve this. We deserve better people in the front office.“We deserve better people coaching and we deserve better players. We’re buying Browns gear every year. We support them every year no matter what. Something has to be done and this is not a black eye on Cleveland.“Every fan in all the NFL cities should be thinking about this. If they got crap like we did, they would be doing the same thing.”That was the overriding sentiment among the frosted faithful who gathered on the sidewalks just feet away from a statue honoring legendary Browns running back Jim Brown.ADVERTISEMENT Redemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie Thompson Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Jiro Manio arrested for stabbing man in Marikina LATEST STORIES Judy Ann’s 1st project for 2020 is giving her a ‘stomachache’ Cleveland Browns fans hold up gravestones with names of Browns quarterbacks during the “Perfect Season” parade, Saturday, Jan. 6, 2018, in Cleveland. The Browns became the second team in NFL history to lose 16 games in a season. In joining the 2008 Detroit Lions in a shameful loser’s club, the Browns have found a new low in what has been nearly two decades of disgrace since returning as an expansion franchise in 1999. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)CLEVELAND — Chanting through chattering teeth, Browns fans finally felt victorious.Maybe the winless season wasn’t a total loss.ADVERTISEMENT “That parade is a joke,” he wrote. “Don’t call yourself a true browns fan if you go to that thing! Going 0-16 was embarrassing enough as a player. That is like adding fuel to the fire and it is completely wrong!”McNeil’s only goal was to give Browns fans a voice. He felt he had done just that.“This stuff matters in this town,” said McNeil, who is donating nearly $15,000 raised for the event to the Cleveland Food Bank. “That’s why I care about this stuff. I almost get choked up when I think about it, because people don’t realize that. You go to other markets, and people enjoy their teams and I get that. But there’s a connection here where it’s like family. And to see something like the Browns be bad, it’s easy for me to make jokes, it’s either you do that or you cry.“But then you look at something like this and you say, ‘Man, we had this. In the ’80s, this is when you’d leave a ballgame. I remember that. As a kid I’d be sitting in the backseat people honking, people yelling. You’d see that all the time after wins. To get that, we have to create this parade. It just says so much about the character of this city, the character of the people here.“This is all positive and fun.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next View commentslast_img read more

10 Highest (and Lowest) Paying States for Video Editors

first_imgWashington$50,000 Florida$46,000 Hawaii$31,000 New Hampshire$49,000 Iowa$48,000 Vermont$44,000 Colorado$44,000 Connecticut$49,000 Pennsylvania$47,000 West Virginia$46,000 Virginia$49,000 Montana$44,000 Oklahoma$45,000 Indiana$47,000 Nevada$38,000 Michigan$50,000 Massachusetts$59,000 New Jersey$53,000 Maine$44,000 Georgia$56,000 Arizona$41,000 Ohio$47,000 Illinois$56,000 South Carolina$48,000 Missouri$48,000 Maryland$51,000 Nebraska$36,000 North Carolina$47,000 Kansas$45,000 Alaska$37,000 Kentucky$42,000 Mississippi$51,000 Rhode Island$45,000 Alabama$50,000 North Dakota$44,000 California$53,000 South Dakota$37,000 Minnesota$43,000 Of course these results don’t factor in the cost of living and buying power, but they do show where demand for video editors is still high. The national average salary for video editors is $49,000.All salary information is courtesy of Indeed.com.Where does your state fall? Share in the comments below. Are you a video editor in one of the highest or lowest paying states? See how your local area stacks up.Video editing is a super competitive field. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics, between now and 2022 the industry is only projected to add 200 jobs. The post production field will only get more competitive in the years to come. So we thought it’d be helpful to see the places where demand is still high and video editors are paid well.We’ve examined all 50 states to determine the top 10 highest/lowest paying states for video editors. All the amounts are displayed as yearly salaries before tax.10 Highest Paying States1. New York $60,000With an endless supply of shooting locations New York is a filmmakers dream. Home to dozens of national TV networks, New York tops our list as the state where video editors can expect to make the most money. New York also ranks as the second best place to be a filmmaker in 2014 according to Moviemaker.com.2. Massachusetts $59,000Driven by the Boston area, Massachusetts comes in at the second best place for film editors. Massachusetts has claim to over 60 academy award nominated films. On top of it’s rich history, productions in Massachusetts have increased 150% in the last few years.3. Georgia $56,000Home to such projects as The Walking Dead, X-Men: First Class, and Mean Girls 2, Georgia is an emerging giant in the filmmaking community. Production companies invested over $3.3 billion in the Georgia film industry in 2013 alone. Qualifying productions also receive a 30% tax credit so you can be sure that the film industry will continue to grow in Georgia.4. Illinois $56,000In line with Georgia, Illinois offers a 30% tax credit for all qualifying productions. Illinois also pays 30% of your salary back if you make over $100,000 a year as an editor. So if you live in Chicago you might want to ask your boss for a raise!5. New Jersey $53,000New Jersey may come as a shock, but the Garden State is no stranger to film. Serving as home to such classic movies as Friday the Thirteenth and the Amityville Horror, New Jersey has a long history with the film industry. Spillover from New York also accounts for a lot of editing jobs in New Jersey.6. California – $53,000 7. Maryland –  $51,000 8. Mississippi –  $51,000 9. Washington – $50,000 10. Alabama – $50,00010 Lowest Paying States50. Hawaii $31,000Serving as the location for Jurassic Park and Lost, Hawaii bottoms our list due to it’s expensive location mixed with a lack of jobs. In fact, our quick research found that there isn’t even one video editing job open in Hawaii. A $500 one-way flight from LA also makes it a pretty expensive place to visit and shoot.49. Idaho $33,000Idaho offers beautiful countryside but little production and post-production jobs. Idaho offers no tax credit to filmmakers making it fiscally irresponsible for many productions to shoot here.48. Nebraska $36,000Nebraska is not a good place for film and a quick glance at their film commission website tells you everything you need to know. Although this state was home to the recent Alexander Payne film Nebraska it still has an embarrassingly small filmography.47. Alaska $37,000It’s not easy living in Alaska, especially if you’re a video editor. The Last Frontier offers some of the most beautiful landscape on earth. However, due to cost most editing work is outsourced to other states.46. South Dakota $37,000South Dakota is home to Mount Rushmore and perhaps the worst film commission website in history. What South Dakota lacks in filmmaking history it makes up for in picturesque landscape. In fact a 20% tax credit makes South Dakota an appealing state for filmmakers to look at.45. Nevada – $38,000 44. Utah –  $38,000 43. Arizona – $41,000 42. Wyoming – $41,000 41. Kentucky – $42,000You’re state not in the top or bottom 10? Check out the full list of salaries from all 50 states:Video Editing Salaries by State Tennessee$45,000 Idaho$33,000 Wyoming$41,000 Louisiana$43,000 Utah$38,000 New York$60,000 Arkansas$49,000 New Mexico$43,000 Wisconsin$44,000 Texas$48,000 Oregon$47,000last_img read more

After Effects Video Tutorial: Syncing Cartoon Lips

first_imgMake your animations more realistic! Learn how to sync cartoon lips in this After Effects Tutorial.If you’ve ever tried to sync cartoon lips in After Effects it can be a very frustrating task, especially if you are trying to make it look natural. Syncing lips to audio requires a lot of time and patience, but there are a few techniques you can use to speed up the entire process.In the following After Effects video tutorial we’ll show you how to animate the lips of your cartoons. For this tutorial you will need to create your own character in Adobe Illustrator. The tutorial covers:Working with WaveformsAnimating Mouth LayersCorrect Mouth PositionsImporting Illustrator FilesIn order to shape your lips the right way I highly recommend checking out a few lip syncing diagrams on the Internet. While you certainly don’t need a new lip animation every frame, adding more keyframes will give your lips a more “natural” look.Need music for your next big animation project? Check out the cartoon section here at PremiumBeat.What did you think of this tutorial? Have any questions? Share in the comments below.last_img read more

TSR commandant held in Tripura scribe’s murder case

first_imgPolice on Wednesday arrested commandant of the Tripura State Rifles (TSR) Tapan Debbarma, in connection with the killing of senior journalist Sudip Datta Bhowmik at the 2nd battalion headquarters near here on Tuesday. His personal bodyguard Nandalal was earlier arrested for shooting down the journalist allegedly on the instructions of the commandant.Both the accused booked under IPC Sections 302, 109 and 27 of the Arms Act were sent to police remand for a period of 10 days when they were produced before the west Tripura Chief Judicial Magistrate. They have been kept at a city police station for interrogation by the CID, which has been entrusted with the investigation.Initial interrogation of accused rifleman Nandalal revealed that the killing of Mr. Bhowmik occurred inside the office chamber of Mr. Tapan. “He told us that despite his reluctance the commandant forced him to open fire,” a police officer told The Hindu on condition of anonymity.“After firing a single shot from his AK 47 automatic weapon, Nandalal became nervous and hurriedly left the room leaving the journalist in a pool of blood. The commandant let the critically wounded journalist die without medical attention.”The senior crime reporter had written 11 articles in daily Syandan Patrika against massive financial irregularities in the 2nd battalion of TSR.last_img read more

Understanding the Brahmaputra and the annual flooding in Assam

first_imgSand is being dug from the river Brahmaputra due to massive siltation in the water ways in the outskirts of Guwahati on November 25, 2015. Gulzarilal Nanda, Union Planning Minister, visit a rapid survey of flood and erosion-affected areas of Assam on August 22, 1954. Photo shows the Union Minister (third from right) looking at the swirling Brahmaputra at Palasbari about 14 miles from Guwahati.  | Photo Credit: The Hindu Archives The permanent destruction of wetlands in the State has also been contributing to the deluge. File The massive earthquake that ravaged Assam on Independence Day that year not only claimed over 1,000 lives, but also changed the course of the mighty Brahmaputra. The riverbed rose as the mountains shook, and what had been a stable course became a constantly shifting one eroding the banks.This especially increased the amount of silt carried by the river and its tributaries. The silt was deposited on the banks downstream, and on the riverbed. Due to this heavy deposition, the river “frequently changes its course with the main channel flowing into multiple channels” hitting the river bank causing further erosion, a study published in 2014 by the Civil Engineering Department, Royal Group of Institutions explains.The riverbed area of the Brahmaputra has increased by more than 50 per cent through erosion since the quake. According to a report on climate change published by the government of Assam in September 2015, erosion has destroyed more than 3,800 square kilometres of farmland, which is nearly half the size of Sikkim, since 1954. Due to erosion, the riverbed area has expanded from around 3,870 sq.km. estimated between 1916 and 1928 to 6,080 sq.km. in 2006. Based on the civil engineering report, between 1954 and 2008 about 4,27,000 hectares has been eroded at the rate of 8,000 hectares per year.  Controlling the floodsOne of the main methods used in the State to control floods is embankments, but almost every year the Brahmaputra and the Barak breach their banks, inundating agricultural land and houses. “The most recent embankments are 25 years old,” says Himanshu Thakkar, coordinator of the South Asia Network on Dams, Rivers and People. “Checking embankments before monsoon should be done as we never know where it will be breached. When the flow is extreme, erosion capacity is greater,” he adds.In August this year, the State government announced that as many as five dredgers will be used to deepen the Brahmaputra, and the harvested silt will be used to construct the 725-km Brahmaputra Expressway along both banks of the river. In an earlier report, the Chief Minister Sarbananda Sonowal told The Hindu: “We believe it will not only improve the water-carrying capacity of the Brahmaputra, but also make the river navigable for bigger cargo ships. That used to be the case before Independence.”Sanjoy Hazarika, director of the Commonwealth Human Rights Initiative is unconvinced. He is for an engineering assessment, along with environment assessment, as dredging “might change the course of river.” Mr. Thakkar adds that the way dredging is done followed by the construction of highway on both banks will determine the changes the river will see.The Brahmaputra Board, under the Ministry of Water Resources, had suggested constructing dams in Assam and Arunachal Pradesh about 30 years ago, the Subansiri project being one of them. Subansiri was initially designed as a hydro-power and storage dam, which the board believed would help reduce the impact of floods. However, it was later transformed into just a hydroelectric project aimed at generating 2000 megawatts of electricity, which invited opposition from local people and environment scientists.There is the possibility that hydro electric projects can worsen the situation. “Ranganadi project is a classic example of damage caused by the dam in downstream,” Mr. Thakkar points out. The dam in Arunachal Pradesh — part of a hydro-electric project — is on the Ranganadi tributary of Brahmaputra. During winter the river barely exists, but during monsoon it swells up, inundating villages. The All Assam Students’ Union in July this year demanded demolition of the Ranganadi hydro project, alleging that release of water by the North Eastern Electric Power Corp. on July 11 without prior notice affected hundreds of thousands of people in Lakhimpur and Majuli, media reported.  A similar story was told by Nishikant Deka, 80, of Gorubandha, a village about 40 km from Guwahati. He and his 12-member family had to evacuate their house in neck-deep water and take shelter at a naamghar (public prayer hall). They managed to carry some rice, and food provided once in a while by NGOs kept them going. The head of the house described how almost every year the family has to reconstruct the bamboo home that floodwaters destroy.The government of Assam estimates that 2,753 human lives have been lost along with 6,73,329 cattle and the total losses due to floods and erosion amount to nearly ₹4659.472 crore. Flooding this year took the lives of 157 people and destroyed hundreds of acres of land. According to the state disaster management authorities, in the past five years, flooding has killed about 500 people. | Photo Credit: Ritu Raj Konwar The permanent destruction of wetlands in the State has also been contributing to the deluge. Assam is home to more than 3,000 wetlands and many varieties of flora and fauna. “Wetlands, locally known as beels, act as reservoirs and rejuvenating them before monsoon can help in mitigating flood in parts of the state,” said Dulal Chandra Goswami, former head of department of environmental science at Guwahati University.“Wetlands play a very significant role as natural reservoirs of water that absorb part of the flood waters from the nearby rivers through their connected channels and also from surface runoff,” Mr. Goswami explains. Most of these wetlands are in derelict condition mainly due to human-induced factors such as encroachment for agriculture or infrastructure development.“To mitigate floods, any potential practical solution should be based on an integrated, multidisciplinary basin management plan focused on water and soil conservation together with geo-environmental, eco-biological and socio-cultural integrity of the basin,” Mr. Goswami says. “The basin management approach is essential in view of the interstate as well as international character of most of the tributaries and the mainstream.”Effects of Climate ChangeCompounding the issue of an unpredictable Brahmaputra, are the effects of climate change. “Climate change will result in more frequent and severe floods, which will increase the costs of reconstruction and maintenance on state infrastructure, including roads, irrigation, water and sanitation,” says the report on climate change published by the Assam government.According to the study, by 2050, the average annual runoff of the river Brahmaputra will decline by 14 per cent. However, there is a risk of glaciers melting, leading to flash floods.As the economy of Assam is largely dependent on natural resources, what happens with agriculture and forests has direct effects on the livelihood of its people. During floods, water becomes contaminated, and climate change has a direct impact on the water resources sector by increasing the scarcity of freshwater, which is a constant problem in summer.“The predicted increase in average temperature and decrease in the number of rainy days due to climate change will further stress water resources,” the report points out.The study goes on to say that heavier rainfall replacing continuous low or normal rainfall during monsoon might lead to flash floods in low-lying areas. This will also reduce the groundwater recharge. | Photo Credit: Ritu Raj Konwar  Change in approachWhile the present approach towards flood has been immediate relief, much more need to be done before torrential rains hit the State during monsoon. The short-term measures on which flood management in the State presently depends, such as rebuilding the breached embankments, are largely inadequate.Besides, more accurate and decentralised forecasts of rain can help in improving preparedness. “Weather reports should be made available on district level and should be accessible to public,” says Mr. Thakkar of the South Asia Network on Dams, Rivers and People. “Information should be available in local languages. With the forecast in, one can calculate how much more water will flow downstream, thereby alerting people in advance to evacuate. The nature of rivers is such that there is no way one can flood-proof whole of Assam so one has to keep it mind that floods will happen.”He adds that the water flow information shared by China on the Brahmaputra with India, for which India pays a certain amount, should also be shared with the public, as this will help in understanding the river better and therefore help people better prepare for floods.As the research scholars point out, studying the river and the impact of climate change is a must to understand why the state gets flooded every year. As line in a famous Assamese song goes: “Luitar parore ami deka lora; moribole bhoi nai (We are the youths from the banks of the Luit [Brahmaputra]; we are not afraid of death),” people in the Valley seems to be living by the same spirit. The human costLalita Biswas, 30, a daily wage earner at a brick factory in Morigaon, Assam, had to leave her submerged house in a village in Morigaon in a boat provided by villagers and take shelter in an open space on a nearby hillock. She was living in a polythene tent with her husband, who also works at the brick factory, and children. Her children have suffered from colds and fevers, and her family did not receive any help from the government, she said.“We’re always neglected because we are poor,” she said when asked if she had received any help from the state authorities. Ms. Biswas wasn’t alone. About 100 people climbed the hills to escape the flood and have to rebuild their houses and lives.Also Read All you need to know about Assam floods Marooned houses in the flood affected Morigaon district of Assam. “The river was swollen the morning after the earthquake, which seemed to last for an eternity. We saw fallen trees in it, people and animals flailing, dead bodies of people and animals that were carried on the strong current.”Krishna Chawla (née Das) was 13 when a strong earthquake that lasted about eight minutes jolted Assam and adjacent areas on the evening of August 15, 1950.The Brahmaputra River, which was always “eating away at parts of the state,” looked terrifying, she recollects. “All of us students went to help build embankments the next day, and while I was passing a bag full of sand to a fellow student, I saw the river take away the house I was born in. The house collapsed, and I stood there paralysed,” said Ms. Chawla, the daughter of a forest officer in Dibrugarh. | Photo Credit: Ritu Raj Konwarlast_img read more