Man fined over incident after drinking ‘north of 20 shots of vodka’

first_imgA MILFORD man who consumed ’somewhere north of 20 shots of vodka’ has been fined for a public order incident.Lee McLaughlin (24) of 4 Moyle Road, Milford, was before Letterkenny District Court over an incident at Port Road, Letterkenny on September 15 last. Sergeant Jim Collins told the Court that Gardaí observed McLaughlin stepping into a fight between two females and pushing one of them.McLaughlin became abusive shouting ‘f*** off’ to members of the public and was arrested by Gardaí.Solicitor for McLaughlin, Mr Rory O’Brien, said his client had no recollection of the night in question due to his ‘high level of inebriation’.“He had a complete and utter black out,” Mr O’Brien said. “He drank a ridiculous amount, somewhere north of 20 shots of vodka. It was remarkable that he was standing.”Mr O’Brien said that McLaughlin, accompanied in Court by family members, wanted to apologise for his behaviour.Judge Paul Kelly warned McLaughlin that he was in a downward spiral and needed to ‘get a grip’.McLaughlin was fined €150 and given four months to pay.Man fined over incident after drinking ‘north of 20 shots of vodka’ was last modified: November 10th, 2019 by Chris McNultyShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Judge Paul KellyLee McLaughlinLetterkenny District CourtMilfordlast_img read more

Groves lining up world title challenge

first_imgGeorge Groves intends to face the winner of next month’s world title clash between Arthur Abraham and Robert Stieglitz.The pair meet in Germany for Abraham’s WBO belt – a week after Groves takes on Mouhamed Ali Ndiaye at Wembley Arena for the vacant European super-middleweight crown.Groves was due to fight Stieglitz – then the WBO champion – last March but was forced to withdraw from the bout because of an injury.Stieglitz subsequently lost to Abraham and unbeaten Commonwealth champion Groves is in line to take on the winner of their rematch.The 24-year-old from Hammersmith is the WBO’s number one contender and therefore the mandatory challenger.Groves said: “With me being number one in the WBO that is the direction that I’m going in and I’ve got to keep an eye on these guys as I’ll be looking to fight the winner next.“I’m focused on the fight in hand first, though, against Ndiaye, and winning the European title. But once I come through that I want to be in Germany to see Abraham against Stieglitz up close.“I was gutted when I couldn’t take on Stieglitz last year as I’m confident I would have beaten him as Abraham went on to do, and I’d be the world champion now. But my time will come.”Groves v Ndiaye is on 16 March and features as chief support on a card joint-headlined by WBO lightweight champion Ricky Burns’ unification showdown against IBF champion Miguel Vazquez, and WBO light-heavyweight champion Nathan Cleverly’s defence against Robin Krasniqi.West Londoners Steve O’Meara, Gary Corcoran and Mitchell Smith are also due to feature on the bill.It will be screened on BoxNation (Sky channel 437/Virgin channel 546). Join at www.boxnation.comTickets are available from the Eventim box office on 0844 249 100 or eventim.co.uk and the Wembley Arena box office on 0844 815 0815 or wembleyarena.co.ukSee also:Dominant Groves easily sees off JohnsonGroves tipped to win world title in 2013Groves set to fight for European title Groves to fight for title at Wembley ArenaTrio in action on Groves’ Wembley bill The press conference to announce Groves’ Wembley returnTrainer Booth discusses George Groves’ European title fightGroves ready to add European belt to his title collectionGroves warned ahead of title 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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Half-time: Nottingham Forest 2 Fulham 1

first_imgRoss McCormack’s stunning free-kick gave Fulham hope of salvaging something after a disastrous start saw them concede twice inside 21 minutes. Both goals were disputed by the Whites, who claimed Britt Assombalonga handled the first and felt his second from the penalty spot came following a fair challenge by Shaun Hutchinson on Michail Antonio.Controversy aside, Nottingham Forest’s lead was harsh on bottom-of-the-table Fulham who had started well despite the ever-increasing pressure on manager Felix Magath.Home keeper Karl Darlow saved Tim Hoogland’s 20-yard shot and then just about stopped another long-range strike from McCormack.But Forest led when Assombalonga headed home Henri Lansbury’s free-kick and it was 2-0 when Assombalonga found the bottom corner from the penalty spot after Hutchinson appeared to have won a perfectly timed tackle on Antonio as he raced through on goal.But Fulham showed good spirit to pull a goal back when McCormack curled the ball over the wall and into the near post and they almost snatched an equaliser when Hugo Rodallega’s shot was cleared off the line by Eric Lichaj. Fulham: Kiraly; Bodurov, Hutchinson, Burn, Amorebieta; Hoogland, Parker, Fotheringham, Stafylidis; McCormack, Rodallega. Subs: Bettinelli, Eisfeld, Roberts, G. Williams, Hyndman, David, Kavanagh.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Darwin Still Rules from the Grave

first_imgDarwin died in 1882, but more than any other scientist, seems to live on in the science news.  Here are some recent examples.  The question is: do any of these articles really have anything to do with the theory that made him famous?  Or is some other dynamic at work that keeps him in the forefront? Darwinian funding:  Science magazine (11 November 2011: Vol. 334 no. 6057 pp. 753-754, doi: 10.1126/science.334.6057.753) lamented how the bad economy is affecting funding at the National Institutes of Health (NIH).  In “Darwinism vs. Social Engineering at NIH,” Jocelyn Kaiser wrote about the competition between labs.  “As National Cancer Institute Director Harold Varmus recently put it, NIH is weighing some type of ‘social engineering’ rather than simply letting ‘Darwinian forces’ cull weaker labs and shrink the number of mouths NIH feeds.”  It sounds like a metaphor of the battle between Intelligent Design and Survival of the Fittest, but surely she did not mean that medical labs are products of random, undirected mechanisms.  [News Flash: Darwinism is not a force.] Darwinian robots:  New Scientist committed a colossal non-sequitur in its short article, “Darwin trumps self-obsession in robotics.”  The point is that creating robots in our own image is doomed to fail.  A new generation of rebel roboticists, the editorial claims, is thinking that robots should be soft and squishy, “inspired by the theory that intelligence emerges from the body.”  Here was the ending non-sequitur: “Crucially, the next generation of robots will not be designed as if by gods – in our image – but by using the principles revealed by Darwin. Once again, evolution has dealt a blow to the idea that humans were created special.” Darwinian emotions:  The only one of these three articles that related specifically to Darwin’s theory was an update on his theory of emotions posted by the BBC News.  The Darwin Correspondence Project is trying to recreate his experiment nearly 150 years later, reporter Stephanie Hegarty wrote, “to test his results, and draw attention to his contribution to psychology.”  Hegarty gave him a pass: “It was somewhat unscientific by modern standards, with no control group and a very small sample, but it was revolutionary for its time.”  Darwin wanted to prove that facial expressions in response to emotion were innate and universal, and that “expression was a trait that humans shared with beasts.”  His results were published in his 1872 book, The Expression of Emotions in Man and Animals.  The BBC News article, however, drew no connection to his hunch and his theory of natural selection; nor did it seek to explain how facial expressions lead to fitness and survival.  Anyway, has the Darwin Correspondence Project replicated the results?  No; it’s a work in progress.  That didn’t stop Hegarty from heaping praise on Darwin with quotes from others who called him “an immense intellect” and “truly a genius” who “formed the basis for an entire canon of psychological study.” Darwinian weapons:  On the premise that “evolution is a simple fact” and “the fact of evolution itself is not disputed by any reputable scientist” (appealing to Coyne and Dawkins as authorities), Paula Kirby at The Washington Post took glee in skewering Christian conservatives as guilty of willful ignorance, because “Evolution Threatens Christianity.”  Without mentioning Darwin directly, she referred to two of his greatest defenders today.  This has long been a legacy of Darwinism: a tool to attack religion – and not just any religion, but Christianity.  Paula Kirby’s screed and New Scientist’s loony non-sequitur are so typical of the Darwin demagogues.  Their notion of scientific “truth” could not withstand a freshman course in philosophy of science.  The modus operandi of their ilk is: (1) hate Christians and conservatives first, then (2) appeal to the authority of Darwin and his disciples to call anyone who disagrees an ignoramus. Charles Darwin is the god of atheists and naturalists, the Bearded Buddha at whose shrine they offer their sacrifices.  For a balance to the worship and adoration given to the B.B. you need to read Jerry Bergman’s eye-opening book, The Dark Side of Charles Darwin (available at Amazon.com).  It’s amazing this troubled con-man ever became famous at all.  For instance, Bergman reveals that his photographs used for The Expression of Emotions in Man and Animals were faked (just one of many scientific sins he committed).  The guy was as bad as Haeckel, but got away with it, because of his gift of gab and manner of carefully cataloguing things to present a façade of scientific rigor, then telling stories that had little or nothing to do with the data or his theory (if it can even be called a theory), winning acceptance through association. Getting Moses out of science was really the goal.  It so appealed to other anti-religious disciples that, with the aid of his X-men like Huxley, they redefined science altogether as naturalism; something like Darwinism, therefore, had to be true – by definition!  Natural history became confabulation, scientific rigor, mortis.  The articles above show that his disciples completely misrepresent his ideas and portray “natural selection” as if it performs intelligent design miracles!  This is insane.  It’s time we expose the fraud of this flawed, disturbed man who has been morphed into a caricature of Moses leading science into a promised land.  They’re not in the promised land; they’re wandering aimlessly in Fantasyland.(Visited 18 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Tourism month kicks off in SA

first_imgThe iconic Table Mountain is a populartourist attraction. Tourism month aimsto encourage more South Africansto visit local destinations. September’s sunny skies and magnificent scenery don’t only mean springtime in South Africa – they also herald the start of a 30-day drive to boost domestic tourism in the country.Kicking off the campaign in Newtown, Johannesburg, on 27 August 2009, South Africa’s Minister of Tourism Marthinus van Schalkwyk said, “By travelling at home, South Africans contribute meaningfully to the tourism industry and its competitiveness, as well as to local economic growth and job creation.“Domestic and regional tourism is the backbone of a sustainable and robust tourism industry,” he added.According to the minister, the industry is booming in South Africa. In 2008 there were 42.5-million tourists in the country, of which 32.9-million, or 77%, were local. This helped the industry contribute R25.8-billion (US$3.3-billion) to the national GDP, an increase of 29% from the R20-billion ($2.6-billion) generated in 2007.Tourism also constitutes about 7% of employment in South Africa, both directly and indirectly.Sho’t left around the countryAt the tourism month launch in Newtown Van Schalkwyk unveiled the Sho’t Left billboard campaign, which aims to creatively motivate South Africans to travel within their own country.Relaunched in August 2007 by the government-funded body SA Tourism, the Sho’t Left drive aims to promote a culture of local holiday travel, targeting ordinary South Africans and their families who have a desire to see more of the country but don’t know where to go.“Sho’t Left” is derived from everyday South African “taxi lingo”. A commuter wanting a ride to a destination close by will say “Sho’t left, driva” – meaning, I want to jump off just around the corner.The 10 billboards, worth more than R2-million ($258 712), have been strategically placed around Gauteng province – the economic powerhouse of South Africa identified as the greatest source of domestic tourists.“As you travel your own country, you learn more about its diversity and tourism offerings. You also help to improve service levels and the competitiveness of the industry as a whole. This in turn makes all of us better hosts for regional and foreign visitors,” Van Schalkwyk said.“We are less than 300 days away from the 2010 Fifa World Cup, and now is the time for all of us to contribute in every way we can to make sure we offer the world an unmatched experience in our fantastic country.The minister announced that as part of the Sho’t Left campaign, SA Tourism has entered into a new deal with hotel groups, airlines and travel agencies to offer South Africans affordable rates when visiting local destinations.SA Tourism’s new partners include the Peermont Hotel group, Flight Centre travel agency and Computicket Travel booking centre.Celebrating diversitySouth Africa’s month-long drive will be wrapped on 27 September with the celebration of the annual World Tourism Day.For the past 30 years The United Nations World Tourism Organisation has used this day to raise global awareness about the important role that tourism can play, both socially and economically.This year’s theme for World Tourism Day is “Celebrating Diversity”, which explores cultural wealth and the importance of sustainable tourism in ensuring that local traditions thrive alongside those of other cultures.In South Africa, the Department of Tourism will put on celebrations in Kimberley in the Northern Cape province on 29 September.A fitting host for these celebrations, the Northern Cape is firmly committed to developing tourism.In 2008, in a bid to boost economic development, small tourism enterprise development, and job creation, the Northern Cape Department of Tourism, Environment and Conservation commissioned a tourism resource audit to develop and promote tourism within the province.The project aims to use information generated through surveys as a guiding a process whereby tourism businesses and attractions are clustered together, creating attractive regionalised tourism spread out across the province.Kimberley is synonymous with diamond mining in South Africa, which took off in 1871 and lead to unprecedented growth within the province.The town is known for its “Big Hole” – a tourist attraction in its own right – which, ironically, began as a small hill rich in diamonds, known as Colesberg Koppie.From the late 1800s until 1914 miners tirelessly toiled to remove some 25-million tons of earth from the site, turning the hill into a crater.An observation platform erected close to the site nowadays provides a good view of the “Big Hole”, which is about 365m deep and covers an area close on 15,5 hectares. During its productive years it yielded about 14.5-million carats of diamonds.De Beers, the world’s largest diamond-mining firm with operations now spread across the world, was founded in Kimberley and still has a prominent base in the town.Jumping on the tourism bandwagonSmaller tourism bodies across the country have also lent their support to tourism month by planning a range of special events.In Grahamstown, a small town in the Eastern Cape province made famous by its annual National Arts Festival, the local tourism office, Makana Tourism, is working hard to offer a number of exciting activities during September.“People forget that apart from providing information to tourists and marketing the area to potential tourists, the best tourists are the locals,” said Makana tourism director Willem Makkink, speaking to the town’s online portal Grahamstown.“We are planning a series of tours that will showcase the area. We hope to teach the residents of Makana [the name of the greater municipality incorporating Grahamstown] about the myriad of attractions and activities that are to be found here. We are planning tours of the town, the surrounding villages and sites, and the game reserves,” he said.In keeping with the theme of diversity, Cape Town in the Western Cape province will promote its melting pot of cultures and breathtaking scenery during tourism month through its “My Cape Town” campaign.This will incorporate a series of mini-profile documentaries which will explore the lives of people who live in Cape Town, and why they love the city. Local station Cape Town TV will flight these profiles at various times during the month.The city is also offering a photo competition during September, whereby residents are encouraged to take snaps of the sites that best embody the phrase, “This is the Cape Town I want the world to see”. Budding photographers can submit their entries via www.capetown.travel/worldtourismmonth and stand a chance of winning a cash prize of R15 000 ($2 000).In addition to being tourism month, September also marks a celebration of South Africa’s rich and diverse heritage. While Heritage Day is officially observed every year on 24 September, various relevant activities take place throughout the month, in the form of music, dance, arts and crafts, and literature.This year celebrations take place under the theme “Celebrating South African craft, our heritage”. In keeping with this year’s theme, the fourth World Summit on Arts and Culture will take place in Johannesburg from 22 to 25 September 2009, and will see crafters from across the world gathering there to discuss issues pertinent to the industry.last_img read more

Microblogging, Instant Messaging and More Comes to Open Text’s Social Enterprise Offerings

first_imgSocial Communities enables companies to create a variety of internal or external social media applications, such as blogs, wikis, forums, and social networks. It’s a part of Open Text CRM Suite, which was previously known as Vignette Community Applications and Services. Open Text acquired Vignette last year. Social Workplace – which recently highlighted by Info-Tech Research Group as one of the best enterprise collaboration platforms currently available – added microblogging and instant messaging to its mix of features, and improved its integration with Open Text ECM Suite and Open Text eDOCs. Social Workplace, previously known as Open Text Social Media, is also available as a stand-alone platform.Open Text faces competition from many players in both the ECM market and the social enterprise market.Screenshot courtesy of OpenText IT + Project Management: A Love Affair 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now klint finley Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… Tags:#enterprise#news#Products Related Posts Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of… Open Text, Canada’s largest software company, released two new social enterprise products this week: Open Text Content Server Pulse and Open Text Social Communities. The company also released a new version of its Open Text Social Workplace software, adding microblogging and instant messaging features.Pulse integrates social networking, status updates, and content collaboration into Open Text’s flagship content management offering Open Text ECM Suite. It also adds social features into existing ECM Suite installs while maintaining existing access controls and other configurations.last_img read more

The Facebook Phone & The Triumph Of Native Apps Over HTML5

first_imgThe Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology In the U.S., the average number of apps per smartphone user is 41. This is a 28% increase over the average from a year ago. Despite this increase, however, total time spent by users with apps has remained relatively flat: 39 minutes per day versus 37 minutes per day in 2011.As most people know Apple’s App Store and Google Play far outstrip competing platforms in the number of apps available.  Facebook will reveal this Thursday exactly what its “new home on Android” really means. If the company wants anyone to actually live in that new home, though, it had better be fully optimized for the Android platform. Smartphone users can be an unforgiving lot.(NOTE: According to Compuware, the survey involved 3,535 smartphone and tablet users (1,002 in the U.S., 509 in the U.K., 509 in France, 508 in Germany, 502 in India and 504 in Japan) over the past six months. The company claims it is a statistically projectable survey with a margin of error of +/- 1.6%.)Facebook photo courtesy of Shutterstock.  brian s hall Tags:#apps#Facebook#facebook apps#HTML5#mobile Web Ironically, the preference for apps over the Mobile Web places additional pressure on developers. It turns out that users demand more from a mobile app than they do from a mobile website. For example, 4 out of 5 app users expect an app to launch in three seconds or less. Other preferences include Related Posts Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Nonetheless, a slight majority (56%) said they have experienced issues recently with apps. App crashes and app launch problems were by far the biggest problems. What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … In January, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg stated quite plainly:We’re not going to build a phone.Later this week, he is expected to announce a Facebook Phone.But the rumored announcement of a Facebook Phone isn’t just a repudiation of that plan, it’s also another step on Zuckerberg’s slow journey torward accepting the superiority of so-called “native apps” over the Mobile Web running on HTML5. For years, Zuckerberg has championed the Mobile Web’s ability to deliver a consistent user experience across multiple devices with a single development effort. But last summer Zuckerberg admitted defeat and publicly changed course on HTML5. As ReadWrite noted at the time:Facebook released a completely rebuilt version of its iOS app for iPhone and iPad today, changing a fundamental aspect of the company’s mobile strategy. Gone is the Web-centric, HTML5 approach. In its place, Facebook has rebuilt the iOS app using Apple’s native framework. The result? A more streamlined, faster app for the iPhone and iPad.And, in fact, the iOS native Facebook app has proven faster, smoother and quicker to load versus its Mobile Web counterpart.Native Apps Heavily PreferredFacebook seems to have learned its lesson, but what about the rest of the mobile industry? A new survey by Compuware APM confirms that users greatly prefer native apps to the mobile web. (Compuware APM summarizes the survey in this press release. The full survey is available here, though it requires fairly extensive registration.) For example, the survey’s key takeaway:85% of mobile device users prefer apps over mobile websites. The primary reasons users prefer native apps over mobile websites are:Apps are considered more convenientApps are fasterApps are “easier to browse” The App RevolutionThe scope of the “app revolution” is astounding. As Compuware notes, more than 30 billion iOS apps and 15 billion Android apps have been downloaded so far – and the total is now growing by more than 1 billion every month. Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagementlast_img read more

Why the Full Frame vs. Crop Sensor Argument Isn’t Important

first_imgSensor size may be less important that you imagined.Traditionally I would advise people to get a full-frame camera if they could, but it seems like the necessity to shoot with a full frame sensor has been diminishing over the past few years. Full frame cameras get better bokeh (background blur) and they don’t have a crop factor, but in many ways they are as capable as their cropped sensor counterparts.Lens manufacturers are creating more lenses designed for cropped sensors, lessening the ‘inconvenience’ of shooting with a cropped sensor camera. So, the biggest consideration is the size of the crop factor. Whereas, a regular APS-C camera has a crop factor of around 1.7x, the difference between this and a full frame camera is lessened. However, if you’re shooting with a Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera, which has a crop factor of 2.88x, you will see a significantly larger difference between this and a full frame camera.The following video created by Zack Arias shows us the real difference between a full vs. cropped sensor. In the video, Zack shares his opinion on why you shouldn’t care so much about cropped sensors.This video was first shared by Zach Arias on his YouTube channel. Thanks for sharing Zach!One thing to note is that while there may not be huge differences between a full vs. cropped sensor in functionality, there is often a positive correlation between sensor size and camera specs. So if we are looking at a Canon camera for example a 7D with a cropped sensor isn’t going to have specs that are as good as a 6D with a full frame sensor. Keep this in mind next time you go looking for a new camera.If you want to learn more about sensors, stabilization, and crop factor check out our Understanding Lenses series on the PremiumBeat blog where we take an in-depth look at all the features to consider when purchasing a lens.Do you think Zack’s argument is valid? Do we place too much importance on sensor size rather than camera specs? Share in the comments below.last_img read more

BJP may rope in Aseemanand to work in West Bengal

first_imgThe BJP in West Bengal is planning to rope in Hindutva preacher Swami Aseemanand, who was acquitted in the Mecca Masjid blast case earlier this week, to strengthen its base, its State unit chief said here on Thursday.“I have personally known Swami Aseemanand for a long time. I will talk to him and try to bring him to West Bengal so that he can work here. For a long time, he has worked among the tribals in Bengal. He can help us in a lot of ways,” BJP State president Dilip Ghosh said.A special anti-terror court on Monday acquitted the 66-year-old self-confessed monk and four others in the 2007 Mecca Masjid blast case, holding that the prosecution failed to prove “even a single allegation” against them.Aseemanand’s younger brother, Sushanta Sarkar, is presently secretary of the BJP’s Hooghly unit.Mr. Sarkar said he would be happy if his brother returned to the State to work. “Our entire family is dedicated towards the Sangh Parivar. If my brother comes to Bengal and wants to work here, we will be very happy,” Mr. Sarkar said.A science graduateAseemanand, who was born Naba Kumar Sarkar at Kamarpukur in West Bengal’s Hooghly district, completed his graduation in science in 1971.He became involved with right-wing groups from school, going on to work full time with the Vanvasi Kalyan Ashram in Purulia and Bankura districts of the State. It was at the ashram that Naba Kumar Sarkar was christened Swami Aseemanand in 1981.last_img read more