Fortuna downs Del Norte, wins H-DNL ‘chip

first_imgAfter a coaching change, the Fortuna Huskies boys soccer team’s standout sophomore midfielder Fernando Atilano scored two goals within a minute in the Humboldt-Del Norte League tournament championship to beat the Del Norte Warriors 3-1, Saturday afternoon in Fortuna.“I started off at center-mid and I wasn’t feeling too comfortable,” Atilano said. “Once our coach made that switch that’s when the goals started coming in. I just did a quick move and once I drove down the line I knew I was gonna …last_img read more

What Golden State’s blowout win over the Lakers tells us about the postseason

first_imgBurning the gimmickDraymond Green didn’t hold back from chastising the Lakers or … CLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos or video on a mobile deviceBehind a dominating first-quarter performance and 21 points from DeMarcus Cousins, the Warriors beat the woefully overmatched Lakers 108-90 to make their magic number to clinch the No. 1 seed in the Western Conference 2.Here are three thoughts on the game and what it means as the season’s end fast approaches:last_img

Why Magazines Are Using Digital To Boost Prices, Not Bolster Innovation

first_img5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnout 4 Keys to a Kid-Safe App 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People… Well, this is disappointing.As magazines make the transition from print to pixels, some publishers are using the move as an opportunity to jack up their prices – in some cases, to more than they were charging for print editions. And that’s for tablet versions that are too often crappy afterthoughts. To be fair, magazines are contending with legitimate financial concerns. Their advertising revenue has been declining and the historically discounted subscription rates they’ve charged for print delivery just aren’t enough to pay the freight. To cope, many publishers are asking readers to chip in more – on digital versions as well as print editions.There are some problems with driving up prices too much, though.For one, everyone knows it’s cheaper to distribute content digitally than to print it and mail it. Asking buyers to pay more for something that costs you less to deliver is the kind of tactic that makes many subscribers feel exploited. It’s a head-scratcher, if not a subscription-canceler. Sure, magazine makers may still be coping with meaty legacy cost structures. But that’s not our problem, is it?  Readers Have Way More ChoicesThere’s also much more competition. Long gone are the days when magazines competed only with each other. Today, the entire Internet churns out content at a volume too great for any one human to keep up with – and it’s all instantly available at any time. In addition to traditional magazines gone tablet, there are the digital-only magazines, sitting right there on the skeuomorphic newsstand shelf. For every frustrated TIME subscriber, there’s a free download of the Huffington magazine, not to mention personalized, social-fueled digital “magazines” from Flipboard, AOL Editions, Google Currents, Zite and an ever-growing list of others. If Wiredjacks up its prices, there’s always digital mags from The Next Web and Engadet, not to mention the huge selection of tech coverage available through news aggregator apps and feed readers. How Publishers Have Fared With TabletsNot everyone in the publishing industry is enamored with the idea of publishing native tablet apps for readers to flip through. MIT Technology Review editor Jason Pontin vowed to kill his magazine’s native apps, citing high costs, technical challenges and the walled-off, un-Web-like nature of apps. The Financial Times famously pulled its iOS apps in favor of the HTML5 approach and isreportedly seeing more traffic and revenue since making the switch. Indeed, research has suggested that most readers prefer Web apps to native, platform-specific publications. 9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex… Related Posts Tags:#digital publishing#iPad#ipad magazines#magazines#tablets john paul titlow Still, some magazines have done pretty well with their digital editions, especially when they bundle them with print. In the United States, tablet publications are the second highest-grossing category of apps on iOS, according to an independent audit. Time and Conde Nast are selling the most digital mags, with news and women’s interest magazines dominating those sales. Half of Wired‘s revenue now comes from digital, which is a rare but promising milestone for a legacy publisher. I still subscribe to Wired in print, and I appreciate the fact that the iPad edition comes at no extra charge. I also happily pay for Marco Arment’s experimental publication The Magazine, because it consistently publishes content I enjoy in relatively small doses, rather than flooding me with irrelevant features and full-page ads.“The Magazine was profitable from day one,” says Arment. “As subscribers increased past break-even, I’ve been able to reinvest the additional income into more articles, higher author payments, original illustrations, photos and a professional editor.”While Arment won’t disclose hard numbers, he says he’s satisfied with what he calls The Magazine’s “fantastic success.” By utilizing what publishing expert Craig Mod calls “compact publishing” and monetizing it fairly, Arment has managed to build a profitable, if small media business in an age when industry trend lines have the stubborn tendency to slide downward.There’s clearly a limit to how much people will pay for magazine-style content. And it’s not at all clear that number is rising instead of falling. Folks who want to remain in the publishing business need to figure out a hybrid model that works, and not just jack up their prices to make up for shrinking subscriber rolls. Digital Magazines SuckThe business model isn’t the only issue here. Just as important is the consensus that most digital magazines just aren’t very good. In far too many cases, subscribing to a magazine on your tablet means downloading a bloated, glorified PDF that hardly delivers the potentially magical experience the form factor allows. Even some of the digital-only magazines from online publishers mimic print page-for-page in disappointing pinch-to-zoom layouts.  There are some promising alternatives. Wired‘s iPad app is pretty print-centric but at least the editors go to  the trouble of adding multimedia bells and whistles.  The Magazine takes an attractive minimalistic approach – both in terms of publication design and pricing.Traditional publishers may want to look to The Magazine for inspiration, as well as to social news aggregators like Flipboard and Zite, which have managed to produce truly addictive reading environments worthy of a slot in one’s home screen dock. Rethinking magazines for tablets will require publishers to get completely out of the print mindset. That means different layouts, lighter file sizes, deeper social integrations and yes, occasionally pointing readers toward content published by others. On the whole, digital magazines have a long way to go. When they get there, those of us who are most hungry for the news, analysis and entertainment they provide will happily pay up. Hopefully, there will be enough of us to make the best digital magazines into viable businesses.last_img read more

The Three Elements That Make Most Micro-Budget Films Fail

first_imgAs low cost cinema cameras dominate the independent film scene, high level filmmaking has never been more accessible than it is today. That said, it takes a lot more than the right camera and gear to actually make a film that is worth watching.Many up and coming filmmakers are scared to make a film with no budget. They often don’t have the experience to know how difficult it is to raise the funding to make a film, and won’t even consider making one on a limited budget.While there is nothing wrong with aiming to raise a substantial budget to make your first feature, the truth of the matter is that it is extremely difficult to do so (even for seasoned filmmakers). You don’t necessarily need that money to make an excellent film today. Not to mention, in order to raise that kind of money you need to have a calling card (usually in the form of a low/no budget project) so producers will trust you with their money.Image from WikimediaThe good news is that making a film with little or no money can still yield great results that are comparable to any well-funded film, so long as you are creative and adopt a solid strategy for yourself. As we all know from watching studio produced films over the last several years, more money doesn’t necessarily translate to better movies. If you’re eager to make a film, but money is tight, here are three considerations that you should never overlook.1. Story is EVERYTHINGTechnological breakthroughs in all the various facets of filmmaking have completely changed the world of cinema and digital production. While in many respects, these great advances have opened up a new and exciting world for filmmakers from all walks of life, I would argue that the quality of independent films have greatly suffered over the past several years. It used to be that a great story/screenplay got your film made, but with easy access to digital cinema cameras and post-tools, simply owning the right gear (or knowing someone with the right gear) is enough to get your film made, even if it doesn’t have a fully developed story.Understanding cinematography, editing or particular uses for gear, is critical to your success as a filmmaker. However, your camera and all the various ‘toys’ you utilize throughout production are simply there to enhance your story. You may think that you need to hyper focus on developing your skillset behind the camera or in post in order for your film to have a cinematic quality, but you need to put just as much emphasis on the story and concept. After all, a great idea with poor production value will go a lot further than a poor idea with great production value.Look at a film like ‘Clerks‘ by Kevin Smith. Yes, that example is going back a couple of decades, but even for itts time the quality level of that film was extremely poor. It was black and white, grainy, poorly lit, badly composed…but guess what? It was a success because the writing and the story were on point.2. Immaculate Location AudioNothing is more detrimental to your film than poorly recorded, amateur audio. If you’ve already made a film or two, you should clearly understand how critical great location audio is, and also understand that poor audio can completely ruin your project. Not having a big budget is absolutely no excuse for not capturing great audio, as it really just comes down to prioritizing it, rather than taking a ‘we’ll fix it in post’ attitude. For whatever reason, even though most filmmakers know how important great audio is, the audio department is one of the first things that’s compromised on low budget films.A great tool that I use for smaller productions, which I strongly recommend, is the Zoom H6 Handy Portable Digital Recorder. It is a relatively low priced field recorder, with most of the features you’d find on similar, yet more expensive recording equipment. It takes 4 XLR inputs (up to 6 with an added module), and has many of the same features built-in that you would find on a more professional level audio recorder. In an ideal world, you don’t want to be rolling your own audio (a dedicated sound recordist is always a far better choice), but in a pinch you can get great results with a device like the Zoom H6 and a couple of high quality mics.No matter if you choose to hire a sound recordist or do your own location sound, make sure that you put just as much effort into the sound as the image. After all, it’s been proven time and time again that audio influences an audience’s experience far more than imagery.3. Understand Your Limitations Early OnIf you’re shooting a film with little or no money, you need to identify your creative limitations early on, and keep your head out of the clouds when it comes time to develop your idea and screenplay. So often filmmakers with small budgets will want to write a script with car chases, explosions, exotic locations and other extraneous elements, and don’t realize until it’s too late that this just isn’t feasible.Personally, I welcome limitations when I make films with very little money. In fact, there are times when I find it easier to work with fewer resources. This gives me the opportunity to strategically utilize what I have around me and quickly dismiss what is not in the realm of possibility for my film. For example, if I have a certain location in mind for a scene but the permit to shoot there is too expensive, I may change the scene around to take place in a different part of that same location, where I could get away with guerrilla shooting. At first, this may seem like a compromise, but more often than not the scene will actually become stronger and more unique by changing it around, since the shooting limitations can force originality and uniqueness in the scene.In SummaryThere are many great tips and suggestions that I could make to no-budget filmmakers with regards to lighting, casting, camera choices, and so on. However, most of these elements are secondary and the success of your micro budget film will rely very heavily on having a vision and maintaining your focus. Your ability to focus on a well told, proactive story is critical – and thankfully this part of the process doesn’t cost you a dollar.There’s nothing wrong with wanting to shoot on a great camera, or having a preference for the visual elements of your film, but at the end of the day whoever is viewing your film is going to be captivated by the story, the sound, and the execution far more than the technical merits of your visual production, so always keep that in mind!last_img read more

Tendulkar to bat for J&K school

first_imgCricket icon Sachin Tendulkar has sanctioned over ₹40 lakh from the MP Local Area Development (MPLAD) funds for the construction of a school building in Bandipora district of North Kashmir.The letter he wrote to DM & District Collector Deependra Singh Kushwah, is in possession of PTI.Mr. Tendulkar, in his letter, mentioned that the Imperial Educational Institute Drugmulla, had requested funds and “the request must be scrutinised.” The description of work requested include construction of a school building with 10 class rooms, four laboratories, an adminstrative block, six toilets and an assembly/prayer hall.last_img read more