Imperial Beach residents concerned after another sewage spill could close beaches on

first_imgImperial Beach residents concerned after another sewage spill could close beaches on Independence Day Dan Plante 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsIMPERIAL BEACH (KUSI) – Many Imperial Beach residents are concerned they can’t enjoy celebrating Independence Day after about a million gallons of sewage spills from the Tijuana River Valley.Beach closures are expected, and that could spoil the fun for celebrating America’s birthday in Imperial Beach.KUSI’s Dan Plante has the details. July 3, 2019 Updated: 5:56 PM Classic California Beach Town DUMPED ON Before 4th Of July. Another 800-Thousand Gallons Of Raw Sewage Headed Toward Imperial Beach. City Leaders Want To Declare “Public Health Crisis”. But Beach Will Be Open. KUSI Tonight. pic.twitter.com/gXYyHuTeoT— Dan Plante (@DanPlanteKUSI) July 3, 2019 Posted: July 3, 2019 Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Dan Plante, last_img read more

STATE REP RACE QA Erin Buckley Discusses Education Issues Negative Campaigning

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Wilmington Apple is asking weekly questions to the seven candidates running in contested primaries for the Wilmington/Tewksbury State Representative seat (19th Middlesex).Below, in her own words, are the responses to this week’s questions from candidate Erin Buckley (R-Tewksbury).#13) The Massachusetts education funding formula hasn’t been updated in 25 years. This Chapter 70 formula fails to provide the funding needed for school districts to fund core expenses. The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center published a report last week (“Building An Education System That Works For Everyone: Funding Reforms To Help All Our Children Thrive“) detailing the problem. The Wilmington & Tewksbury School Committees have long advocated for the State House to update the Chapter 70 formula. Do you commit to fighting for an updated formula? What else will you do as State Representative to help our public schools?Yes, I support the fight to re-evaluate the Education Funding Formula. This has not been done since the Education Reform Act of 1993, under Governor Celluci. I would also favor additional language that would make the formula automatically reviewed after a certain number of years. The economic conditions of our Commonwealth change, school systems change, and therefor the language to keep Chapter 70 an advanced and productive means to fund our educational system must change as well. I believe that the fiscal 2019 Budget does address some funding shortfalls with $100m more dollars to chapter 70, as well as regional school bussing, charter school reimbursement, and Special Education Circuit Breaker funding; however these changes are only for next year and we need to take a good look at how the formula should work for the long-term betterment of our schools’ futures.#14) Define “negative campaigning.” Do you pledge not to engage in any negative campaigning during this election? Why or why not? When responding to an attack, will you follow the “when they go low, we go high” Michelle Obama mantra or the “when someone attacks me, I always attack back… except 100x more” Donald Trump mantra?I take umbrage with this question — and beyond the not-so-subtle implication that Democrats engage in a superior form of politics than Republicans. Politics is the arena for a battle of ideas. Voters should take into account a variety of factors about a candidate: intelligence, experience, community involvement, history of accomplishment and service, etc. If a fellow candidate lacks these crucial characteristics, that is well within the arena and must be discussed. If a candidate holds beliefs that another candidate finds potentially damaging to the contested district or state or body, that must be shared and if it warrants strong speech, so be it. “Negative campaigning” is in the eye and ear of the beholder and it is too often defined along party lines. For me, truly negative campaigning is any action or speech that promotes no agenda and only works to reduce the process itself. And that is something I refuse to both engage in — nor suffer quietly. As the saying goes, let the best candidate win!(NOTE: Do you have a question for the candidates? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com and it may be asked in a future Q&A or in a debate.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedSTATE REP RACE Q&A: Pina Prinzivalli Discusses Education Issues, Negative CampaigningIn “Government”STATE REP RACE Q&A: Erika Johnson Discusses Education Issues, Negative CampaigningIn “Government”STATE REP RACE Q&A: Mark Kratman Discusses Education Issues, Negative CampaigningIn “Government”last_img read more

To iPad or Not to iPad

first_img This story appears in the August 2010 issue of Entrepreneur. Subscribe » Hear from business owners and CEOs who went through a crippling business problem and came out the other side bigger and stronger. Listen Now 4 min read Problem Solvers with Jason Feifer Never mind that 1 million iPads were sold in just 28 days–less than half the time it took to sell the same number of iPhones. Or that RBC Capital Markets estimates that iPads outsell Apple Macs by a 2-1 ratio. But deciding to put your small business on the iPad magical mystery tour is not the no-brainer that pundits want it to be. Clear iPad pluses such as its cool factor, access to thousands of apps and fabulous battery life are marred by its lack of keyboard, small screen size and limited software targeted to small business. Not surprisingly, passionate camps have formed on both sides of the iPad question. Let the tablet smackdown begin.Can’t Live With ItChuck McHugh, president of Industrial Design Innovations, a Dearborn, Mich., automotive shipping and logistics businessThe iPad is the furthest thing from Chuck McHugh’s mind–which is remarkable, considering he has just spent $34,000 installing 10 design-focused computer imaging systems.”Not just the iPad, McHugh says. “Apple was not even part of the conversation.Industrial Design Innovations is a 26-person firm that creates shipping containers for specialty car parts for clients such as Ford, Toyota and Harley Davidson. The company’s aging design tool, called CATIA, was recently upgraded from a legacy UNIX Sun SPARC server. Ford, one of the firm’s biggest clients, dictated that Windows would be the platform.McHugh saw no need to use computers that could handle both Apple and Windows software. Instead, he saved about 70 percent on the cost of Macs by using traditional Dell notebooks and desktops. “We saw significant improvement in speed and overall performance with this system, he says.McHugh recently launched a second company within his firm called RF-IDI, which specializes in remotely tracking car parts. The system lets workers locate misplaced machine parts on factory floors using radio frequency identification tags matched to handheld computers. McHugh said the company considered many hardware and software options and landed on Panasonic Toughbooks, developing its own app out of standard languages like C++.”There would be nothing unique for the iPad to do here, McHugh says. Can’t Live Without ItBJ Farmer, CEO of CITOC, an IT consulting and business services firm in HoustonBJ Farmer is not ashamed of his lust for all things iPad.”I have staked my whole company on it, he says. “I told my development guys that I do not want to have a single application that does not work on an iPad.Farmer’s 18-person firm, which he started in 1995 after a career in accounting, specializes in web-based business process automation. He firmly believes that the iPad is the next bridge for even the smallest and most techno-phobic firms to step out onto the Internet business cloud.Farmer points out that an iPad is stable, rugged and can run all day without a recharge. Entrepreneurs may not be able to create a PowerPoint or Excel file on it, he says, but the unit is the best solution for updating company files. Factor in its wow appeal that closes deals and access to work force automation apps, and the iPad becomes Farmer’s small-business web access tool of choice.He admits the iPad is far from perfect: There is no camera, which limits the use of optical character recognition, and there is no projector output, which cuts into the tablet’s effectiveness as a demonstration tool. But those limitations don’t dampen Farmer’s enthusiasm. His firm is considering giving away iPads to customers to drive sales of its cloud-based products.”I figure once I hand these to a client and they can see what they can do, it will open doors to a whole new level of tools,” he says. July 19, 2010last_img read more