Striker Defoe ‘fears he could be forced to quit Tottenham’

first_imgJermain Defoe fears he could be forced to quit Tottenham if he is facing another season on the bench, the Daily Mirror report.QPR have been linked with the England striker, with Sunderland and Reading also said to be interested.“Everyone knows how much I love Tottenham. Everybody knows that they are the club I want to play for,” he said.“But last season was heartbreaking for me in terms of putting my body on the line, being prepared to give everything for the club and not getting a game.”The Sun claim Arsenal are ahead of QPR and Fulham in a race to sign South Korean star Ki Sung-Yueng from Celtic.Once again it is suggested – this time by the Daily Mail – that QPR want to loan Joey Barton to a League club in order to run down his 12-match ban but the Football League will not sanction a deal. Clint Dempsey thinks Liverpool will now finally table a firm bid for him, according to the Mirror.Anfield boss Brendan Rodgers is interested in signing Dempsey from Fulham, where the American has reportedly fallen out with manager Martin Jol.And it is claimed that Liverpool shelling out £15m to capture midfielder Joe Allen from Swansea has left Dempsey believing Rodgers will now look to complete a deal to sign him too.Liverpool’s Merseyside rivals Everton are considering making a move for Dempsey, the Mail report.Meanwhile, the Mirror say Chelsea have entered fresh talks with Marseille in an attempt to push through the £6m signing of Spain full-back Cesar Azpilicueta before the new season starts.They will apparently turn to alternatives, including Juventus’ Switzerland right-back Stephan Lichtsteiner, if their pursuit of Azpilicueta does not work out.This page is regularly updated. Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Half-time: Nottingham Forest 2 Fulham 1

first_imgRoss McCormack’s stunning free-kick gave Fulham hope of salvaging something after a disastrous start saw them concede twice inside 21 minutes. Both goals were disputed by the Whites, who claimed Britt Assombalonga handled the first and felt his second from the penalty spot came following a fair challenge by Shaun Hutchinson on Michail Antonio.Controversy aside, Nottingham Forest’s lead was harsh on bottom-of-the-table Fulham who had started well despite the ever-increasing pressure on manager Felix Magath.Home keeper Karl Darlow saved Tim Hoogland’s 20-yard shot and then just about stopped another long-range strike from McCormack.But Forest led when Assombalonga headed home Henri Lansbury’s free-kick and it was 2-0 when Assombalonga found the bottom corner from the penalty spot after Hutchinson appeared to have won a perfectly timed tackle on Antonio as he raced through on goal.But Fulham showed good spirit to pull a goal back when McCormack curled the ball over the wall and into the near post and they almost snatched an equaliser when Hugo Rodallega’s shot was cleared off the line by Eric Lichaj. Fulham: Kiraly; Bodurov, Hutchinson, Burn, Amorebieta; Hoogland, Parker, Fotheringham, Stafylidis; McCormack, Rodallega. Subs: Bettinelli, Eisfeld, Roberts, G. Williams, Hyndman, David, Kavanagh.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

SA gets access to UN climate fund

first_imgLocated at Durban’s Botanic Gardens, it represents the type of innovative, out-of-the-box thinking that is needed to address the impacts of climate change and the need to find solutions to a low-carbon economy that can also create sustainable jobs. Also launched on Wednesday was the Living Beehive, which contains architectural techniques of the original Zulu beehive hut construction, but combines modern materials such as steel frames with natural building materials, such as indigenous plants typical of the rolling hills of the grasslands in KwaZulu-Natal. National Planning Minister Trevor Manual made the announcement in Durban on Tuesday on the sidelines of the launch of Living Beehive, a legacy project of the UN Climate Change Conference (COP 17). 2 December 2011 Manuel said the fund would finance projects that aim to improve society’s ability to cope with the risks posed by climate change. “By recognising the importance of built and ecological infrastructure, and by bringing together natural and man-made design, the Living Beehive shows us the possibilities for job creation, service delivery and economic growth in a truly green economy,” Mabudafhasi said. The project was funded by the Department of Environmental Affairs and the UN’s Industrial Development Organisation. South Africa is now the fourth country that has an accredited national implementing entity, which translates into direct access to the UNFCCC adaptation fund. “As a country that is particularly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, this appointment is significant for South Africa for securing the funds needed to plan our development trajectory in a way that is responsive to climate change.” Seventeen metres in diameter and nine metres high, the art installation has been designed to showcase South Africa’s rich blend of natural, cultural and mineral wealth at COP 17. The Beehive’s living walls represent the importance of healthy ecosystems and are populated with indigenous grasses, forbs and bulbs. The South African National Biodiversity Institute has been accredited as a national implementing entity for the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Adaptation Fund. Deputy Water and Environmental Affairs Minister Rejoice Mabudafhasi said the Living Beehive was an example of nature and people working together. Source: BuaNews Zulu beehive hut construction The fund, which became fully operational in January, has conferred US$50-million worth of grants this year alone. The South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI) works closely with national climate change policymakers, and it has led the development of South Africa’s second national communication on climate change for COP 17. “This access, combined with our rich biodiversity and extensive mineral wealth, will allow South Africa to balance investment in optimal development futures with the appropriate allocation of resources to environmental programmes,” Manuel said.last_img read more

Overview: the Gauteng Stakeholder Workshop

first_imgThe Gauteng Stakeholder Workshop featured vibrant discussion about the existence of a country’s brand, the pros and cons of having one, and the best way to build a nation brand. It was widely agreed that all provinces should align with the overall nation brand message. From left to right, Sipho Mhlongo, from the Gauteng Growth and Development Agency, Brand South Africa chief executive Kingsley Makhubela, and Joburg Mayor Parks Tau address stakeholders at the Gauteng Stakeholder Workshop on 19 August 2015. (Image: CD Anderson)• Brand South Africa salutes Cowen High School for winning the Umhlobo Wenene FM debate competition • Brand South Africa invites stakeholders to contribute to insights on the South African Nation Brand • Young South Africans plan to stay at home • People and complexity: the missing ingredients in celebrity activism for Africa • Brilliant young minds at the CSIR Priya PitamberSouth Africans should concentrate on the positive: “We should be defined by what we are doing.” This was the message from newly appointed chief executive Kingsley Makhubela at Brand South Africa’s Gauteng Stakeholder Workshop, held in Sandton on 19 August.Sipho Mhlongo, group executive for trade, investment and regulatory enablement at the Gauteng Growth and Development Agency welcomed everyone to the discussion, held at the Gauteng Investment Centre. He said there are many great things happening in South Africa.One strong message about positivityMakhubela spoke about the importance of the provinces and the country aligning the overall brand message. “It’s important that provinces align [brand] messages and in the process of aligning it, not shoot ourselves in the foot.”He brought up instances in which South Africa had performed well – surviving the 2008 economic downturn and not having to bail out any banks; the rapid growth of the corporate sector since the mid-90s; and the good performance of the country’s academic institutions. He pointed out that six South African universities featured in the Top 10 list of the Times Higher Education (THE) Africa University Ranking.Makhubela recounted an anecdote: he got an opportunity to study overseas but one of his lecturers at a South African university advised him it was important to study in Africa, because that way the knowledge was able to remain on the continent.But South Africa also faced huge problems, he admitted, bringing up the issue of the local drug cocktail, nyaope. “We are going to lose a generation [to drugs],” he warned. “These sorts of social issues need to be addressed.” And one way to do this was to grow the economy.Big city lifeJoburg Mayor Parks Tau noted the importance of cities in identifying problems and finding solutions. The South African Cities Network, which represents most of the country’s main cities, acknowledges the large role big cities played in a country.It publishes a State of the City report about the work done. “Cities have become important pointers of development,” Tau stressed. “Cities have a role to play in finding solutions and resolving complex issues.”Joburg, the largest city not close to a river or sea, was a city of migrants and their ability to make it grow resulted in its success. “Forty percent of the people in Joburg now, are born outside of Joburg.”While it had made strides in investing in infrastructure, problems still existed, such as traffic congestion. The solution did not exist in building more roads, the mayor said. “We have to create alternatives because we cannot build our way out of problems… It’s about changing our mind-set.”He encouraged the audience to take advantage of the upcoming #EcoMobility campaign in October, aimed at getting people out of cars and using other modes of transport.South African Competitiveness Forum Dr Petrus de Kock, Brand South Africa’s general manager for research, spoke about the need to find a way to position the brand of the country. (Image: Priya Pitamber)The first session of the day, by Dr Petrus de Kock, the general manager for research at Brand South Africa, was about the South African Competitiveness Forum (SACF). The inaugural SACF took place back in 2013, born of a need to identify the work of positioning the brand of the country.In his presentation, De Kock described the SACF as a call “on all South Africans to play their part and engage in collaborative efforts to build a strong national reputation based on a globally competitive economy”.“As Brand South Africa, we have to understand the range and strengths of the nation to market it to the world and locally. Getting input from provinces can help with the messaging sent out,” he added.There was also opportunity to learn from where the country had succeeded and apply those lessons to challenges.A few discussion points emerged from the session, too, including the recent xenophobic incidents in the country and the response to them. De Kock said there was a lot of messaging in that period from the government and officials. Brand South Africa also studied the social response. “It doesn’t matter how small a group is, damage can be caused to the reputation,” De Kock observed.Other topics of discussion were whether it was possible to tackle negative perceptions of the country; whether it was a risk to build a nation brand; how the media could help in building a positive image of the country; the funding of small and medium enterprises; and how South Africa’s sense of pride was defined.“National pride is linked to inner emotions; it’s more than tourism and sport,” a speaker said.Nation Brand Master Class Brand South Africa acting chief marketing officer Sithembile Ntombela gave a Master Class on the Nation Brand. (Image: Priya Pitamber)Sithembile Ntombela, Brand South Africa’s acting chief marketing officer, conducted the Nation Brand Master Class. She said it was important build the nation, to find a nice narrative of South Africa. “We are selling our country,” she said.“The master class is about building a nation brand that at its core is unified through its diversity,” she noted in her presentation. “Building anything requires taking many pieces that work and fit together to make the bigger picture complete.”Provinces should align their messages with that of the country, Ntombela added, which would require a lot of planning. “We must relay true and relevant messages,” she said. “And promote a common sense of identity and pride.”A puzzle approach would work best because it could be used to “educate and guide key stakeholders in the intricacies of handling a nation brand, we created work that literally shows that everyone has a part to play in making our country a complete and competing nation”.Brazil, she said by way of example, was automatically associated with flair, the samba, and carnival; history was attached to Egypt, India and Peru; so too could South Africa create its unique stamp to sell to the rest of the world.Feedback on researchDe Kock shared the outcomes from the extensive research conducted by Brand South Africa, and it showed good news.“You can’t sell the brand of a country, without inside buy-in,” he reasoned. So the research started in the domestic arena, to find out what issues were on the minds of South Africans. It made use of a diverse national sample of 2 524 people.The Domestic Perceptions Research showed that while there were concerns among South Africans relating to crime, corruption and a lack of job opportunities, it also found that “citizens want to focus on solutions. And South Africans are willing to take action, rather than wait for someone else to do so.”Findings also showed that the majority of the population was under 35 and lived in urban areas; there was an increase in the middle class after 1994; 92% of the sample interviewed had a “good” or “strong” sense of pride; and many South Africans were aspirant that their children would live a better life than what they did.Country Messaging Framework Manusha Pillai, the Brand South Africa general manager of communications, talked about the Country Messaging Framework. (Image: Priya Pitamber)Brand South Africa’s Manusha Pillai, the general manager of communications, spoke about the National Development Plan (NDP) and how it could be tied into the country’s messaging framework.Pillars of the Country Messaging Framework mirrored the NDP and included tourism, culture and heritage, policy, people, brands, and investment and recruitment, all to be used to market South Africa.“Brand South Africa has been working with a various stakeholders from government, business and civil society to compile this Country Messaging Framework,” she said in her presentation, in which she described South Africans as having an energy and great problem-solving skills.last_img read more

Matt Damon Says If You Want To Help Become A Student

first_imgFor people interested in getting involved in philanthropy, actor Matt Damon suggests becoming the student first.If the experts are asking questions and constantly learning, why shouldn’t the uninitiated? “Once you give yourself permission to not know [everything], that’s when life gets exciting again.”That’s what Damon said in a recent interview with Philanthropy Age as he described his own learning curve in his efforts to bring clean water and sanitation to areas of Africa and Asia where it was lacking.Damon already knew that millions of people die each year from water-related illness, and that a child dies every minute due to inaccessibility to clean water. That’s why he created H20 Africa – to provide funding to NGOs and small projects that were doing good work in bringing clean water to remote areas.“People talk about the global water crisis and what’s coming down the road,” Damon said in the interview. “[… but] for 748 million people, the crisis is already here.”But Damon wanted to do more, to have a greater impact than what H20 Africa was achieving. In 2009, he merged H20 Africa with Gary White’s WaterPartners to create Water.org. An expert in the field, Gary White had established a successful record in a world where half of all water projects fail. And so began Damon’s real education in how to help well.With a mission to solve the water crisis in our lifetime, Water.org has a stronger focus on larger, more innovative solutions with the potential for success in the long term. “One idea we pioneered is Water Credit,” says Damon. “Water Credit is a small loan for a family or community to get a water connection or a toilet. We convinced banks to make loans that weren’t being made by sharing the financial risk with them. This brought new funds to people in need. The idea works. Water Credit is taking off around the world because it benefits more people, faster. That makes it a solution critical to ending the crisis. ““More kids are dying from this than from AIDS, measles and malaria combined,” says Damon. “It’s the most serious problem out there.”Copyright ©2014Look to the Starslast_img read more