9 months agoBarcelona exploring prospect of signing Chelsea striker Morata

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Barcelona exploring prospect of signing Chelsea striker Morataby Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBarcelona are exploring the prospect of signing Chelsea striker Alvaro Morata.Sport says Barcelona are pondering a loan swoop for Morata.The out-of-favour Blues forward has just five goals in 16 Premier League games this term.Barca are undecided over whether to sign a striker in the winter window but Morata is among the names they are considering should they decide to bolster their frontline.The Catalan giants have apparently already enquired about Morata’s situation but are yet to make a formal offer to the Blues.Barcelona have allowed Munir El Haddadi to leave for Sevilla, which could open the door for them to swoop for Morata. last_img read more

Video: South Carolina Fan Darius Rucker Pays Up On Lost Bet, Sings Notre Dame Fight Song To Mike Golic

first_imgDarius Rucker sings the Notre Dame fight song.Darius Rucker Notre DameESPN radio personality Mike Golic, a Notre Dame grad, and country star Darius Rucker, a South Carolina fan, made a bet prior to the women’s Final Four game between their two schools. Notre Dame won, so Rucker lost the bet. He paid up last night. Here he is singing the Fighting Irish fight song to Golic on stage at a concert. Here’s for all you Notre Dame fans… @dariusrucker #FightSong pic.twitter.com/rD7KqUE3CX— kenzz (@mblessingg) June 28, 2015Enjoy it, Notre Dame fans.last_img read more

New Zealand business tourism rising

first_imgSource = e-Travel Blackboard: S.P The most recent statistics show an increase in New Zealand’s popularity as a destination for conference and incentive groups from the Australian market.The figures show a 38 percent increase for 2011 in Australian travellers compared to that of the previous year.Further to this, February 2011 has seen a 55 percent increase alone, in Australian delegates visiting for conferences and incentives when compared to February 2010.“Our business tourism industry is performing very strongly at the moment and that’s reflected in these figures,” said Conventions and Incentives New Zealand chief executive Alan Trotter.New Zealand’s close proximity to Australia and the current strength of the Australian dollar means Australians can get “much more bang for their buck,” Mr Trotter said.The annual business tourism expo meeting will be held in Rotorua next month, to promote the industry’s services and facilities to overseas conference organisers.last_img read more

Rep Rendon discusses protection against elder abuse in longterm care

first_img02May Rep. Rendon discusses protection against elder abuse in long-term care State Rep. Daire Rendon of Lake City last Thursday welcomed representatives from the Michigan Elder Justice Initiative to the Families, Children and Seniors Committee to discuss how the group protects senior citizens against elder abuse.Alison E. Hirschel, director and managing attorney from the Michigan Elder Justice Initiative; Sali Pung, state long-term care ombudsman; and Dan Wojciak, MI Health Link ombudsman, explained that many Michigan families have experienced some type of long-term care issues, personally or within their family. One in 10 Americans age 60 years or older has experienced some form of elder abuse and one in 14 cases of abuse are reported to authorities.“Elder abuse is an enormous problem,” Rendon said. “Abuse can destroy lives and people’s sense of security. There are trusted and confidential resources to protect American citizens and prevent them from becoming victims. Better quality care for Americans results in better quality lives.”The Michigan Elder Justice Initiative is one of several statewide services created by the Michigan Advocacy Program.### Categories: Daire Rendon Newslast_img read more

Content security specialist Civolution has joined

first_imgContent security specialist Civolution has joined CDN provider Akamai’s NetAlliance partner programme for digital media solution partners.  Civolution’s NexGuard pay TV technology will be integrated with the Akamai cloud platform to support over-the-top video content delivery for premium consumer video-on-demand and business-to-business activities.‘’This is about creating value, for the movie and pay TV industries by providing early-window content at a premium rate, and for consumers, who will now be able to access and watch a recently released movie in their home theatre,’’ said Alex Terpstra, CEO, Civolution. “We are very pleased to join Akamai’s NetAlliance partner programme. Our forensic watermarking integration with the Akamai HD Network is an important step toward enabling new offering of premium VOD for OTT delivery.’’last_img read more

Channel distributor Thema is providing a range of

first_imgChannel distributor Thema is providing a range of distribution and playout services for Cape Verde broadcaster Television of Cape Verde (TCV).Under the terms of its deal, Thema is the exclusive distributor of TCV. The company is also providing playout and uplink of TCV to the Eutelsat W2A satellite at 10° East, enabling the broadcaster to reach Cape Verde expatriate audiences in Africa and Europe.Thema said it had initiated commercial negotiations with distribution partners, with upcoming launches of the channel scheduled in Portugal, the main centre for Cape Verde immigrants in Europe.last_img read more

OTT TV provider Magine has launched its service on

first_imgOTT TV provider Magine has launched its service on Google’s Chromecast HDMI streaming stick in Sweden and Germany.Magine, which offers web delivered TV to phones, tablets, PCs and smart TVs – said that the Chromecast partnership will let viewers easily access its service on TV screens.Chromecast users can now ‘cast’ Magine to their TVs from Magine’s Android or iOS TV app, as well as its web interface from the Chrome browser on Windows.The news comes after Magine announced in September that it was migrating to a full-fledged subscription model in Germany, offering a ‘Magic’ package that includes new content from pay TV partners Sony, Discovery, Turner and Universal.last_img read more

Duco Sickinghe Dutch telco KPN has named former Te

first_imgDuco SickingheDutch telco KPN has named former Telenet CEO Duco Sickinghe as its new chairman.Sickinghe will succeed Jos Streppel on April 15 at the company’s annual general meeting of shareholders, following the termination of the latter’s third and final term in the role.Sickinghe has been a member of KPN’s supervisory board since April last year.He resigned as CEO of Telenet two years ago after Liberty Global moved to take full control of the company but encountered resistance from a number of investors.KPN has also appointed Jolande Sap, currently chair of mental healthcare institution Arkin and a former politician and leader of the GroenLinks party, to its supervisory board, replacing Tini Hooymans.last_img read more

Justins note Beyond Meat BYND is soaring The

first_imgJustin’s note: Beyond Meat (BYND) is soaring.The plant-based meat producer is up around 500% since the company went public in May. The company is now worth over $9 billion, and is trading at more than 80 times its trailing 12-month sales.That’s an absurd valuation. But many believe the stock could keep running. That’s because the company is supposed to radically change how people eat.Personally, I think BYND’s a bubble that will pop any day now. But I was interested in the big trend here of plant-based meat. So, I got Doug Casey on the phone to see what he thinks about BYND and the future of food…Justin: Doug, there’s a lot of hype around Beyond Meat right now, and for good reason.Its stock is up around 500% since the company went public in May. Not only that, Whole Foods’ CEO recently described Beyond Meat as the future of food, saying, “You have a business here that is real and that is in the early innings.”Do you buy that? Is plant-based meat really the future?Doug: This trend – and I think it is a trend – has been predicted for some time. When I was in high school, Mr. Blue by Myles Connolly was a popular book for a while. I just looked it up – it was written in 1928. It’s been a long time since I read it, but if my memory serves, among other things it posited that people and machines would both run on the same fuel, a petroleum derivative, in a dystopian future. It’s not an unreasonable prediction. Because although there are 92 naturally occurring elements most food consists of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen. These elements basically compose all carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. Plus traces of others like iron, copper, and sulfur.Fabricating “food,” or at least something that can fuel the body’s cells, is just practical chemistry. As technology improves it will be possible to create all sorts of foods that look and taste like the real thing. Perhaps better. Science fiction has always been the best predictor of the future, and I have no doubt that “replicators,” like those on Star Trek, will create food. 3-D printing is a major step in that direction.Right now it’s still at the stage of using plants to transform raw materials into something that tastes like meat. The next question is not just whether we can cut out animals, which transform plants. But cut out the plants, which transform raw chemical compounds. It’s only logical that this trend will accelerate. The question is whether the foods are also economic and tasty. Let’s hope it goes in that direction, rather than towards Soylent Green – which is rather unaesthetic. The creation of foods out of various stages of raw material has lots of implications on political and sociological – not to mention philosophical – levels. But we’re mainly interested on how to turn a buck here…As far as making money is concerned, I don’t like to invest in science projects. There’s just too much research and development (R&D), experimentation, and uncertainty – it might even be riskier than mining exploration, which is saying something. In addition, projects like this tend to be cultural problems. And it takes generations to change cultures. So, I wouldn’t touch Beyond Meat’s stock with a cattle prod at the moment.Justin: Why do you think its stock is up so much then?Doug: Well, since I haven’t personally tried any of their products, I can’t comment on their taste or cost. When I do, perhaps I’ll change my opinion. I have no doubt that as the tech improves – which it will – both will get better. But there’s plenty of time to get involved – when other companies are out there, and there’s not a speculative bubble.I think the stock’s gone up because interest rates are near record lows and the Federal Reserve is printing money. All that money has got to go somewhere. It’s just part of the great financial bubble. And it’s generally a bad idea to chase after every fashionable idea. Especially late in a bubble.As far as artificial meat itself is concerned, the Chinese have made many great meat substitutes from mushrooms, soy, and wheat for many decades. When I used to live in Hong Kong, one of my favorite restaurants specialized in Buddhist vegetarian dishes. The menu had lots of pork and beef taste-alikes that were extremely appetizing. I certainly didn’t feel the need for real meat when I ate there. But those products never really made it in the U.S.But I don’t doubt “faux flesh” is a growing trend.Justin: What about the green movement? I imagine eco-conscious millennials have played a huge role in bidding up Beyond Meat’s stock.Doug: This is absolutely part of the green movement. A lot of it is based on people being made to feel guilty for even existing, not to mention eating animals.I understand the ethical argument. I don’t like killing other creatures. I feel somewhat sheepish going to a store and buying meat products that someone else has killed, despite the fact it’s just a question of specialization and division of labor. It’s certainly more authentic to eat what you’ve actually hunted and killed yourself. But that’s impractical in today’s world.This is mostly a matter of economics. Most food is based on corn, soybeans, wheat, and rice. All these commodity groups are grown in gigantic monocultures that cover hundreds of thousands of square miles. Any large artificial monoculture is an accident waiting to happen.The day of the self-sustaining family farm, like the one Joel Salatin runs and writes about, is done. At least for 98% of humanity. I’m not a dedicated farmer like Joel. But I can tell you that at current prices it’s somewhere between hard and impossible to make money growing food at today’s prices.My main objection to faux foods is personal, and aesthetic. I don’t like the idea of eating manufactured or industrial foods. But perhaps that’s just because I have enough money to allow me to eat whatever I want. Those big four grains are for feeding the masses. Humans didn’t eat that kind of food for the first 99% of our existence.That sounds elitist, I know. Which is a bit of a contradiction, because it’s well-known I generally despise today’s “elite.” But, on the other hand, every human who’s not a useless mouth should strive to become elite. It’s just a question of how we define that word. And what you do to become elite. Just being no more than a carbon-based life form that has to be fed doesn’t cut it.If you’re at a certain economic level – as I presume anyone reading this is – you’re not directly affected by whether the corn crop fails, or wheat goes back to $10 a bushel. That’s largely a problem for Third World countries with socialist governments, places where they can’t produce anything but more poor people. But, in that context I’ve got to point out that all the foods, not just wheat, corn, and soybeans, but also cattle, sugar, coffee and orange juice, are at just about historic lows. So, now is the time to get into these things from a speculative point of view.It’s very dangerous to grow anything in a gigantic monoculture. There are viruses, bacteria, insects, and other pests that can wipe out these crops wholesale. The Chinese are dealing with that now with their hog crop; an African swine fever breakout has wiped out 20% to 30% of the hogs in China. Closer to home, flooding in the Midwest has devastated this year’s corn, wheat, and soybean harvests. At the same time that most of the world’s crops have been engineered to be grown using the pesticide glyphosate (RoundUp), there are huge lawsuits being won that could ban its use. It’s accused – quite possibly correctly – as being a dangerous carcinogen. “Roundup Ready” crops don’t do well, however, without RoundUp.I say that with the understanding that productivity of all foods has been going up for many years. Farmers produce two to three times per acre more than they did just fifty years ago. I’m sure, for many reasons not germane to this short discussion, that trend is going to continue. Always remember that the longest bear market in history is commodities. In real terms they’ve been collapsing in price for roughly 10,000 years – punctuated by explosive rallies, usually caused by either natural disasters like flood or drought, or anthropogenic ones, like war and collectivism.My guess is that we’re at the bottom for commodity prices here. Unless we have a credit collapse, there will be fortunes made in the next couple of years. People who feel guilty about profiting from higher food prices simply have no understanding of basic economics. A proper speculator is a humanitarian in disguise. Why? By buying things when there’s a surplus, and prices are cheap, he’s in a position to make them available to the less prudent when there’s a shortage.Now’s an excellent time to speculate on these commodity type foods at these prices.Justin: Aside from plant-based meat, what other developments in the food industry should we expect? I recently read that insect-based foods might be needed to deal with overpopulation. What do you think?Doug: First of all, it’s too bad that most meat today is produced in an industrial manner. The conditions under which cattle, hogs, and chickens are produced are absolutely disgusting. The animals are full of steroids and antibiotics. And they’re often fed what amounts to cardboard. The entire process is very unaesthetic. I avoid industrial meat, milk, and eggs whenever possible. There’s a lot of truth to the saying “you are what you eat”, and nobody needs more steroids and antibiotics.But I’m not worried about the growing population. The population all over the world is actually dropping, particularly in North America, Europe, and Japan. And that’s not likely to change. It’s actually likely to accelerate. It’s even happening in China, the Middle East, and South America.The only place where population is growing is in Africa. Africans can’t feed themselves as it stands. They certainly won’t be able to if their population triples by the end of this century. Unless the continent completely reforms its political and economic systems, it’s in trouble. The whole continent is a welfare case, sucking capital out of the rest of the world.Contrary to most projections, however, I believe the population of Africa could collapse at some point – not for the reasons populations are declining in the developed world, but because they don’t produce anything. Africa doesn’t have the infrastructure, the capital base, or the political/economic environment to change that in the near term. The Central African Republic is much closer to reality than the country of Wakanda portrayed in the movie Black Panther. Anyway, they’re not competing with us for expensive foods like meat and fish. They’re competitors for subsistence foods.As for grubs and insects I’ve tried many of them when I was living in Thailand and Hong Kong. They can be very tasty. But, even there, they’re a specialty item. When they’re bred in meaningful quantities, however, they’ll be ground into mulch. Then they won’t be a delicacy for rich people, but subsistence protein for poor people. In any event, not a consideration for many years to come.Here’s the bottom line. It’s time to get long commodities.Justin: Great stuff. Thanks, Doug.Doug: You’re welcome.Justin’s note: As Doug said, now is a great time to bet on commodities.Our in-house commodities expert Dave Forest agrees. He says we’re entering the next “supercycle”… and smart investors stand to make a fortune.And just like Doug and I talked about today, he sees agriculture stocks specifically as one of the top ways to take advantage.The best part is, Dave just found the perfect way to profit. He just wrote about it in the latest issue of International Speculator, which subscribers can access here.If you’re not a subscriber, you can learn more, including another massive opportunity on Dave’s radar, by clicking here.last_img read more

FutureProof Your Career By Learning How to Code for Less Than 40

first_img 2019 Entrepreneur 360 List Add to Queue –shares Contributor Next Article Hone your programming skills on a shoestring budget with this nine-part training bundle. Apply Now » 4 min read Disclosure: Our goal is to feature products and services that we think you’ll find interesting and useful. If you purchase them, Entrepreneur may get a small share of the revenue from the sale from our commerce partners.center_img Future-Proof Your Career By Learning How to Code for Less Than $40 Entrepreneur Store Apple’s late founder Steve Jobs once said, “I think everybody in this country should learn how to program a computer because it teaches you how to think.” Today, a coding education does far more than that—it makes your future self employable.You think our world is computer-reliant now? Just wait a few years: Due to “greater emphasis on cloud computing, the collection and storage of big data, and information security”, the Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that IT employment will grow 13 percent by the time 2026 rolls around—faster than the average for all occupations. And with 800 million jobs worldwide predicted to be under threat of automation by 2030, even further growth over the next decade would be hardly surprising.Learning how to code, then, is a surefire way to extend your career’s shelf life, and no program makes that task easier than the Complete Learn to Code Master Class Bundle. Comprised of nine different courses, it’s a beginner-friendly education in all things coding. Here’s what’s included: Basic Introduction To C++ For Beginners (a $199.99 value)Gain fluency in the C++ programming language across three hours of learning in this step-by-step, hands-on course. Designed to be learned at your own pace, it’ll show you how to write C++ programs from scratch so you have a solid foundation on which to develop your skills.Become A Full Stack Web Developer: Beginner To Advanced (a $199.99 value)Full-stack developers are the apples of the programming world’s eye, as they’re proficient in both front- and back-end development. Add this lucrative skill set to your roster with this project-packed course on full-stack dev tools and the PHP framework Laravel.Build Responsive Real World Websites with HTML5 and CSS3 (a $199.99 value)Learn how to build the responsive website of your dreams from scratch by enrolling in this 11-hour class on HTML5, CSS3, and jQuery. Its 77 lessons are enhanced with helpful video tutorials led by self-taught web designer and developer Jonas Schmedtmann.JavaScript Essentials: Get Started With Web Coding (a $199.99 value)Want to create interactive web content? You’ll need to know how to use JavaScript. This class is a great crash course in the programming language that’ll hone the skills you need in order to harness its capabilities for a fully functional and engaging site.C# 7 & .NET Core 2.0 Recipes (a $124 value)The multi-paradigm programming language C# (pronounced “C-sharp”) can be used to build a variety of applications on the .NET framework. Featuring five hours of content, this course will both introduce you to both tools and show you how to use their latest versions to create apps.The Complete Google Go Programming Course For Beginners (a $199.99 value)As the first development language designed specifically for modern multi-core CPU computers, Google Go has become ultra-popular in recent years. You’ll explore it in-depth when you enroll in this course, which features 51 lectures and five hours of content that’s available 24/7.From 0 to 1: Learn Python Programming Easy as Pie (a $49 value)The programming language Python is virtually ubiquitous, so you’d better learn how to use it, and use it well. This class will show you how to do just that with 10-plus hours of learning that covers data manipulation, machine learning implementation, text processing, website-scraping, and other uses of Python.Java Programming for Beginners (a $99 value)Speaking of must-know languages, meet Java. (It’s contributed to just about every web app or website, FYI.) This 50-lesson class is comprised of video lectures, lab exercises, and code examples that will give you a detailed understanding of Java programming.Git Complete: The Definitive, Step-By-Step Guide (a $99 value)Invaluable to software engineers, Git is a distributed version control system used to track and manage changes in computer files. After showing you how to install it on your Mac or Windows device, this course will demonstrate various Git commands and walk you through its uses in programming.A $1,370.95 value, lifetime access to the Complete Learn to Code Master Class Bundle is normally sold in the Entrepreneur Store for $79. Act fast, though, and you can score it for just $39 — a savings of 97 percent. Image credit: Danial RiCaRoS The only list that measures privately-held company performance across multiple dimensions—not just revenue. January 9, 2019 Programmerslast_img read more

Betfair to sponsor £1m King George

first_img Support The Guardian Share via Email Betfair to sponsor £1m King George This article is more than 10 years old Share via Email Share on Facebook Horse racing Share on Pinterest @Greg_Wood_ Wed 3 Dec 2008 19.01 EST Greg Wood Horse racing Share on Twitter … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. The Recap: sign up for the best of the Guardian’s sport coverage “We are delighted to have the opportunity to work with Ascot on this ground-breaking agreement, especially as it will take us up to and beyond the course’s historic tercentenary in 2011,” Stephen Burn, Betfair’s director of horseracing, said yesterday. “Betfair’s first market was the Oaks in 2000, when 36 people had a bet. It is extraordinary that less than 10 years later we are involved in a deal like this.” Ascot will hope and expect that a seven-figure purse will bolster the prestige of the King George in the face of competition from the major autumn events, including the Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe and the Breeders’ Cup. The best three-year-olds in particular have tended to bypass the race in recent season, to give them time to recover from the Classics and prepare for September and October. The presence, or otherwise, of the Derby winner in next year’s race could be an early test of whether money alone can reverse that trend.Paul Blockley has withdrawn his appeal against the British Horseracing Authority’s decision to disqualify him from racing for 2½ years. The Lambourn trainer was banned in October as part of an investigation in connection with the alleged laying of horses to lose in 11 races that took place between March 2004 and December 2005.Ron Cox’s tip of the dayOld Brigade 3.20 WincantonThe amateur rider Anthony Knott, who has a race named for him elsewhere on this card, got his 15 minutes of fame after winning on Wise Men Say here a fortnight ago. The horse has been raised only 8lb and has the able Joe Tizzard in the plate this time but the form of that race is dubious. Dual winner Old Brigade has more solid credentials after an easy win at Exeter last time.center_img news This article is more than 10 years old First published on Wed 3 Dec 2008 19.01 EST Share on Messenger Read more Betfair, the internet’s dominant betting exchange, cemented its place in the betting and racing establishment yesterday less than nine years after its launch, when it was unveiled as the new sponsor of the King George VI and Queen Elizabeth Stakes at Ascot. The five-year deal, which will raise the value of the race to a minimum of £1m for the first time, follows two seasons in which the Royal racecourse has endured the embarrassment of running its premier event without a sponsor. Yesterday’s deal goes well beyond the King George itself, with the three-day late July meeting due to be rebranded as “Betfair Weekend”. The track’s most valuable steeplechase, run as the First Commercial Chase until the credit crunch forced David Johnson, the leading jumps owner, to withdraw his support, will now become the Betfair Ascot Chase, and is likely to form part of the Betfair Million bonus scheme from next season. The tie-up between Ascot and Betfair has clear benefits for both sides. Ascot has secured a major new sponsorship in the midst of the economic gloom. Betfair, meanwhile, is now the second biggest sponsor in racing after the Tote, and has acquired the benefits of cachet and respectability that only the Queen’s racecourse can offer. Derby Day is the working-class event at heart, staged on public land, while Cheltenham is where the country set like to be seen. Ascot, though, has been unashamedly upper-class ever since it was founded by Queen Anne nearly 300 years ago. Betfair’s reach will even extend to branding on the starting stalls during the Royal meeting in June. The exchange’s biggest players, meanwhile, will be intrigued by the possibility of being treated like royalty in an on-site “Betfair Lounge”. Share on WhatsApp Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share on LinkedIn Shares00 Since you’re here… Topics Reuse this contentlast_img read more

Novel noninvasive test for diagnosing gut diseases

first_imgThe usual strategy for diagnosing and monitoring IBD is based on a colonoscopy, which is invasive, often requires anesthesia, and assesses structural lesions, rather than gut malfunction. Gut disorders can happen before there are visible structural changes, so diagnosing based on functional tests evaluating gut leakage could allow clinicians to detect the disease earlier. While there is no cure for IBD, it is controllable. Early diagnosis would enable patients to control symptoms before they became severe, improving their quality of life.This new research provides a non-invasive, simple test that could not only be useful for diagnosing IBD, but also other gut disorders, such as celiac disease and food allergies. It’s also helpful for detecting diseases that result in a leaky gut, such as heart failure, high blood pressure and liver ailments.Marcin Ufnal, senior author on the study said: Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 27 2019Gut diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are increasingly prevalent worldwide, especially in industrialized countries. In 2015 alone, 250,000 people in the UK were diagnosed with IBD, and 3 million in the United States. Symptoms can include pain and swelling of the stomach, bloody diarrhea, weight loss and extreme tiredness.A new study in Experimental Physiology proposes a novel, non-invasive test for assessing gut function that may help screen and monitor treatment of gut diseases using only a small sample (1 mL) of blood and stool. How well your gut functions is determined by the gut-blood barrier, a complex multi-layer system. This can be compared to a fine-tuned filter that precisely controls the passage of nutrients and prevents bacteria passing from inside the bowel into the bloodstream.Related StoriesResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairRaw meat can act as reservoir for bacteria associated with hospital infectionsNew methods to recognize antimicrobial resistant bacteria and how they workIn those with IBD, and other intestinal diseases, the gut-blood barrier is impaired. Here the intestinal wall is more like a ripped sieve, allowing more bacterial products to pass from the gut into the blood. This is commonly referred to as a leaky gut.This test measures the concentration of gut bacterial products (produced by bacteria during metabolism) in the patient’s blood and stool. The authors believe that with further research this assessment of gut leakage will be very important in the diagnosis and treatment of IBD and other intestinal diseases. (See related video for more on the science of leaky gut and the gut-to-blood permeability ratio). This may be a very important tool for diagnosis and treatment of gut and other diseases, using the leaky gut as a marker for disease, as well as a potential target for treatment. “center_img Source:The Physiological SocietyJournal reference:Jaworska, K. et al. (2019) Inflammatory bowel disease associates with increased gut-to-blood penetration of SCFA: a new, non-invasive marker of a functional intestinal lesion. Experimental Physiology. doi.org/10.1113/EP087773.last_img read more

Doomed EgyptAir Airbus should not have taken off French report says

first_imgAn Airbus jet operated by EgyptAir that crashed over the Mediterranean almost three years ago, killing all 66 people on board, should have been grounded because of a series of technical issues on previous flights, according to a French investigation. Antoine Lachenaud, a lawyer for the family of Clement Daeschner-Cormary, a 26-year-old passenger who died, said the report showed that the crash was due to error and not chance.”When warnings are ignored in a systematic manner this results in a crash and it becomes impossible to maintain that this is due to chance,” he said.”Based on this report and the investigations, there should be consequences over the responsibilities of those involved.”The report says the on-the-ground technician in Paris had no reason to stop the flight from taking off, since no alert of the plane’s previous problems had been given.But it does highlight eventual shortcomings in the competence and accreditation of the technician responsible for checking the plane for the return flight while it was on the ground in Paris.Cockpit fire?It also notes that the casing of the oxygen mask for the co-pilot was replaced for unknown reasons three days before the crash.”The replacement of this equipment requires careful checking, given the danger of oxygen leaks,” the experts wrote.A report published last year by France’s Bureau of Enquiry and Analysis for Civil Aviation Safety (BEA) said its main hypothesis was that a fire erupted in the cockpit which rapidly got out of control.A second report requested by the French judges is expected to determine if smartphones and tablets left in the cockpit could have led to the fire.A source close to the case, who asked not to be identified, said French investigators had started to analyse a copy of one of the “black box” voice recordings from the cockpit.They received the recordings after the Egyptian security authorities ended their investigation.In December 2016, Cairo officials said traces of explosives had been found on the remains of some victims, but French authorities were sceptical, as no organisation had claimed responsibility for any attack. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2019 AFP Explore further Investigators are not certain what exactly caused the crash Black boxes: Crucial to air crash probes French experts point to ‘considerable lack of rigour on the part of crew and the technical services of EgyptAir’ ‘Warnings ignored’ Citation: Doomed EgyptAir Airbus ‘should not have taken off’, French report says (2019, April 4) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-04-doomed-egyptair-airbus-french.html The report, ordered by the French judiciary, stops short of drawing firm conclusions about the precise cause of the disaster but makes clear a serious of previous issues with the plane should not have been ignored.Flight MS804, which was bound from Paris’s Charles de Gaulle airport to Cairo, plunged into the sea between Crete and the northern coast of Egypt after disappearing from radars. All passengers and crew on board, including 40 Egyptians and 15 French citizens, lost their lives in the crash of the A320.The Egyptian authorities rapidly suggested that the crash was due to an attack, but French officials have always preferred the theory that it was caused by a technical problem.Three Paris judges investigating the case ordered two probes to reconstruct the sequence of events that led to the crash, with results from the first handed over to magistrates in June. In the document of 76 pages, first reported by the Le Parisien newspaper and seen by AFP, the two experts complain of “the considerable lack of rigour on the part of crew and the technical services of EgyptAir” in processing the aircraft’s technical documents. ‘Recurring faults’The report, by a technical expert and an aeronautic expert, says there were several incidents concerning the operation of the aircraft which were not reported by the pilots and thus not followed up by maintenance teams. These faults “were not signalled when the aircraft was at its principal base in Cairo, apparently so that it would not be grounded for repairs”. “The examination has shown that this aircraft should have been subject to checks during its four previous flights and should not have taken off from Cairo after a sequence of recurring faults which were not signalled by successive crews.” But they stop short of drawing a conclusion on what caused the crash, saying the “study of the elements” at their disposal “does not allow to determine if the accident resulted from the different technical issues”.Yet they point to suspicions that one of the faults “could have been the precursor of a major electrical failure”.last_img read more