Gayle flies home for birth of first child

first_imgKINGSTON, Jamaica (CMC): Cricket superstar Chris Gayle will miss a couple of matches in the Indian Premier League (IPL) after flying out to be with his partner for the birth of his first child, media outlets in India are reporting. Several media outlets have quoted a source close to Gayle’s franchise, Royal Challengers Bangalore (RCB), as confirming that the flamboyant opening batsman left with the team’s blessing. Media reports from Jamaica also quote local sources as saying that Gayle and his partner, Natasha Berridge, are expecting the child to be delivered this week. Gayle, 36, is expected to rejoin RCB on Monday and will be absent for their games against the Mumbai Indians and the Rising Pune Supergiants this week. Gayle has not had the best start to the IPL, scoring just one and a duck in the first two matches. “I am confident that Gayle can come up with runs when the team needs it,” said Virat Kohli, the RCB captain. “You can certainly be rest assured that Gayle will come good as the tournament progresses. He would score a century when the team will need it. I am not too worried about Gayle because the other guys are stepping up nicely,” added Kohli. Gayle’s team management has not commented on his departure, but a picture he posted on his Instagram page stated: “I’m on my way Baby.” Gayle is also reported to have thanked Qatar Airways for its services, which included a congratulatory cake.last_img read more

Banyana share spoils with Zimbabwe

first_img15 April 2014South Africa’s women’s football team, Banyana Banyana, showed plenty of character to come from behind to draw 2-2 with Zimbabwe in an entertaining friendly international at the Dobsonville Stadium in Soweto on Saturday afternoon.Playing under new coach Vera Pauw, South Africa fell 0-2 behind but fought their way back before a boisterous crowd to claim a deserved share of the spoils.It was the hosts that started with lots of running, but were somehow undone by the long balls, which the Zimbabwe backline easily dealt with.PenaltyFrom their very first counter-attack, Zimbabwe’s Rutendo Makore got the better of Letago Madiba in a one-on-one situation. The robust Madiba was forced into bringing down Makore, leaving referee Maria Kolokotoane with little choice but to award a penalty, which Makore dispatched with ease in the seventh minute.Sensing Banyana Banyana’s problems dealing with long balls, Zimbabwe pumped high balls in the penalty area. From one of those attacks, Marjory Nyaumwe outpaced the static home team’s defence and blasted the ball past Roxanne Barker no chance to make it 2-0.Zimbabwe could have been 3-0 ahead, but Makore’s audacious effort moments later hit the crossbar.Out of their shellBanyana Banyana then came out of their shell and after good work between Refiloe Jane and Silindile Ngubane the latter’s shot hit the bar as the South Africans started to threaten the visitors.At last, after incessant pressure, a goal came on the stroke of half-time when Ngubane’s shot gave Dzingirai no chance, making it 2-1 to the visitors at the break.In the second half, South Africa pinned Zimbabwe pinned in their own half, but the visitors’ back four, well marshalled by Melody Musasa, stood firm.Robyn Moodaly could have equalised for Banyana Banyana but her long range effort was brilliantly parried behind for a corner by Chido Dzingirai as Zimbabwe hung on for dear life.CampedPauw’s charges then camped into the visitors’ area, but brave goalkeeping by Dzingirai frustrated the home side, with Jane seeing her effort skim the crossbar as Banyana Banyana upped the ante.Former captain Amanda Dlamini, who was introduced as a late substitute, had a point blank header saved by Dzingirai as Zimbabweans clung onto their lead and South African pushed hard for an equaliser.EqualiserThe vibrant crowd raised the tempo, cheering on the home as Banyana Banyana chased the elusive goal and the hard-running Dlamini was rewarded as South Africa made it 2-2 after Zimbabwe finally cracked under pressure.It was a well-deserved draw for Pauw’s team, which played with more purpose and were by far the better side in the second half.Zimbabwe could have stolen a win late in the match, but Barker produced a one- handed save from Felistas Muzongondi after the goalkeeper had been left exposed by her defence.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

Heating with a Minisplit Heat Pump

first_imgThirty-five years ago, when I first got involved with energy efficiency and renewable energy, the mere suggestion that one might heat with electricity would be scoffed at by those of us seeking alternatives to fossil fuels.Amory Lovins, founder of the Rocky Mountain Institute, likened using electricity for heating to “cutting butter with a chainsaw.” Electricity is a high-grade form of energy; it doesn’t make sense to use it for a low-grade need like heating, he argued. It made much more sense, we all agreed, to produce that 75-degree warmth with solar collectors or passive-solar design.So, it’s a big surprise that I’m now arguing that electricity can be the smartest way to heat a house. And that’s what we’re doing in the farmhouse we’re rebuilding in Dummerston. I should note, here, that all of our electricity is being supplied by a solar array on our barn. Our Mitsubishi heat pumpWe installed a state-of-the-art Mitsubishi M-Series FE18NA heat pump that is rated at 21,600 Btu/hour for heating and 18,000 Btu/hour (1 1/2 tons) for cooling. Marc Rosenbaum, P.E. ran heat load calculations showing peak heating demand (assuming –5°F outside temperature) about 23,000 Btu/hour, assuming the air leakage we measured several months ago, before the house envelope was completed. If the air leakage ends up being cut in half from that measured level, the design heat load would drop to a little over 19,000 Btu/hour.We think the FE18NA model will work fine for nearly all conditions, but we are also installing a small wood stove — the smallest model made by Jøtul — for use on exceptionally cold nights.The indoor unit of our heat pump is about 43 inches long by 13 inches tall by 9 3/8 inches deep. It is installed high on a wall extending in from the west wall of the house, next to an open stairway to the second floor; it is controlled with a hand-held remote. The outdoor unit, installed just off a screen porch on the west side of the house, is 35 inches tall by 33 inches wide by 13 inches deep. It is located under an overhang and held off the ground by granite blocking.ARC Mechanical from Keene, New Hampshire, did a great job with installation, and the system has now been turned on. We won’t move in until December, but it’s nice to know we have heat. Point-source heating and coolingDuctless minisplit heat pumps are ideally suited for compact, highly energy-efficient homes. Our house has R-values greater than R-40 in the walls and R-50 in the roof, plus very tight construction. We also have a heat-recovery ventilator (HRV) for fresh air. In tight, superinsulated homes, a single space heater (point-source heating system) can work very well, because with all the insulation fairly uniform temperatures are maintained throughout the house.With our 1,700 square-foot house, the two upstairs bedrooms may stay a little cooler than the downstairs, but we like a cooler bedroom. In a larger house or one that isn’t as well insulated, several ductless minisplit heat pumps or a ducted heat pump option might be required. Alex is founder of BuildingGreen, Inc. and executive editor of Environmental Building News. In 2012 he founded the Resilient Design Institute. To keep up with Alex’s latest articles and musings, you can sign up for his Twitter feed. Installing a Ductless Minisplit SystemHeating a Tight, Well-Insulated House Will Minisplits Replace Forced-Air Heating and Cooling Systems?Air-Source or Ground-Source Heat Pump?Product Guide: Mitsubishi Mr. Slim Ductless MinisplitGBA Encyclopedia: Ductless Minisplit Heat Pumps Heat pump basicsHeating with electricity makes sense if instead of using that electricity directly to produce heat — through electric-resistance strip heaters — we use a device called a heat pump. For every one unit of energy consumed (as electricity), two to three units of energy (as heat) are delivered. This makes heat pumps significantly less expensive to operate than oil or propane heating systems in terms of dollars per delivered unit of heat. RELATED ARTICLES Heat pumps use electricity in a seemingly magic way, to move heat from one place to another and upgrade the temperature of that heat in the process. Heat pumps seem like magic because they can extract heat from a place that’s cold — like Vermont’s outdoor air in January, or underground — and deliver it to a place that’s a lot warmer.Very significantly, heat pumps can be switched from heating mode to cooling mode with a flip of a switch. In the cooling mode, they work just like a standard air conditioner.Ground-source or geothermal heat pumps rely on the ground (or groundwater) as the heat source in the heating mode (and as the heat sink for cooling), while air-source heat pumps use the outside air as the heat source and heat sink. Because temperatures underground are much warmer than the outside air in winter, the efficiency of ground-source heat pumps is typically higher than that of air-source heat pumps.But ground-source heat pumps are really expensive. Friends in southern Vermont have spent $35,000 — or even more — to install residential-sized ground-source heat pumps. The cost is so high because of the cost of trenching or drilling wells.By contrast, air-source heat pumps are much simpler and far less expensive. The most common types today — and what we installed at Leonard Farm — are referred to as ductless minisplit heat pumps. There is an outdoor compressor (a box about 3 feet on a side and 1 foot deep), an indoor unit (evaporator with blower) that mounts on an interior wall, and copper tubing that carries refrigerant between the two.The typical installed cost of a ductless minisplit system is $3,000 to $5,000, though many variables affect the cost.These air-source heat pumps are viable today, even in cold climates, because of dramatic improvements in the past few decades. Much of this innovation has been driven by Japanese companies, including Mitsubishi, Daikin, Fujitsu, and Sanyo (now part of Panasonic).Several decades ago, air-source heat pumps only made sense in climates that rarely dropped below 30°F in the winter; today some of these systems, including ours, will function well at temperatures below zero degrees F.last_img read more