Roccos Restaurant To Hold Breakfast With The Easter Bunny On April 13

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Rocco’s Restaurant (193 Main Street) is holding a Breakfast with the Easter Bunny on Saturday, April 13, 2019, from 10am to noon. There will be fun, photos, and baskets for bunnies of all ages.The Bunny Buffet Menu includes:Scrambled eggsSausageBaconPancakesHash brownsCerealYogurtFruit – watermelon, cantaloupe, grapesHomemade blueberry, chocolate chip, and corn muffinsRefillable beverages – coffee, tea, and soda.Non refillable beverages – Apple juice, orange juice, cranberry juice, grapefruit, pineapple juice, milk and chocolate milk.Call the restaurant at 978-657-7361 for pricing and reservations.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedPHOTOS: Wilmington Sons of Italy Holds Easter Bunny BreakfastIn “Photo of the Day”Wilmington’s Annual Easter Bunny Breakfast Set For April 14 (UPDATED)In “Community”Wilmington’s Annual Easter Bunny Breakfast Set For April 9In “Community”last_img read more

Volkswagen will let other companies use its MEB electriccar platform

first_img • Geneva Motor Show 2019 71 Photos Volkswagen’s I.D. Buggy is the electric dune buggy of our dreams Tags Electric Cars Car Industry 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better See All reading • Volkswagen will let other companies use its MEB electric-car platform Enlarge ImageVW says that MEB would be ideal for low-volume specialty vehicles. Volkswagen Volkswagen’s plan to offer a wide range of electric cars — one the company has affectionately called a rollout of “electric cars for millions, not millionaires” — is all based around its new MEB modular EV chassis. At the Geneva Motor Show, VW announced it’ll open things up and let other companies use MEB to make their own EVs, too.The decision serves two purposes for Volkswagen. First, by selling more MEB chassis kits, it can amortize the cost of developing the new battery-electric technology. Second, it furthers the automaker’s stated goal of encouraging electric mobility in the fight against emissions.”The MEB is to establish itself as the standard for e-mobility. Based on the MEB, we will make individual mobility CO2-neutral, safe, comfortable and accessible to as many people as possible,” Herbert Deiss, Volkswagen AG CEO, said in a statement.The first such partner is Aachen, Germany-based e.Go Mobile, which will use MEB to make a new electric car. Neither company has said what the vehicle will be, but Volkswagen says that MEB is flexible enough that it can be used for small-volume, unconventional vehicles. Perhaps the best example of that is the I.D. Buggy concept shown at Geneva: Like the original Meyers Manx, VW hints the I.D. Buggy’s body could easily be separated from its mechanical chassis. Best of all, VW may even build an electric buggy inspired by the concept.Volkswagen says it expects a “first wave” of 15 million vehicles to be built on the MEB platform. That’ll include the I.D. family models under the VW brand as well as potential models from other brands, like Seat, Skoda and Audi. Mar 8 • VW is still ‘100 percent’ investigating a pickup truck for the US Mar 7 • The Ferrari F8 Tributo is the last of the nonhybrid V8scenter_img 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous Volkswagen Share your voice More From Roadshow Geneva Motor Show 2019 Volkswagen 0 2020 Porsche 911 Carrera S Cabriolet first drive: The uber-roadster Mar 7 • New Peugeot 208 debuts i-Cockpit with 3D HUD Combo dashboard Post a comment Apr 17 • The 2020 Jaguar XE gets its first major visual refreshlast_img read more

Dish launches 4K streaming stick AirTV Mini with access to Netflix Sling

first_img An Echo Dot makes a fine match for any Fire edition TV, because you can use the latter to say things like, “Alexa, turn on the TV.” Right now, the 24-inch Insignia Fire TV Edition starts at just $100, while the 32-inch Toshiba Fire TV Editions is on sale for $130. Just add any Fire TV Edition to your cart, then add a third-gen Echo Dot, and presto: The latter is free. Recently updated to include digital-photo-frame capabilities, the Lenovo Smart Clock brings Google Assistant goodness to your nightstand. It’s a little smaller than the Amazon Echo Show 5, but also a full $30 less (and tied with Prime Day pricing) during this Best Buy Labor Day sale. Apple AirPods with Wireless Charging Case: $155 (save $45) See it $6 at Tidal Mentioned Above Apple iPhone XS (64GB, space gray) Post a comment $999 Share your voice Tags Sprint Best Buy Angela Lang/CNET Sarah Tew/CNET What’s cooler: A snapshot of a firework exploding in front of you, or full 360-degree video of all the fireworks and all the reactions to seeing them? Oooh, ahhh, indeed. At $250, the compact Rylo dual-lens camera is selling for its lowest price yet. And for an extra $50, you can get the bundle that includes the waterproof housing.This deal runs through Sept. 3; it usually costs $500. Best laptops for college students: We’ve got an affordable laptop for every student. Best live TV streaming services: Ditch your cable company but keep the live channels and DVR. 0 Spotify and most other streaming services rely on compressed audio, which robs the listener of full fidelity. Enter Tidal, the only “major” service that delivers lossless audio — meaning at least on par with CD quality, if not better. Want to see (er, hear) the difference for yourself? Grab this excellent extended trial while you can. It’s just $6 for three months, and it’s good for up to six listeners. Read Google Home Hub review Rylo 5.8K 360 Video Camera: $250 (save $250) Lenovo Smart Clock: $59.99 (save $20) Turo is kind of like Uber meets Airbnb: You borrow someone’s car, but you do all the driving. I’ve used it many times and found it a great alternative to traditional car-rental services — in part because you get to choose exactly the vehicle you want (not just, say, “midsize”) and in part because you can often do pickup and dropoff right outside baggage claim.Between now and Sept. 1, the first 300 people to check out can get $30 off any Turo rental with promo code LDW30. HP Laptop 15t Value: $520 (save $780) $60 at Best Buy JBL Soundgear wearable speaker: $90 (save $160) DJI Osmo Action camera: $261 (save $89) Sarah Tew/CNET Media Streamers $999 Read DJI Osmo Action preview Boost Mobile Read the AirPods review Review • Sling TV review: The best budget live TV streaming service Review • iPhone XS review, updated: A few luxury upgrades over the XR Other Labor Day sales you should check out Best Buy: In addition to some pretty solid MacBook deals that have been running for about a week already, Best Buy is offering up to 40% off major appliances like washers, dryers and stoves. There are also gift cards available with the purchase of select appliances. See it at Best BuyDell: Through Aug. 28, Dell is offering an extra 12% off various laptops, desktops and electronics. And check back starting Aug. 29 for a big batch of Labor Day doorbusters. See it at DellGlassesUSA: Aug. 29 – Sept. 3 only, you can save 65% on all frames with promo code labor65. See it at GlassesUSALenovo: The tech company is offering a large assortment of deals and doorbusters through Labor Day, with the promise of up to 56% off certain items — including, at this writing, the IdeaPad 730S laptop for $700 (save $300).See it at LenovoLensabl: Want to keep the frames you already love and paid for? Lensabl lets you mail them in for new lenses, based on your prescription. From now through Sept. 2 only, you can save 20% on the blue light-blocking lens option with promo code BLOCKBLUE. See it at LensablSears: Between now and Sept. 7, you can save up to 40% on appliances (plus an additional 10% if you shop online), up to 60% on mattresses, up to 50% on Craftsman products and more. The store is also offering some fairly hefty cashback bonuses. See it at SearsNote: This post was published previously and is continuously updated with new information.CNET’s Cheapskate scours the web for great deals on tech products and much more. For the latest deals and updates, follow the Cheapskate on Facebook and Twitter. Questions about the Cheapskate blog? Find the answers on our FAQ page, and find more great buys on the CNET Deals page. Read the Rylo camera preview Preview • iPhone XS is the new $1,000 iPhone X $229 Share your voice I thought this might be a mistake, but, no, the weirdly named HP Laptop 15t Value is indeed quite the value at this price. Specs include an Intel Core i7 processor, 12GB of RAM, a 256GB solid-state drive and a 15.6-inch display. However, I strongly recommend paying an extra $50 to upgrade that display to FHD (1,920×1,080), because you’re not likely to be happy with the native 1,366×768 resolution. Tags See It $999 $299 at Amazon Chris Monroe/CNET See it Use promo code 19LABOR10 to get an unusually good deal on JBL’s interesting hybrid product — not quite headphones, and not quite a traditional speaker, but something you wear like neckphones to listen to music on the go. Free Echo Dot with an Insignia or Toshiba TV (save $50) Comments $155 at Google Express CNET may get a commission from retail offers. Mini Netflix,I’m shocked — shocked! — to learn that stores are turning Labor Day into an excuse to sell stuff. Wait — no, I’m not. As much as I respect the original intent of the holiday (which became official back in 1894), to most of us, it’s just a bonus day off — one that’s blissfully tacked onto a weekend. So, yeah, stores; go ahead, run your sales. I’m listening. Perhaps unsurprisingly, Labor Day doesn’t bring out bargains to compete with the likes of Black Friday (which will be here before you know it), but there are definitely some sales worth your time.For example:We’ve rounded up the best Labor Day mattress deals.We’ve also gathered the best Labor Day laptop deals at Best Buy.The 2019 Vizio P Series Quantum is back under $999.Be sure to check out Amazon’s roughly three dozen Labor Day deals on TVs and audio. Google Express is having a big sale as well, one that includes deals on game consoles, AirPods, iPhones, laptops and more.Below I’ve rounded up a handful of individual items I consider to be the cream of the crop, followed by a handy reference guide to other Labor Day sales. Keep in mind, of course, that products may sell out at any time, even if the sale itself is still running. Note that CNET may get a share of revenue from the sale of the products featured on this page. Rylo $210 at Best Buy Read Lenovo Smart Clock review News • Sling TV review: The best budget live TV streaming service AirTV Mini integrates Sling TV, Netflix and over-the-air channels into one user interface. AirTV Mini AirTV, a subsidiary of satellite broadcaster Dish Network, on Monday introduced AirTV Mini, a 4K streaming stick that lets users access Sling TV, Netflix and over-the-air channels in one place. AirTV Mini is powered by Android TV and costs $79.99.Users can plug the device into their television’s HDMI port to access the Sling TV app, with which Netflix is integrated. They can also access apps from Google Play, as well as over-the-air channels when AirTV Mini is combined with the AirTV Wi-Fi-enabled network tuner and an over-the-air antenna.AirTV Mini features a button for accessing Google Assistant on the remote, as well as one for launching the Netflix app. There’s also a Sling TV shortcut button and voice search button. New and eligible Sling TV customers can get the AirTV Wi-Fi-enabled network tuner and indoor antenna for free after prepaying for three months of Sling TV.  Sling TV $59 at eBay See at Turo Sarah Tew/CNET See at Amazon Turo: Save $30 on any car rental Google Nest Hub: $59 (save $70) $999 See It Though not technically a Labor Day sale, it’s happening during Labor Day sale season — and it’s too good not to share. Nationwide Distributors, via Google Express, has just about the best AirPods deal we’ve seen (when you apply promo code ZBEDWZ at checkout). This is for the second-gen AirPods with the wireless charging case. Can’t imagine these will last long at this price, so if you’re interested, act fast. Amazon Mentioned Above Sling TV Tidal 3-month family subscription: $5.99 (save $54) $261 at Daily Steals via Google Express DJI’s answer to GoPro’s action cameras is rugged little model that’s shockproof, dustproof and waterproof down to 11 meters. It normally runs $350, but this deal drops it to $261 when you apply promo code 19LABOR10 at checkout. CNET may get a commission from retail offers. Lenovo 130-15AST 15.6-inch laptop: $210 (save $90) Turo Apple iPhone XS Formerly known as the Google Home Hub, Google’s Nest Hub packs a wealth of Google Assistant goodness into a 7-inch screen. At $59, this is within a buck of the best price we’ve seen. It lists for $129 and sells elsewhere in the $89-to-$99 range.This is one item of many available as part of eBay’s Labor Day Sale (which, at this writing, doesn’t specifically mention Labor Day, but that’s how it was pitched to us). $520 at HP The problem with most entry-level laptops: They come with mechanical hard drives. That makes for a mighty slow Windows experience. This Lenovo model features a 128GB solid-state drive, so it should be pretty quick to boot and load software, even with its basic processor. Plus, it has a DVD-burner! That’s not something you see in many modern laptops, especially at this price. 7 Sarah Tew/CNET The Cheapskate See It TVs Speakers Mobile Accessories Cameras Laptops Automobiles Smart Speakers & Displays $90 at Daily Steals via Google Expresslast_img read more

Two siblings drown

first_imgTwo siblings drowned in a pond in Sharsha upazila of Jashore district on Friday morning.The deceased are Rezwan, 7, and his sister Maria, 6, son and daughter of a certain Kamarul Islam of Sikarpur village in the upazila reports UNB.Gorpara police camp sub-inspector Sheikh Lutfar Rahman said the two went to a local pond for taking bath in the morning and drowned.Locals spotted the bodies floating on the water and recovered them, he added.After taking those to the Upazila Health Complex, the on-duty doctors declared them dead.last_img read more

One project cannot solve all problems of a community

first_imgNoted economist Wahiduddin Mahmud addresses the inaigural session of a two-day convention on the excluded communities in Sreemangal, Moulvibazar, on Thursday. — Photo: CollectedA convention of the excluded people in Sreemangal, Moulvibazar, on Thursday called for identifying unique problems of the marginalised communities with a view to bringing them to the mainstream.“Marginalised people are poor but the nature of their problems is not the same. So, they cannot be brought under mainstream development activities by taking only one project,” economist Wahiduddin Mahmud told the inaugural ceremony of the conference.He pointed out that the country’s 3-4 per cent people are excluded from the development process and without giving them fruits of development, it is not possible to attain overall national development goals.Wahiduddin Mahmud, a former finance adviser to the 1996 caretaker government, added that it is the responsibility of the government to take meaningful initiatives to ensure protection and development of the marginalised communities.More than 300 people of 60 communities have joined the convention and cultural festival that focussed on their lifestyle, standard of living, social crisis and cultural practices, according to a news release received in Dhaka.Power and Participation Research Centre (PPCR), Society for Environment and Human Development (SEHD), Christian Commission for Development in Bangladesh (CCDB) and Gram Bikash Kendra organised the two-day convention titled ‘Social, Economic, and Political Protection of Marginalised and Excluded Communities’.PPARC executive chairman Hossain Zillur Rahman said the convention is aimed at making policy recommendations so that the government can take necessary steps to improve the situation. “We want to help create such an atmosphere,” he said.Vice chancellor of Shahjalal University of Science and Technology Farid Uddin Ahmed criticised the practice of keeping marginalised groups such as tea workers poor for the sake of an industry.“We all have to work together to take the society forward and uphold the spirit of humanity,” he added.SEHD’s Phillip Gain presented the keynote at the convention which was also addressed by writer Harishanker Jaladas, former director general of Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics Abdul Wazed, and deputy commissioner of Moulvibazar Tafael Islam.last_img read more

4 die in California hostage standoff

first_imgLaw enforcement personnel are seen near a building after an active shooter turned hostage situation at the Veterans Home of California on 9 March 2018 in Yountville, California. AFPA gunman and three women thought to be his hostages were found dead Friday at a California veterans home after an hours-long standoff with police.The assailant struck at 10:20am (1820 GMT) at the Veterans Home of California-Yountville in the Napa Valley, the largest veterans’ home in the United States with around 1,000 former servicemen and women.“Shortly before 6:00pm this evening law enforcement personnel made entry into the room where we felt the hostages were being held by the suspect and unfortunately made the discovery of three deceased females and one deceased male suspect,” Captain Chris Childs of the California Highway Patrol told a news conference.“This is a tragic piece of news, one we were really hoping we wouldn’t have to come before the public to give.”The Napa County Sheriff’s Office had earlier issued an advisory on social media telling people to avoid the area following reports of gunfire, as the California Highway Patrol dispatched officers, air support and a SWAT team to the site.Childs said a sheriff’s deputy who was first on the scene exchanged fire with the suspect, adding that “we credit him with saving the lives of others in the area by eliminating the ability for the suspect to go out and find further victims.”The three victims were described by local media as employees of The Pathway Home, an on-site counselling service for veterans who suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).It was not immediately clear whether they had been targeted or were chosen at random.The San Francisco Chronicle said the gunman-apparently a 36-year-old war veteran wearing “a stash of bullets” around his neck and waist-had been on the PTSD treatment program, adding that his weapon was a rifle.Gunman was calmIt quoted state senator Bill Dodd identifying the program’s executive director, Christine Loeber, as being one of the dead, although the victims’ names have not been officially released.Police did not say how they died, although local media, citing unnamed sources, reported that the assailant shot the three women before turning the gun on himself.Dodd, whose district includes the centre, said the gunman had been asked to leave several days earlier, according to the Chronicle.“It’s a residential program so guys live in the building, staff work in the building,” Larry Kamer, whose wife Devereaux Smith was working at the centre, told the local ABC7 News channel.Smith, a development director for The Pathway Home, was one of four women released by the gunman, said Kamer.“There was a going away party for a couple of the staff who were leaving today. They were having cake and toasting and all that and then he apparently just walked in with this rifle.”Kamer said the gunman was calm and talked to everyone present.The discovery came after several fruitless hours of trying to contact the man by the sheriff’s department, City of Napa Police and the FBI.California Department of Veterans Affairs secretary Vito Imbasciani said in a statement the agency was “devastated” by the deaths.“Our hearts are heavy for the entire Yountville Veterans Home community and the families and friends who are grieving for those who died,” he added.“Nothing matters more than caring for our veterans and employees during this difficult time. We appreciate the tremendous law enforcement response today and unfailing support of this community.”last_img read more

Tribal war drove human evolution of aggression

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. “Once the probability 0.6 is fixed in the population, a value of 0.7 is more likely to invade than a decrease to 0.5. So it is true that there is gradual, step-by-step evolutionary process causing the increment in the tendency to go to war, but this might take a long time. Our model is a bit less idealized than this, but it works approximately like that.”However, as you might expect, there is a downside to belligerence and bravery. While both these traits offer advantages during war for a tribe, both traits are also considered high-risk social behaviors. An individual possessing the traits has a greater chance of dying, which means the tribe not only loses a warrior, but the death also opens a spot for another male to appropriate the first male’s reproduction-enhancing resources. This trade-off leads to another question: if an individual himself does not benefit from belligerence and bravery, but only his tribe, why would humans evolve this altruistic trait? The scientists explain that the answer is kinship: a human will take the risk of dying for close relatives since they carry very similar genetic material, and will pass that genetic material on for him. “The mathematical analysis in fact shows that the selective pressure on belligerence and bravery is substantially driven by the benefits of conquest that accrue on the relatives of the belligerent and/or brave males within their group, showing that kinship ties shape warfare in our model,” Lehmann said. “Evolutionary biologists refers to this as ‘indirect’ transmission of genes because the individual expressing the trait does not reproduce (it’s in fact costly for him), but other individuals from the group who survive may indirectly benefit from the behavior of the possibly dead brave male.”Lehmann added that the genetic relatedness concept stems from the late Bill Hamilton of Oxford University, one of the greatest evolutionary biologists of the 20th century. Prior to Hamilton, the British geneticist J. B. S Haldane also hit upon the idea in a famous anecdote. When asked by a friend at a pub whether he would risk his life to save a drowning man, Haldane scribbled some notes on a napkin and answered, “No, but I would do it for two brothers or eight cousins.” The same idea holds true for the altruistic traits of belligerence and bravery, but Lehmann and Feldman were surprised to find just how large a group could show the kinship connection.“[The greatest significance of this study is] showing that the selective pressure on belligerence and bravery may remain substantial even in groups of large size (approximately 50 males and 50 females),” Lehmann said. “This is interesting because it is usually assumed that individually costly, altruistic traits (of which belligerence and bravery are only particular examples) would only be able to evolve in very small-sized groups, like the nuclear family or something only slightly bigger. The demographics behind warfare may explain the evolution of altruism in larger groups than have usually been assumed in more standard biological scenarios aimed at understanding the evolution of altruism.”Among other interesting results of the model is the finding that bravery is even more highly desired than belligerence, since bravery has advantages when tribes are on both the offensive and defensive sides. On a different note, even though the model describes genetic inheritance, the scientists say that these traits could also be inherited culturally (through nurture rather than nature). Today’s modern wars between large states, as opposed to tribal wars, don’t follow the same model. Rather, one of the most common explanations is that modern wars are fought when the benefits outweigh the costs, in a fairly rational way. But do the results of this study, showing that we are all offspring of conquerors, suggest an underlying primitive explanation for why we fight “rational” modern wars? Though it may be an intriguing idea, Lehmann doesn’t think so.“I don’t think that our study helps in one way or another to understand war between states, but there are many interesting and relevant theories for understanding such wars that have been developed by economists and political scientists,” he said.More information: Lehmann, Laurent and Feldman, Marcus W. “War and the evolution of belligerence and bravery.” Proceedings of The Royal Society B. doi:10.1098/rspb.2008.0842.Copyright 2008 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Explore further Citation: Tribal war drove human evolution of aggression (2008, September 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-09-tribal-war-drove-human-evolution.html Imitation breeds war in new evolutionary theory These reproduction-enhancing resources prompted our ancestors to fight in order to pass down their family genes. With war as a driving force for survival, an interesting pattern occurred, according to a new study. People with certain warrior-like traits were more likely to engage in and win wars, and then passed their warrior genes down to their children, which – on an evolutionary timescale – made their tribe even more warrior-like. In short, humans seem to have become more aggressive over time due to war’s essential benefits.In their study, Stanford University scientists Laurent Lehmann and Marcus Feldman have presented a model showing that aggressive traits in males may have evolved as an adaptation to limited reproductive resources. Because tribal war serves as a method for appropriating territory and women, war may have driven the evolution of these traits. The scientists use the term “belligerence” to refer to a trait that increases the probability that the person’s tribe will attack another tribe. Likewise, “bravery” refers to a trait that increases the probability that the person’s tribe will win a war, whether they have attacked or are being attacked. Lehmann and Feldman demonstrate in their model that belligerence and bravery continue to genetically evolve through the male line. When one tribe conquers another, males in the conquering group mate with females in the conquered group, and pass the warrior traits to their male offspring.“Suppose that for some reason or another each individual in a population is committed through genetic or cultural influence to go to war with probability 0.5,” Lehmann told PhysOrg.com. “Now in one group, an individual appears that is willing to go to war with probability 0.6, which, statistically, will increase his group to go to war. The genes or cultural variants causing individuals to go to war with probability 0.6 may then invade the population (because their bearer and their group members will produce more offspring and send more genetic or cultural variants in the next generation than individuals expressing the probability 0.5 to go war, and on average they will transmit to their offspring the tendency 0.6 to go to war), but this will take several generations, especially if belligerence or bravery is genetically determined. Wars are costly in terms of lives and resources – so why have we fought them throughout human history? In modern times, states may fight wars for a number of complex reasons. But in the past, most tribal wars were fought for the most basic resources: goods, territory, and women.last_img read more