Conserving Water for Future Generations

first_imgWise Wayz Water Care (WWWC) programme is based on the South Coast of Durban- in the communities of Folweni and Ezimbokodweni. It is there where the desire grew from two community groups at grassroot level – to restore and manage the communities’ dwindling natural resources and build a sustainable project for future generations to come. The programme stemmed from humble efforts by the local citizens to empower themselves in order to mitigate the social, economic and environmental challenges that confronted them.As South Africa is a water stressed country and has been experiencing droughts and low water levels, this stimulated the community to protect the aquatic ecosystems, such as the wetlands,rivers and streams of Ezimbokodweni and Folweni.It was community members like Desmond Malgas, who is now a project coordinator, who went knocking for assistance and support from corporates and organisations, to endorse their project and indeed, the AECI Community Education and Development Trust jumped onboard. This is how the WWWC programme was born.Since its inception in 2016, the programme has been able to bring hope to the lives of the downtrodden communities of Folweni and Ezimbokodweni and has allowed them to think beyond their circumstances. Mr Malgas, alludes to how the project has personally helped him to develop and improve himself in terms of learning about governance, and the skills that he has acquired through the training he has received. He further extols that it has also allowed him “to grow, find full expression through uplifting his community and changing his mindset to see a better future”.Its three-tier model encompasses the different levels of donor, implementer and beneficiary. This project, funded by the AECI Community Education and Development Trust and implemented by i4WATER – has been able to build synergy between corporates and the community, by introducing interventions that develop sustainable livelihoods through impactful and practical measures. Some of the interventions include water conservation, food security, solid waste management, alien plant management, aquatic assessment and monitoring as well as Sinqonqozela Ulwazi (which aims to educate the community and create awareness around waste management).The Wise Wayz Water Care team with members of the AECI Community Education and Development Trust and Brand SA representatives at the interactive site visit.The programme has had a huge impact on the members who have also become beneficiaries of the project in several ways. It has been able to give the youth and elderly members a stepping stone to realising their future prospects through providing skills and knowledge on a basic, intermediate and advanced level. It has also trained and supported the commercial agriculture start-up of the project’s food security intervention by supporting community gardens. The food garden component has yielded a supply of vegetables for consumption by the community. The project recently won its first contract to get profits from their Invasive Alien Plant clearing start-up.Although they have faced several challenges, it is their vision to upscale the piloted model and continue successful sustainable change throughout the country. This keeps an implementer such as Ntswaki Ditlhale of i4WATER committed to the values and vision of the project.For more information on the Wise Wayz Water Care programme, click on the link below:You can also contact them on the following platforms:E-mail: kirsten@i4WATER.org or ntswaki@i4WATER.orgTwitter: @wwwczaFacebook: Wise Wayz Water CareWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

Many in Odisha denied PDS rice due to non-seeding of Aadhaar

first_imgThe ‘One Nation, One Ration Card’ scheme seems to be not working in favour of many in Odisha, according to a survey that found that hundreds of people have not been provided rice through the Public Distribution System for two months due to non-seeding of Aadhaar. The study also found that exclusion due to Aadhaar linking is more prevalent in tribal areas.A study of 63 villages in Nabarangpur district found that out of 1,271 people in 272 households surveyed, 435 have not been provided PDS rice for September and October due to non-seeding of Aadhaar. Out of these, 35% are children between 0-10 years of age.The survey was conducted during the first week of October by the Odisha chapter of the National Right to Food Campaign, an informal network of organisations and individuals working on right to food issues.PDS rice for two months was distributed in Kalahandi-Bolangir-Koraput area from September 20 to 30, according to Sameet Panda of the food campaign.Ineligible personsOut of 272 families, there were 17 households having a total of 50 members who have not received grain for September and October as none of the family members were seeded in PDS-Aadhaar.There are 255 such families where Aadhaar of one or more family members has not been seeded. There are 385 persons across these 255 households who have not been seeded into Aadhaar, so their names have been eliminated.The survey found that there are 17 persons who are ineligible. They include those dead; female members married outside; and not available in the village.Out of 435 persons whose Aadhaar has not been seeded, 185 persons don’t have Aadhaar. The survey team met those who have applied for Aadhaar several times but have not received it so far, said Mr. Panda.There are 228 persons who have an Aadhaar number but it has not been seeded yet. Out of them, 72 persons have submitted their Aadhaar in the gram panchayat but they don’t know why it has not been seeded. There are 17 such persons whose Aadhaar number is reflected in the PDS card but their name has been deleted.last_img read more

India vs Sri Lanka final: Mahela Jayawardene hits ton, helps Lankans score 274/6

first_imgMahela Jayawardene held the key for Sri Lanka after quick wickets pushed them on the backfoot as the visitors looked to put a good challenge before the hosts playing in the ICC World Cup finals at Mumbai’s Wankhede Stadium on Saturday.Mahela’s 103 not out (88 balls) gave the Sri Lankan middle order some stability which helped the team reach a decent total of 274 at the loss of 6 wickets in 50 overs.Batting at number four, Mahela stayed put holding the crease at one end even as other batsmen kept coming and returning to the pavilion. With his silken stroke play and calm presence at the crease, he scored all around the wicket hitting pacers and spinners with ease.Mahela and skipper K. Sangakkara were scoring freely until Yuvraj took the latter’s wicket in the 28th over as Lanka lost their third wicket at 122 runs. The visitors were in trouble when wickets fell in quick succession in the 39th (Samaraweera) and 40th overs (Kapugedera). After 40 overs, Sri Lanka were struggling at 183/5.last_img read more