Dragons v Connacht Preview – Cronin and Sidoli return, Lydiate out

first_img“It means he’s almost certainly out of the Connacht match now, and it’s our most important game of the season. They had him in there and though his neck wasn’t right they’ve messed around with it and made it worse when we distinctly said our players should not be tested this week.“Dan has gone down there with a couple of knocks [he’s also got shoulder and knee problems] but he’s been strength tested and come back unfit.“We have basically got shafted and it will have big implications because of Thursday’s match when we said we had to be looked after because we had a game earlier in the week than anyone else.“I’ve got e-mails which were sent about this and I’m fuming about it. Dan is probably our best player, yet Scarlets players went there on Monday and they weren’t tested.”A WRU spokesman denied the claims saying: “While both Dan and Toby were invited to the WRU national centre of excellence at the Vale of Glamorgan for the testing session, Dan was medically screened and declared unfit to take any part in the testing.“Toby completed one test from the five involved, but this was solely an anaerobic test lasting just 125 seconds which involved running for 450 metres.“There should be no suggestion that this test should in any way damage the preparations of a professional athlete so far out from his next match.“Fellow Dragons players Will Harries. Aled Brew and Luke Charteris were all also invited to the testing session and they each joined Dan in sitting out all of the tests.”DRAGONS TEAM FOR CONNACHT:W Harries, A Hughes, T Riley, A Smith, A Brew, J Tovey, J Evans; H Gustafson, T Willis (c), B Castle, A Jones, R Sidoli, L Evans, G Thomas, T Faletau.Replacements: S Jones, P Palmer, P Price, L Charteris, A Coombs, M Jones, M Petri, P Leach. Thursday 6 January – NEWPORT GWENT DRAGONS v CONNACHT, at Rodney Parade, 7.35pm.TV: Live on S4C RTE SportPut your predictions in the Comments Section below……Referee: Alan Lewis (IRFU, 37th League game)Newport Gwent Dragons’ only win in their last six matches in all competitions was 20-6 at home to Munster in the Magners League on 26 November. Dragons have won their last three games at Rodney Parade, whilst the last seven Irish sides to visit the venue have all lost.Connacht have lost their last eight encounters in all competitions since their 16-13 victory over Bayonne on 15 October. The Irishmen have won just once away from home in the Magners League since April 2008: 19-17 at Glasgow on 17 September 2010.The last five clashes between the two sides have all been won by the home team on the day. Connacht won 40-17 against Dragons in round one but have not achieved a season’s double over the Welshmen since 2007/08.Watch highlights of the Dragons v the Scarlets here The Connacht squad sees a number of positional changes and two personnel changes. Sean Cronin, back from an IRFU imposed break (under the Player Welfare Management Programme), replaces Adrian Flavin at hooker in the starting lineup. Mike McComish has recovered from the illness that ruled him out of last weekend’s clash against Leinster and he replaces Shane Conneely on the bench.The rest of the pack remains unchanged with Academy star Eoin McKeon retaining his place at number 8 following an impressive display last weekend. The reshuffled backine sees the adaptable Ian Keatley move to fullback with former New Zealand Youths Troy Nathan, who qualifies for Ireland through residency, shift to the wing. Nathan has 64 caps for Connacht and has shown his versatility having played in every position in the backline for the Province. Academy graduate Eoin Griffin moves to outside centre and he is joined on the wing by Fionn Carr, with Brian Tuohy providing cover from the bench.15 Ian Keatley LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: ConnachtNewport Gwent Dragons center_img Connacht team news: Dragons team newsThere are a handful of chances from the side which faced the Scarlets last weekend. Jonathan Evans comes in at scrum half, whilst new signing Mike Petri is on the bench. Locks Rob Sidoli and Adam Jones both return to the starting line up, whilst Lewis Evans also starts at flanker.The front row trio of Hugh Gustafson, Ben Castle and captain Tom Willis all start, whilst Gavin Thomas and Toby Faletau retain their places. Luke Charteris drops to the bench where he is joined by the returning Andrew Coombs. Steve Jones, Pat Palmer and Phil Price provide the front row cover.In the backs Will Harries continues at full back, Adam Hughes and Aled Brew fill the wing berths, and Tom Riley partners Ashley Smith in the centre. Jason Tovey is the outside half, with Pat Leach and Mathew Jones among the replacements.The Men of Gwent last faced Connacht in the opening fixture of this season, when they were soundly beaten 40-17 in Galway, but they have a strong home record against the Irish province, having won six of the previous seven encounters between the two sides played at Rodney Parade, most recently winning 23-10 in October 2009.Dan Lyidate misses out after picking up an injury at Wales fitness testing, angering Coach Paul Turner.“It’s a disgrace, especially as we’re a region with not great resources,” Turner told the South Wales Argus. “Our two players have been tested and one of them has got injured, Dan has come in with a neck injury, he can’t move it. 14 Troy Nathan13 Eoin Griffin12 Keith Matthews11 Fionn Carr10 Miah Nikora09 Cillian Willis01 Brett Wilkinson02 Sean Cronin03 Jamie Hagan04 Michael Swift05 Michael McCarthy06 Andrew Browne07 Johnny O’Connor08 Eoin McKeon16 Adrian Flavin17 Rodney Ah You18 Dylan Rogers19 Bernie Upton20 Mike McComish21 Frank Murphy22 Niva Ta’auso23 Brian Tuohylast_img read more

RBS 6 Nations: Inside the England Camp Part Four

first_imgRun boys run: England players train in the sunshine ahead of the Italy matchMIKE BROWN and David Strettle give each other plenty of stick in our latest behind-the-scenes video from the England training base while Dan Cole and Billy Twelvetrees look at lessons learnt from the France game and the squad try their hands at cooking… LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img

Best Rugby Boots for Forwards 2021

first_imgBuy Now from Lovell for £128Buy Now from Amazon from £81.31MORE RUGBY BOOTS BUYERS’ GUIDES Expand LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Best Rugby Boots for Flankers 2021 Collapse Best Rugby Boots for Props 2021 Best Rugby Boots for Wide Feet 2021 A buyers’ guide for the best boots for… Canterbury Speed 3.0 Pro SG Boots(Canterbury)Just because you play in the forwards doesn’t mean you have to wear a typical ‘forward’s’ boot. If you are playing in the back row it is likely that you want something that compliments your ball-carrying, even if that comes at the expense of some protection.The Speed 3.0 offers a bootie-like fit which provides extreme comfort and reduced weight. Unlike other bootie-style shoes that offer nothing in the way of protection, the Speed 3.0 comes with a harder outer skin to give foot protection. The mix of moulded and metal studs gives these boots more year-round usage than you get from the eight-stud options.+ A speedy option for the fleet-footed forwards+ The stud arrangement means that, barring any extreme weather, you can wear these all year round– Ideal for back-rowers, these might be a little sparse on protection for the tight fiveBuy Now from Canterbury for £79.95Buy Now from ProDirectRugby for £80Buy Now from Lovell Rugby for £70Adidas Kakari Elite SG Boots(Adidas)Some things can be found in all rugby clubs anywhere in the world. The first is at least one Welsh person and the second is a host of players wearing these boots.The Kakari Elite is a boot for forwards that shuns the perceived wisdom that forwards only want to wear black boots. The upper provides protection from a misplaced size 12 but these are still lightweight. An integrated cage system straps the foot firmly in meaning you can dance past the last man once you make the break.+ A stylish boot that is still somehow understated despite the orange and blue colour scheme+ Achieves the balance of being comfortable and protected while also keeps the foot strapped in place– Not a year-round boot, you will find them much less comfortable during pre-season training on a sun-parched trackBuy Now from Lovell Rugby for £60Buy Now from Sports Direct for £34.50Buy Now from ProDirectRugby for £40Gilbert Side Logo Boots(Gilbert)It might not seem like it, but you don’t need to spend a fortune to get a really good pair of boots. In the Side Logo, Gilbert deliver the ideal boot for a forward, all for under £40.The laces and padded ankle collar ensure your foot remains locked in, even on the worst of pitches. The collar also gives your ankle bones protection from stray feet. The studs provide maximum traction even under intense scrum pressure. There are no fancy additions, but for most of us, the Side Logo offers everything we need.+ Plenty of traction on even the worst of pitches+ Amazingly good value for this quality of boot construction– Black and neon green is a combination which takes a bit of time to get used tooBuy Now from Lovell Rugby for £37Buy Now from Sports Direct for £37Canterbury Stampede Pro SG Boots(Canterbury)A boot for the tight five who appreciate mod-cons. The Stampede Pro looks more like the kind of speedy backs boot we’ve covered. The bootie-style fit offers comfort and sweat-wicking properties as well as trimming some weight off the boot.The reduced weight is incidental, though, as this is designed for members of the tight five. The leather forefront and PU upper provide durability and abrasion resistance to last for season after season. The boots also have shock absorbing properties, which mean that whether you’re jumping in lineouts or packing down in the scrum, it will take that bit longer for your legs to fatigue.+ Extremely attractive boot which looks classy without drawing attention to itself+ Packed with innovation and technology but without a massive price tag– The bootie fit may take some time to get used too if you haven’t experienced it beforeBuy Now from Lovell Rugby for £70Buy Now from Sports Direct for £69.99Buy Now from ProDirectRugby for £80That is a wrap on our best rugby boots for forwards in 2020. Best Rugby Boots for Props 2021center_img A buyers’ guide featuring the best boots for… Expand Best Rugby Boots for Wide Feet 2021 A buyers’ guide featuring the best boots for… A buyers’ guide featuring boots for ball-carrying back-rowers and powerful props Best Rugby Boots for Forwards 2021It used to be the case that a forward’s rugby boots were black, pretty ugly and very heavy. Most clubs will still have a handful of grizzled old timers who haven’t changed their mind on that, but it needn’t be the case for the rest of us. New materials and manufacturing methods have given us modern rugby boots that are both light and protected enough for even the roughest of ruck bottoms.In addition to featuring the best of both worlds, the best rugby boots for forwards have become much more appealing. If you can’t face the prospect of trading in your black boots for something garish, then you are in luck. There are plenty of all-black options or, if you’re feeling brave, something understated with a splash of colour. Upgrade into 2020 with our guide to the best rugby boots for forwards.If you play behind the scrum, read our guide to the best boots for backs in 2020.Best Rugby Boots for ForwardsPuma King Pro H8 Boots(Puma)A classy, stylish option for any forward. The King Pro offers an all-black option that will look brand new season after season. The eight-stud sole offers excellent traction, even when the pitch has turned to mush.The slip-on construction provides a tight fit, reduced weight, all without scrimping on comfort. The raised heel puts your foot in the perfect position to generate power, whether that is in a scrum or charging through defenders in the open field.+ Great value boot given the high-tech features you would normally get at a much higher price range+ The leather upper provides protection in even the roughest contests– Some would call the styling classy, otherwise would say it’s a little boringBuy Now from Puma for £44.95Buy Now from Lovell Rugby for £65Buy Now from Amazon from £44.95Adidas Kakari Z.0 SG Boots(Adidas)The Kakari Z.0 is classy and understated enough for even the most traditional of forwards. The bootie style fit is exceptionally comfortable but an inner support strap ensures that comfort doesn’t come at the expense of performance.The split sole is ideal for the grunt work of the tight five. You can stay low and planted in the turf and still generate power thanks to the sole flexibility.+ A boot for forwards that doesn’t come at the expense of speed+ Slipper like comfort means it doesn’t feel like you’re wearing a high-performance boot– At £170 this really is at the top end of boot pricesBuy Now from Sports Direct for £169.99Buy Now from Lovell Rugby for £170Buy Now from ProDirectRugby for £169.95Gilbert Kaizen 3.0 Power SG Boots(Gilbert)The perfect boot for a mid-winter game. The eight metal studs provided a firm grip in even the most marshy of pitches while the synthetic uppers limit water absorption. The padded ankle cuff provides some protection to your delicate ankle bones and ensures comfort and optimal fit.These aren’t just for slow-moving forwards though; a heel raise puts the player into their most powerful position, vital for ball-carrying back-rowers who want to escape a chasing defender.+ A rigid sole and secure inner allow you to exert all your power without fear of losing your grip+ Provides durability and foot protection without compromising on agility thanks to its lightweight design– For all but the most traditional the design may be a little safeBuy Now from Amazon from £39.07Buy Now from Lovell Rugby for £60Buy Now from Sports Direct for £60Mizuno Morelia Neo II Mix SG Boots(Mizuno)Something a little different from the Japanese manufacturer. Eight-stud boots are great when the pitch is bad but on dry pitches you might find that they offer less grip than a moulded stud. The Morelia Neo II Mix bridges the gap with the combination of metal studs and plastic moulds. These will offer more than enough traction in all but the most horrendous of conditions.The rest of the boot has plenty to recommend it as well. The external heel and full-lace system hold the foot securely in place and prevent movement when jumping in a lineout or flashing your footwork in the open field. As you would expect at this price point, the boots are lightweight with enough protection for forwards operating in the murky places where backs fear to tread.+ A good combination of stud which should serve you well all season+ Very lightweight, they won’t hide your rapid turn of pace– Nearing the highest priced boot we have mentioned in our guides Best Rugby Boots for Flankers 2021 Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Please follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Game over: Bonnie Ball closes out inaugural one-game season

first_imgGame over: Bonnie Ball closes out inaugural one-game season Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 July 13, 2012 at 12:04 am Hey! Thanks for the anti-props for my cassock! It helped fuel the friendly abuse from my deputation! What fun it was to follow, and we all listened more closely. [Episcopal News Service – Indianapolis] In a come-from-behind victory, the Rev. Lowell Grisham, deputy from Arkansas, will go down in the record books as having trounced all competition to win the only game in the first season of Bonnie Ball.A large number of the deputies in the 800-plus-member house, and some staffers, scored points during the eight-inning game — one inning per day of convention. The umpire scored the plays, whose point values were based on players using buzzwords during deputies’ debate or engaging in certain activities while the house was in session. There were 28 possible ways to earn points.Grisham beat out the Rev. Canon Gregory Straub, the Episcopal Church’s executive officer and secretary of the General Convention, in the final inning. Straub had been leading for most of the game. At the stroke of final gavel, Grisham had scored 71 points to Straub’s 60.Outgoing House of Deputies President Bonnie Anderson, after whom the game was named, placed ninth in the final standings with 24 points.The player who was listed in the standings as “The Spanish Translator who yelled into Deputy Salazar’s earphones” rounded out the top 10 with 20 points.The identity of the game’s umpire and the umpire’s helper had been known only to their bishop, a technical assistant back home and, as of 7 a.m. July 12, an ENS reporter to whom they offered an exclusive interview to be released after the end of the game.The umpire was incarnated in two people: the Rev. Canon Mark Stevenson, canon to the ordinary in the Diocese of Louisiana and a deputy, and the Rev. Chad Jones, another Louisiana deputy. The umpire’s helper was Kenn Elder, diocesan communication’s director, who updated scoring on the website from back home in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, based on decisions Stevenson sent him four or five times a day.The idea for the game germinated during a lunch Stevenson and Jones had a few months ago.“We’d been talking about what had happened at the last few conventions; how we’d seen people doing crazy things … people going to the microphone with headgear on,” Stevenson said.They asked Elder on June 28, just a few days before the July 5-12 convention began, to help them create a digital way to keep track of plays, scoring and standings. It was meant to be some “good, clean fun” among a few deputies and their friends, according to the umpire.During the course of the game, the umpire took the moniker of the Rt. Rev. William White, first bishop of Pennsylvania from Feb. 4, 1787, until his death July 17, 1836. White e-mailed about 11 others on July 8, the halfway point of convention, inviting them to view the action online.By the next afternoon, the umpire heard deputies and others talking about the game in the House of Deputies. During Straub’s traditional announcement time at the end of the day’s sessions or perhaps the next day (real times seems to morph during convention), he read a note from Massachusetts Deputy Samuel Gould about Bonnie Ball, which required Straub to announce that he was the frontrunner. Gould finished the game a distant second to Straub.“The next thing we knew, in our tiny little sphere of the Episcopal Church, it was viral,” said Jones.Anderson released the deputies from the July 11 afternoon session wearing a funny hat and added that she hoped she had just scored points in Bonnie Ball.As the newest virus began to spread through convention (earlier in the convention there were outbreaks of upper respiratory and stomach bugs), Jones suggested that “if people are going to be going [to the website], we need to do something special.”The Bonnie Ball website urged players and fans to make a donation to Episcopal Relief & Development’s NetsforLife® Inspiration Fund.Stevenson is on the Episcopal Relief & Development board of directors and Jones suggested adding the fund’s logo to the Bonnie Ball website with the suggestion that people donate in name of the game.“That was one of the best things we did,” Stevenson said. “This started out as something just for us to have a little fun with and then when people started catching on, we said if people are going to go there, we need to make it matter.”The umpire said scoring the game has not been a distraction from deputy responsibilities. “This is the third convention I have attended and I have paid more attention to this convention, I have paid attention to what everybody’s said,” Stevenson said, due to the need to keep track for scoring purposes.“The truth of the matter is we can quote back to you large chunks of debate because we’ve been playing such close attention,” Jones said.He periodically e-mailed a list of scoring plays back home to Elder, who updated the website. There were no live updates to the site “because we’re deputies for the Diocese of Louisiana and that’s our primary role,” the umpire said.Despite the fact that the House of Deputies is equipped with two huge televisions screens, the game does not provide for instant replays. “But the only rules [in the game] are decided by us,” Stevenson said, “and we can change whatever we want to change.”“It’s completely arbitrary,” Jones agreed.Not even the umpire’s fellow deputies knew their secret identity. In fact, Stevenson’s seatmate at the deputation table marveled at the meticulous notes Stevenson took during debate, and urged him to lighten up.“Every time a person gets up to speak, I write their name down because you never know if they’re going to commit a play,” Stevenson explained to ENS during the seventh-inning stretch between the July 11 play and the final inning on July 12.“We’re so glad that this has been taken in the spirit in which this was meant,” said Stevenson. “We were committed to stay out of the political. It was not a political engine; it wasn’t to be mean-spirited. It’s just good, clean fun” that was devised as a way “to blow off steam” that sometimes accumulates during General Convention.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Tags Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs General Convention 2012, Comments are closed. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Press Release Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Events Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Meredith Gould, PhD says: July 14, 2012 at 10:02 pm Totally delightful and, no joke, a powerful form of evangelism! Gotta love a church polity that knows how to have fun at its own expense. Rector Albany, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Comments (4) Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Bath, NC House of Deputies Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA center_img Nurya Parish says: By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jul 12, 2012 Joseph Lane says: Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 General Convention, Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Martinsville, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Collierville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York July 12, 2012 at 9:30 pm Now I’m really sorry I got rid of my hog hat years ago. Greg Brown says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET July 12, 2012 at 8:34 pm I loved Bonnie Ball! Thank you for your imaginative and creative contribution to Convention. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listinglast_img read more

New bishop in Southern Malawi will succeed Tengatenga

first_img Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL New bishop in Southern Malawi will succeed Tengatenga Africa, People Submit a Job Listing Submit an Event Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Collierville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Jobs & Calls In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Anglican Communion, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem center_img Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Rector Albany, NY Press Release Service Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC By Bellah Zulu Posted Aug 27, 2013 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT [Anglican Communion News Service] A new bishop has been elected by the Diocese of Southern Malawi to replace outgoing Bishop James Tengatenga who resigned after 15 years of service to the diocese.The Rev. Canon Alinafe Kalemba, priest in charge of Chirimba Parish, was elected as bishop on Aug. 24, at St Paul’s Cathedral in Blantyre, Malawi.Tengatenga left the diocese to become dean of Dartmouth University’s Tucker Foundation in New Hampshire, but the appointment was later withdrawn because, the university said, his past comments about homosexuality “have compromised his ability to serve effectively.” Tengatenga said he will take legal action against the school but that he would not withdraw his resignation from South Malawi.In a statement, the acting provincial secretary of the Church of the Province of Central Africa, the Rt. Rev. William Mchombo said he was impressed with the “calm manner in which the elective assembly went about electing a bishop.”In a media interview, the bishop-elect said that he was “humbled to be entrusted with such a challenging responsibility” and was “ready to serve in that capacity.”Bishop Brighton Malasa, chairman of the Anglican Council in Malawi and Upper Shire, told the media that he was happy that the people had spoken through their votes.“He has been duly elected by the church faithful and I wish him well,” he said. “I am ready to work with him and offer my unreserved support to him.Kalemba, 46, is married with two children. He was ordained to priesthood in July 1994 and has a Master of Arts (Theological Research) degree from Durham University, UK and a Bachelor of Art (Theology) degree certificate from the University of Malawi.Besides working as a parish priest and training chaplain from the time of his ordination, Kalemba has also been involved in the formation of candidates for ordination training as lecturer and dean and later as principal of Leonard Kamungu Theological College in Malawi.— Episcopal News Service contributed to this report. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Events Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Tags Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Smithfield, NClast_img read more

Gail Greenwell named dean of Christ Church Cathedral in Cincinnati

first_imgGail Greenwell named dean of Christ Church Cathedral in Cincinnati Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY william hamel says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Martinsville, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Nancy Barnard Starr says: November 8, 2013 at 11:21 am She also serves as one of twelve members of The Task Force on the Study of Marriage Submit an Event Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Posted Oct 17, 2013 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Albany, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Tags Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME People TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Tampa, FL [Christ Church Cathedral, Cincinnati] As of November 1, the Rev. Gail Greenwell will be the new dean of Christ Church Cathedral in Cincinnati, Ohio. She sees Christ Church Cathedral poised to live out the hope and optimism she finds throughout the Episcopal Church, and she is ready to lead the cathedral forward.She sees within the cathedral “ … a congregation that seeks many of the things about which I care deeply. I discern a congregation that wants to know what it means to be an urban cathedral in the 21st century,” she says.Greenwell will be coming to Cincinnati from Saint Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church in Mission, Kansas (a suburb of Kansas City), where she has served as rector for the past five years. Previously she served the Church of the Epiphany in San Carolos, California, and St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in Belvedere, California. She also served as the interim director of Christian Formation at Christ Church in Lake Oswego, Oregon.Her other experience includes authorship of a curriculum in preparation for baptism, and establishing a spirituality and arts camp for low-income and inner city children. She also serves as one of twelve members of The Task Force on the Study of Marriage, which is expected to give a report to the General Convention of the Episcopal Church in 2015.Greenwell earned her Master of Divinity degree at the Church Divinity School of the Pacific. She also holds a bachelor degree in history and education from the University of Oregon.She cites being a meaningful part of people’s lives as the most gratifying part of her ministry.“It’s satisfying to form so many deep Christian friendships,” she says. “Then there are the sacramental moments. To sing for the dying. To hold an infant over the baptismal font. To place the Bread of Life in someone’s hands. These are satisfying beyond words.”Greenwell is known to work with clergy, staff and members as trusted partners.“She is capable of leading productive discussions, providing decisive responses and asking insightful questions,” says Chris Carey, who chaired the search effort.“Her approach fits in with the ‘shared responsibility’ model under which the cathedral has been operating in recent months,” says Chuck Harris, the cathedral’s senior warden.“I am known as a leader who identifies ministry gifts and empowers others to lead and serve,” she says.The 2008 recipient of the Pastoral Leadership Award from the Louisville Institute, Greenwell says she is honored to have been called to serve at Christ Church Cathedral. She will be officially installed next year.Greenwell and her husband, Jim, have two grown daughters – Megan, 29, is a journalist for ESPN in Connecticut; Emily, 26, works in pharmaceutical publishing in Boston. Submit a Job Listingcenter_img Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Bath, NC Rector Smithfield, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Events New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Press Release Service Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Collierville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Comments (2) The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group October 17, 2013 at 9:59 pm Nice to hear this news! Blessings to Gail and her family as they settle in Cincinnati, a lovely town, and crisscross our path and friendships there (Church of the Redeemer, Hyde Park).Nancy+ CDSP’94 Comments are closed. Rector Shreveport, LAlast_img read more

La Obispa Presidente sobre el plan de inmigración del Presidente

first_img Comments (1) Posted Nov 21, 2014 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Faith & Politics, Director of Music Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Refugees Migration & Resettlement Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Knoxville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Collierville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Comments are closed. Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Events Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ [21 de noviembre de 2014] La Obispa Presidente de la Iglesia Episcopal  Katharine Jefferts Schori ha emitido la siguiente declaración sobre las políticas de inmigración recientemente anunciadas por el presidente Obama:Junto con las familias y las comunidades de Estados Unidos, doy gracias por el anuncio del presidente Obama de que casi cinco millones de inmigrantes indocumentados pronto serán elegibles para el alivio de la amenaza de la deportación. Demasiadas familias han vivido durante mucho tiempo continuamente preocupadas porque los padres son separados de los hijos, los asalariados y los cuidadores de los que dependen de ellos, e incapaces de participar plenamente en sus comunidades y en la economía de la nación. Una reforma permanente e integral de nuestro quebrado sistema de inmigración mediante la acción del Congreso es todavía una necesidad urgente, pero la acción del Presidente es un paso constructivo hacia un sistema que honra la dignidad y el valor intrínseco de cada ser humano. Fortalecerá inmediatamente a las comunidades de nuestra nación al permitir que las familias de inmigrantes participen mucho más plenamente en la vida cívica y económica de Estados Unidos.La Iglesia Episcopal trabajará con los líderes del Congreso y de la Casa Blanca para presionar en favor de la aplicación del plan del presidente lo más rápida, justa e inclusivamente que sea posible. El plan del Presidente no es perfecto. Algunas personas y familias que lo merecen son excluidas, lo que significa que queda trabajo adicional por delante. Todas las personas merecen por igual la capacidad de perseguir sus sueños y contribuir en sus comunidades y familias con libertad y dignidad. Rezo para que la decisión del Presidente conduzca a nuestra nación hacia un futuro en el que esas sagradas posibilidades están abiertas a todos. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Immigration, Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group La Obispa Presidente sobre el plan de inmigración del Presidente Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release Submit an Event Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Press Release Service Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Bath, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Martinsville, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Tags New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME clovis erly rodrigues says: Rector Albany, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI November 29, 2014 at 3:02 pm Nuestra solidariedad a tantos migrantes que viven tiempos de angustia y incertidumbre.Sabias palavras de la obispa primada .Que toda la Iglesia en EUA se haga oir fuertemente. +Clovis, emérito Brasil Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 last_img read more

Wisdom Year begins at Newark Shared Ministries

first_img Rector Albany, NY By Emily WachnerPosted Oct 20, 2015 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Youth Minister Lorton, VA Wisdom Year begins at Newark Shared Ministries Press Release Service Rector Bath, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Press Release Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Rector Shreveport, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Collierville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY [General Theological Seminary] Two M.Div. seniors from The General Theological Seminary, Tommie Watkins, Jr., and Nancy Hennessey, began their Wisdom Year internships this semester at Newark Shared Ministries. A collaboration between St. Paul’s Chatham, Christ Church Short Hills, The Apostles’ House, Inc., and House of Prayer in Newark, the effort to share ministry began more than 18 months ago with the support of the Rt. Rev. Mark Beckwith, Bishop of Newark. The rectors and wardens of each of the three parishes, along with the Executive Director of The Apostles’ House, began to meet with diocesan staff on a monthly basis to explore collaborative possibilities, including shared preaching and mutual ministry.The Very Rev. Kurt H. Dunkle, Dean and President of General Seminary, was invited to participate in the monthly meetings, and it became clear that a Wisdom Year residency could be a natural fit. “Often seminaries talk about investment, as if it were a one-way street—you invest in us,” Dunkle reflects. “At General, however, in The Wisdom Year, investment is a two-way street. We are learning from Newark about this new way of doing ministry, and we expect that Tommie and Nancy will contribute to its flourishing.”The shared ministry environment is an ideal setting for Wisdom Year residents to learn, grow, and contribute. Watkins has a Ph.D. in Public Health from the University of Alabama, in addition to a master’s degree in Social Work, having spent more than a decade doing HIV prevention and counseling in Miami, Florida, and Birmingham, Alabama. His goal over the next year is to strengthen ties between the Rutgers University School of Medicine, House of Prayer, and the Apostles’ House. House of Prayer has a strong history of community health ministries, and the nearby Apostles’ House has an emergency family shelter and social services agency which was established by six Episcopal parishes—including Christ Church and House of Prayer—in the early 1980s.Hennessey comes to Newark Shared Ministries with a 12-year background in higher education administration, including seven years as the Director of the Career Center and Office of Service Learning at Hood College in Frederick, Maryland. She will focus on supporting the effort to establish a high-school equivalency program at House of Prayer, working with St. Paul’s parishioners to write grants, helping to establish program goals, and hiring a program manager.Watkins and Hennessey will alternate Sundays between Christ Church and House of Prayer, preaching once a month in each location and helping to expand and support ministries for children and youth in both parishes. The Rev. Dr. Timothy Mulder, Rector of Christ Church, will supervise the Wisdom Year residents, with assistance from a lay committee at House of Prayer and Newark’s diocesan staff. Each resident will work 20 hours per week, and will be paid $25,000 for the year. “To be compensated means that we are being valued, though we are also still learning,” reflected Watkins. “To be able to make mistakes with a mentor like Tim Mulder is compelling.”“Initially, I had no intention of doing something like this,” said Hennessey. “I came from a more affluent, suburban church background. But The Wisdom Year has really pushed me out of my comfort zone, to experience the full diversity of our church. This shared partnership is the new way of doing ministry.” Director of Music Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Belleville, ILlast_img read more

Glitter Ash Wednesday takes ritual, adds glitter, mixes in meaning,…

first_img Rector Tampa, FL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT P K Alford says: Paul Barthelemy says: Submit a Job Listing March 1, 2017 at 1:30 am Did ashes need an “opportunity to convey additional meaning”? No matter what the reason or cause may be, I, for one, do not think so. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Wm. Van Ness says: Carla Haughton says: February 28, 2017 at 6:10 pm I agree with Dr Meyers that the mixing of glitter with the ashes is a confusion of symbols and a misunderstanding of the visibility of ashes. That the visibility of ashes on one’s forehead identifies one as a Christian is a secondary effect. The primary purpose is to acknowledge our complicity in all that obstructs the dignity of creation and of human beings and our commitment to ‘repent and return to the Lord’. Wearing ashes, unadorned and stark, can be a sign of our own repentance from any actions that deny the full humanity of our LGBTQ sisters and brothers.We sometimes try to overload symbols and, in the process, dilute their ability to catch our attention. David Rodgers says: February 28, 2017 at 6:51 pm Let’s sacramentalize sin. Rebecca K Smith says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET March 1, 2017 at 4:23 pm Oh my goodness that is so well said, even though I am a firm believer in not adding or subtracting anything from scripture. I do concur that by adding glitter you may as well dress in Rags and place a gold necklace about your neck so that others may see that you are basically being a pharisee…oh see what I have done this day. March 1, 2017 at 10:23 am This is a silly idea lacking any theological or spiritual integrity. I am a gay man who is a priest and, quite frankly, consider it an insult. Please save us from the “creativity” that others feel called to exercise around the liturgy. What about probing more deeply into what our given symbols mean? Read the Gospel for Ash Wednesday, for pity sakes! Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem February 28, 2017 at 9:04 pm So we are to ask for glitter ashes if we support our LGBT brothers, sisters, or others. OK, if offered, I will take on the glitter ashes. Now, I wonder how many LGBT folks will take on plain ashes in support of their straight brothers and sisters? March 1, 2017 at 8:26 am PK Alford – thank you for that. I was wallowing in the tradition and you have refocused me on Christ’s words. This debate is a distraction – eyes back on the cross, y’all! James M. Bimbi says: Karen D Powers says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI March 1, 2017 at 2:29 pm Another worthless, hollow theological gimmick compliments of the progressive left clergy of this Church. When even LGBT members think this is a dumb idea that should tell you something. Will the foolishness never end? Glitter ashes for Glitter+Ash Wednesday have a distinctly different look than traditional ashes used to remind people about their mortality on the first day of Lent. Photo: Glitter+Ash Wednesday via Facebook[Episcopal News Service] Ashes on the forehead are arguably the most conspicuous mark of a Christian during the year. Signifying mortality and repentance, they are a visible sign to the world on Ash Wednesday that a believer is preparing for the season of Lent.It is the conspicuousness of the ashes that the Rev. Elizabeth Edman, an Episcopal priest in the New York City area, saw as an opportunity to convey additional meaning. This Ash Wednesday, with the help of an ecumenical faith-based LGBT advocacy group called Parity, she is starting what she hopes will become an annual tradition for Christians who support gay, lesbian and transgender rights.Introducing Glitter Ash Wednesday.The concept behind Glitter Ash Wednesday is exactly as it sounds. Parity has been distributing ashes mixed with purple glitter for free to any clergy member or lay person who requests them for use this Ash Wednesday, March 1. As of last weekend, at least 139 orders had been shipped, Edman said, including to several Episcopal priests around the country.“I didn’t want to do something that could be interpreted as frivolous and disrespectful,” Edman said, though she understands not everyone will embrace the idea.Wearing glitter is about more than celebration for the gay community, Edman said. Like ashes for Christians, it is a conspicuous symbol of one’s identity, and she sees that as an appropriate parallel to draw on Ash Wednesday.“It’s not just about inclusion and tolerance. It’s about more than that,” Edman said. “It’s about upending power structures that do violence to people, and particularly that do spiritual violence to people.”The Rev. Joseph Wood, assistant rector at Emmanuel Episcopal Church, is among the clergy participating in Glitter Ash Wednesday, which has its own Facebook page and is generating headlines around the country.“I’ll be very curious what the response will be tomorrow when people are faced with the reality of glitter ashes,” Wood said in an interview Feb. 28.He ordered glitter ashes from Parity because he thought it was “a clever idea” that built upon the “ashes to go” ministries that are common on Ash Wednesday. By imposing ashes on street corners, congregations can connect with people where they are, including people who never set foot in a church, he said, and he is bringing the same spirit to glitter ashes.And although the Episcopal Church has made strides toward welcoming people regardless of sexual orientation, Wood said, “I think it can be easy to kid of rest on our laurels” in the push for “queer equality.”Wood will offer regular ashes or glitter ashes at the noon and 5:30 p.m. Ash Wednesday services at Emmanuel. The Rev. Karen Coleman plans to do the same at St. James Episcopal Church in Sommerville, Massachusetts, where the congregation holds “ash and dash” hours from 3 to 6:30 p.m.“We’ve always been a parish that that’s been open and affirming” of gay and lesbian Christians, Coleman said.Whether worshipers choose traditional ashes or glitter ashes, they won’t have to dash afterward. The church offers a meditation station and encourages people to stay, pray and reflect on the beginning of Lent.Parity’s website further highlights some of the symbolism that organizers have in mind. Glitter “is like love” as well as “a sign of hope” and a “promise to repent, to show up, to witness, to work. Glitter never gives up – and neither do we.”The website also notes how glitter has been “an inextricable element of queer history,” particularly because it makes the wearer conspicuous.Parity offered the ash-glitter mix for free, or for a suggested donation of $10, and the website notes that the glitter ashes have sold out. People looking to receive glitter ashes can check the site’s map of locations. They’re then encouraged to post to social media using the hashtag #GlitterAshWednesday.The site also emphasizes the religious significance of participation: “Glitter+Ash is an inherently queer sign of Christian belief, blending symbols of mortality and hope, of penance and celebration.”But that blending of symbols may become spiritually “problematic” and “confusing,” said the Rev. Ruth Meyers, dean of academic affaris and professor of liturgics at Church Divinity School of the Pacific in Berkeley, California. She would advise clergy against incorporating glitter into their Ash Wednesday rituals.“It’s an ancient symbol of repentance, of regret … our mortality,” Meyers said. “To try to combine that symbol with glitter, which seems to be about a celebration and an affirmation of a particular group of people, seems to confuse the symbols in a way that doesn’t allow either symbol to work.”The Book of Common Prayer only specifies that ashes should be imposed, without elaborating on the method or mixture, Meyers said. Traditionally the ashes come from the burnt palm fronds from the previous Easter, but even that aspect of Ash Wednesday is merely a custom for Episcopalians.“People have to make their own well-informed decisions how to do that,” Meyers said. “There isn’t a rule that says, ‘Thou shall use only this for the ashes.’”Even so, she suggested that people interested in showing solidarity with LGBT causes can take that on as a Lenten discipline without changing the traditional symbolism of the ashes.For most people, this Ash Wednesday will go on like any other. There does not seem to be widespread adoption of glitter ash in its first year, and participating Episcopal clergy members appear to be offering it in addition to traditional ashes, leaving it up to worshipers whether to add glitter to their observance.The Rev. Amy Chambers Cortright learned about Glitter Ash Wednesday from posts on Facebook.“It really caught my attention, and I wanted to learn more, said Cortright, the priest-in-charge at St. John’s Episcopal Church-Tower Grove in St. Louis, Missouri. “I wish I’d thought of it before.”Glitter is a substance that clings to you no matter what you do, Cortright said, like “hope that will not fade.”She ordered the glitter ash and will impose it, as well as traditional ashes, at the church and at an “ashes to go” site on a street corner nearby.Although most people she has talked to have been supportive, Cortright said she has heard some snarky comments questioning the use of glitter ash.“I would really ask colleagues to pause and think about what a profound statement it is to our LGBTQ family and reconsider,” she said.Wood sees in Glitter Ash Wednesday a symbol of solidarity in both the ashes and the glitter.“We’re all being united in recognition of the bounds of our faith,” he said.Edman, who also is author of the book “Queer Virtue: What LGBTQ People Know About Life and Love and How It Can Revitalize Christianity,” said she too has heard people express concern that Glitter Ash Wednesday sets the wrong tone. The use of glitter in this context doesn’t convey joy, she said, “it is serious business for us.”It shows courage in maintaining a deep sense of identity in an often hostile world, she said, and “in the same way, I’m hoping glitter can be a public witness to a very deep faith.”On Ash Wednesday, she plans to join with the Rev. Marian Edmonds-Allen, Parity’s executive director, and distribute glitter ashes in Manhattan at Stonewall National Monument, site of the 1969 Stonewall riots, which galvanized the early gay rights movement.Meyers, despite her reservations about glitter ash, supports the Episcopal Church’s efforts to open its doors fully to gays and lesbians. She serves on the steering committee of the Chicago Consultation, a group of Episcopal clergy, bishops and lay people who support those efforts toward inclusion.And as chair of the Episcopal Church’s Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music from 2009 to 2015, she oversaw the commission’s drafting of rites for same-sex marriages. Based on the commission’s work, General Convention in 2015  made canonical and liturgical changes to provide marriage equality for Episcopalians.“I see people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer as part of God’s wonderfully diverse humanity,” Meyers said. “I am delighted that the Episcopal Church has moved more and more into a welcoming stance.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Glitter Ash Wednesday takes ritual, adds glitter, mixes in meaning, sparks debate March 1, 2017 at 12:23 am I never have understood people proudly wearing their ashes all day, hoping they will be asked what they mean so they can set themselves apart from their neighbors and co-workers who are mystified by the practice. After pronouncing to the congregation the reasons ashes of repentance are in order, and marking my forehead and theirs, I always washed them off before appearing in public. “But when you fast, put oil on your head and wash your face, so that your fasting may be seen not by others…” Bob Griffith says: Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Rev. William D. Razz Waff, DMin, BCC says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 John Smart says: Rector Washington, DC March 1, 2017 at 4:50 pm I couldn’t agree more. The ashes are about our sinfulness and mortality not our sexuality. Ruth Myers is right…..and if CDSP is against it……:;) Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Bill Louis says: March 4, 2017 at 10:46 pm I love the focus of your comment. However, being LGBT, or being part of any minority group, brings with it not being part of the power-wielding majority. Therefore, what any Christian does to show loving support for “the least of these” (anyone in a vulnerable -non-dominant- position) is likely a wonderful thing to celebrate by Christ and His friends in Heavenly bliss. I believe those who developed this glitter ash had only love and respect in mind. Church tradition certainly cannot stand against that kind of Christ-like boldness or we will become Pharisees all over again. Please accept others’ statements of love with gratitude and humility, my friends of every orientation!! Daniel Anderson Pulley says: March 1, 2017 at 6:45 am Well said John! March 1, 2017 at 1:07 pm General Convention has used the mistaken view of Via Media (reduced as only “compromise”) to under-gird its positions taken on many issues. Now that marriage has been redefined according to human terms there can never be a reason to refuse a blessing on the many unique future pairings that society will invent for itself. Within 75 years this Church will be forced to bless 3 people in a marriage – because that is a direction that society is already leaning. Having jettisoned all restraint except “what is fair and loving” there will be no choice. So, I guess, our liturgy will also continue to become more inventive and of the “Church of Me” as a consequence. That door was flung open and this type of Ash Wednesday practice is the reaping. But, there may still be enough who believe that the self-aggrandizing, self-promotion, identity politics, and cultural drift that often passes for “respecting the dignity of all persons” needs repentance rather than accommodation. Richard Leggett says: Ian B Montgomery says: Liz Zivanov says: G H Clayton says: March 1, 2017 at 9:27 am In the late 1970s I was assistant to The Very Reverend Robert Greenfield, Dean of the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist in Portland, Oregon. At our first Ash Wednesday service Dean Greenfield did something that I had never seen done before. On a table in the narthex he had placed a small bowl of water and tissues. He told the congregation to wipe the ashes off their foreheads as they left the church. No other action is more in keeping with the Ash Wednesday gospel than that. I have done the same at every Ash Wednesday service I have officiated at ever since. Too often we emerge from the service wearing the ashes as if they were a badge of honor we are showing off to those without a smudge on their foreheads. That, it seems to me, is totally the opposite of the meaning of the gospel. I’m afraid glitter ashes takes that self-centered opposition to new heights! Associate Rector Columbus, GA John Smart says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA February 28, 2017 at 10:25 pm As a gay man, a Christian and an increasingly annoyed Episcopalian let me state clearly: This is the worse idea i’ve heard in a very long time. What is wrong with Episcopalians of this generation? Esp, frankly, straight , white ones. Why must they always chose the most vapid expression of banal liberalism and call it “support” for their victim of the week. It is degrading. It is condescending. It is all the worst of PC culture rapped up in the condescending belief that gay people are weak children who need long standing – sexuality neutral – traditions changed or we might suddenly not feel included and cry in the corner. It is so offensive. I am so sick of it. I NEED MY MORTALITY AND COMMITMENT TO CHRIST AFFIRMED ON ASH WEDNESDAY. Not my gayness. Lord I really want to slap these insulting “liberals” . Perhaps next year they can infantilize us more by pushing our foreheads with silly putty and afterward we can all go make gay theme crafts with dry macaroni and paper plates. Jerry Emerson says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA March 1, 2017 at 12:28 am I love you John Smart! March 1, 2017 at 1:08 am Me, too. End of Ash Wednesday, off with ashes. . . and no drive-bys either. LN Steffensen says: February 28, 2017 at 7:24 pm Interesting: I had for thirty years years used both the phrases “You are dust,etc and You are star dust, etc.” as a way of connecting our mortality to the reality of the whole and lively universe, to infinitude as residing in infinity and the theology of recapitulation. I suppose I might have considered glitter incorporated in some way, maybe more on Easter as another way of connecting death and resurrection. As a symbolic statement to include humans who are already included as we are all as the children of the divine. . . got to give that some thinking. Maybe the deepest issue to me is to rethink sin and repentance as connected to death and eternal life. I guess I have come to see original sin as a way of understanding the great sins of human history such as original sin as in particular my/our American original sin of slavery/racism that continues to plague us all systemically. That original sin needs my/our penitence daily and recognition of its permeation into all exclusionary devices. For that I understand the imposition of good plain ash. . . Anne Bay says: March 1, 2017 at 1:03 am Spiritual symbolism is always a fascinating part of any religious entity. This was a very interesting article. I am not familiar with the “Glitter” ashes. I think it’s always a good idea to bring awareness to the LGBT Community and the thinking behind the “Glitter” ashes I think does this. With the current Trump era of hate and racism and anti-almost every treasured gift of diversity we have in the U.S. I can understand the possibility of this being a positive way to support diversity, with focus on the LGBT Community. I don’t think it detracts from the ‘old-timers’ like me who are used to doing the ashes the same way every year. As I am a senior citizen now, if there’s one thing that I’ve learned is variety and change are crucial to enlighten and brighten our lives. Of course, people can choose which ashes to have. Having a child who is now an adult but was in high school when there was a new awareness of the LGBT Community I can say we’ve come a ways, but we have a long way to go. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Comments are closed. March 1, 2017 at 2:05 am I agree wholeheartedly with Ruth Meyers. Transgendered and ordained, I need no “glitter” on the foreheads of others to feel comfortable and affirmed in my identity or to remind me to strive every day to upend oppressive power structures. On Ash Wednesday, I feel a need to pause and reflect on my mortality. “Glitter” is but a frivolous distraction from that necessary task of reflection. Anne Omelianowich says: Featured Events March 1, 2017 at 3:53 am As a life long Episcopalian who happens to be a gay man, I consider this to be a poor idea. It mixes two symbols, cheapening them both. By having two sets of ashes, we further divide ourselves. Let’s keep this ancient rite solemn. Bling and commercialism have stolen Christmas and to some degree Easter, do we need to secularize Ash Wednesday as well? Pjcabbiness says: Terry Francis says: March 1, 2017 at 10:29 am When I first read the article, I was impressed with the connection of mortality and the universal truth that we all are the same, and all are one. I thought ‘what a creative and expressive idea’ and thought also that it could deepen further the unity we all surely embrace as God’s creations. But then I read all of the comments posted here; and that discussion caused me to pause and take another look. What impacted me most was the reaction of LGBT people. Too often we look at things from the view of an observer and think we have inspired ideas that should have been vetted with those directly affected.The ashes I receive today will not have any glitter in them, but in my heart there is a deepened call to oneness in our mortality. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Ronald Lind Reed says: February 28, 2017 at 8:51 pm And Jesus said, “When you put ashes on your forehead as a sign of your mortality, do not mix them with your political or social causes, for that is what the self-congratulatory do, in order to be seen and admired by others. But when you put ashes on your forehead, keep it simple and seek not to send a message to your brothers and sisters, and God who sees in secret will not laugh at loud at your vain attempt to be relevant.” The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Collierville, TN Comments navigation Newer comments March 3, 2017 at 12:25 pm Do you mean the sin of tackiness or intolerance? The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group The Rev. Dr. Gerard F. Beritela says: Steven Catanich says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Bath, NC February 28, 2017 at 9:58 pm This strikes me as mixing metaphors, or in this case, sacramentals signs. The starkness of the black ashes- signifying our mortality- should be more than sufficient for Ash Wednesday. February 28, 2017 at 8:13 pm So glad to see a priest who actually acts upon the Gospel reading for the day.Matthew 6:1-6,16-21“And whenever you fast, do not look dismal, like the hypocrites, for they disfigure their faces so as to show others that they are fasting. Truly I tell you, they have received their reward. But when you fast, put oil on your head and wash your face, so that your fasting may be seen not by others but by your Father who is in secret; and your Father who sees in secret will reward you. Ronald Lind Reed says: Doug Desper says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 By David PaulsenPosted Feb 28, 2017 Mary Clinard Borge says: March 1, 2017 at 12:31 am Another reason to leave the Episcopal church. ALL people need to be reminded of the sacrifice of Christ, that they are loved and forgiven, that God created us from the dust of the earth and to that dust we shall return. ALL people – not just GLBT. Why should they be set apart, yet again, as different, special, and above the traditions of God’s church. You’ve been part of the church for millions of years, we all know you’re here, ordained, and a blessed gift to us all. Why do you have to make light of a profound tradition and the beginning of a time of deep repentance before Christ’s Passion. I think it goes well beyond a sexual preference. To be trite : All Life Matters. March 1, 2017 at 10:42 am Bob, Of course. It is all in public now. God Bless. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Kellie Wachter says: March 1, 2017 at 9:26 am I love this, John. As you do, I am fed up with it all. Do you mind if I use your words – quote you if you want me to use your name? Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Adrian A. Amaya says: Vicki Gray says: Rector Shreveport, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Lent March 1, 2017 at 5:34 pm From Glitter to Glitter…19For the fate of the sons of men and the fate of beasts is the same. As one dies so dies the other; indeed, they all have the same breath and there is no advantage for man over beast, for all is vanity. 20All go to the same place. All came from the glitter and all return to the glitter. Why make a mockery of the ashes that have for centuries indicated repentance and a focus outside of one’s self – outside of one’s identity? The point of the ashes is to point to an identity in Christ. To make Ash Wednesday a political statement is just wrong Press Release Service March 1, 2017 at 12:22 am As a gay man I think this is awful. Some priests need to go back to seminary. February 28, 2017 at 8:40 pm We tried this about ten years ago with the children of the church. The priest imposed the ashes with the words, “Remember that stardust thou art and to stardust thou shalt return.” AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Knoxville, TN Comments navigation Newer comments Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Fr. Carlton Kelley says: The Rev. Fred Fenton says: March 14, 2017 at 12:15 pm Good intentions do not make a bad idea any less bad. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York March 1, 2017 at 12:42 pm No. This is just wrong on so many levels. It dilutes and makes a mockery of the symbolism of the ashes and serves no purpose other than to set LGBT Christians apart. This day is about our humanity, not sexual orientation or race or ethnicity. Just leave the ashes alone. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest March 1, 2017 at 8:18 pm I’m another Gay man who thinks this idea is misguided. Glitter ashes completely misses the point about Ash Wednesday. It’s about acknowledging our mortality, the fact that we all come from the dust of the earth and return to it again. (By the way, the “stardust” alternative is just as misguided, or even more so, in my opinion. It seems to leave the worshiper with an inflated feeling about their nature, just the OPPOSITE of what Ash Wednesday is all about). Why can’t we accept for once the stark reality of our own limitations? Our culture is so obsessed with denying the reality of death, we shouldn’t be denying it on the one day in the Christian year we are bidden to embrace it!Don’t get me wrong, I love being gay, I love the Episcopal Church’s inclusion and I love glitter! Just not on Ash Wednesday. Comments (38) Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY February 28, 2017 at 10:40 pm Ash Wednesday isn’t about sexual orientation. It is about death. Please leave the glitter outside. John Speller says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Ann A Whitfield says: Submit an Event Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Tags Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA March 1, 2017 at 12:02 am Frivolous, disrespectful, theologically unsound and utterly juvenile.last_img read more

New bishop announced on island of Borneo

first_imgNew bishop announced on island of Borneo Featured Jobs & Calls AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [Anglican Communion News Service] The Rev. Danald Jute has been appointed as the 14th bishop of the Diocese of Kuching, the capital of the Malaysian state of Sarawak on the island of Borneo. Danald’s consecration and installation will take place next month at St Thomas’ Cathedral in Kuching.Full article. Tags Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Bath, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Posted Jul 6, 2017 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Events Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit an Event Listing Rector Collierville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Washington, DC Anglican Communion Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID last_img read more