Sharks’ NYC visits stir emotional 9/11 experiences

first_imgNEW YORK — Seventeen years later, it still hits hard whenever the Sharks come to New York City.Jamie Baker lost two of his college teammates here on Sept. 11, 2001. Dan Rusanowsky, the Sharks radio voice, lost a childhood friend and a college classmate. Kevin Labanc lost a next-door neighbor. Joakim Ryan lost a close family friend.“It’s impossible to not think about 9-11 when you’re in New York City,” Rusanowsky said Tuesday. “It’s something I’ll never forget, a sober reminder that makes you …last_img read more

Warriors’ Kevin Durant on reports of his interest in Knicks: “I have no clue where that stuff comes from”

first_imgPresuming that he opts out of his $31-million player option, where will Durant sign as a free agent next summer? That inquiry had a new twist, … * * *Subscribe to the Mercury News and East Bay Times for $40 a year and receive a free Warriors championship coffee table bookOAKLAND — Kevin Durant knew the questions were coming, even before he sat in the interview chair. After all, the questions have remained the topic of conversation throughout his 2018-19 season with the Warriors.last_img read more

A plea to Sharks: Marleau & Thornton one last time

first_imgEditor’s note: This column was originally published June 9, 2019, when a reunion between Patrick Marleau and the Sharks wasn’t even a gleam in Doug Wilson’s eye. Take a bow, Guest columnist Garrett Wroblewski.Sharks general manager Doug Wilson has a heavy summer to-do list ahead of him, a Brent-Burns-butt-check of a summer to-do list.His top priority will be signing soon-to-be-free-agent Erik Karlsson, an offensive wizard whose uneven debut season in San Jose showed flashes of brilliance.Rela …last_img read more

GM, Isuzu keep trucking in SA

first_img23 October 2006Japan’s Isuzu Motors and General Motors South Africa (GMSA) are to invest R80-million (R40-million each) in a new joint venture company that will take over the marketing, sales and support of all Isuzu trucks weighing over 3.5 tons in SA and its neighbouring countries.The investment comes on the back of booming vehicle sales and strong economic growth prospects for the country as a whole.South African new vehicle sales hit an all-time record of over 617 000 units in 2005 – up from 480 879 units in 2004 and 381 456 units in 2003 – making the country one of the best performing automobile markets internationally.The year’s sales were driven by in large part by trucks, with light commercial vehicle sales up by 25.9% over 2004, medium commercial sales up a massive 41.8%, and heavy commercial sales up 24.5%.“The South African market scale is likely to grow as big as the Australian market scale,” Isuzu said in a statement on Monday.To date, GMSA has been marketing and distributing Isuzu-make trucks and pickups in South Africa along with its own GM-brand passenger cars.Now, Isuzu and GMSA have agreed to establish Isuzu Truck South Africa (Pty) Limited as a joint venture company capitalised at R80-million – 50% held by Isuzu and 50% held by GMSA – to enable Isuzu to get more involved in the commercial vehicle business in southern Africa.While GMSA will continue to handle distribution of Isuzu’s 1-ton light commercial vehicle range, Isuzu Truck SA will handle the medium and heavy trucks, starting in January 2007 (subject to local competition authority approval).GMSA’s Malcolm Gould told Business Report on Friday that Isuzu Truck SA would spend R350-million over two years on upgrading the current Isuzu truck national retailer network and expanding GMSA’s Isuzu truck assembly capacity at its Kempston Road plant in Port Elizabeth.Isuzu said it plans to grow its market share for commercial vehicles in South Africa from 8% in 2005 (2 307 units) to 13% in 2007 (3 500 units) and 20% in 2010 (5 600 units).Gauld told Business Day that Isuzu Truck SA would operate as a separate entity with offices in Johannesburg and 48 members of staff, including 40 new positions as well as two senior secondments from Isuzu Motors Japan: Masatoshi Kobayashi (MD) and Hiroshi Iizuka (business co-ordination and special projects manager).SouthAfrica.info reporter Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

How The Flood Of Digital Photos Adds Significance To The Ones We Print

first_imgTags:#Facebook#Instagram#mobile photography#Pause#photography Related Posts Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification john paul titlow The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videoscenter_img In the age of digital cameras on a billion smartphones, the world is collectively creating a staggering number of photographs. You probably have a few hundred shots in your pocket right now, and that doesn’t count the thousands you’ve backed up somewhere else, nor the ones available from the cloud. On Facebook alone, people upload 300 million photos every day. Just as important, we have ubiquitous new ways to view and share all those photos, from mobile phones to tablets to computers of all sorts. With how radically technology has upended the way we take and share photographs, you’d think that printing images would be dead by now.Far from it. As it turns out, the act of preserving our favorite images in the analog world is becoming newly meaningful.The Internet and computers of all shapes and sizes have made producing and consuming content easier than ever. We’re awash in more information, news, opinions, artwork, photographs, videos and songs than our brains know what to do with. It’s overwhelming. Ironically, choosing to pull the best or most meaningful bits out of this endless digital river as it rages by and solidifying them in a physical format, means more now that it did when all content was analog.Today, analog isn’t just hip. It’s relaxing. Putting on a vinyl record is an altogether different experience from shuffling a Spotify playlist, just as cozying up with a paperback book can help us feel more focused than reading on an iPad. Likewise, tapping the “Like” button on a Facebook photo means one thing. Hanging it on your wall or refrigerator is quite another. Even better, turn your favorite photos into a book. Turn Your Instagrams Into… Pretty Much Anything Look at Instagram. As the social photo app has exploded into the mainstream – hitting 100 million users more quickly than either Facebook or Twitter did – there’s been a corresponding rise in third-party services designed to let people turn Instagram photos into physical artifacts. Sure, you could easily upload photos from Instagram or any other mobile source to one of the many standard photo-printing sites, but this new breed of Instagram-specific services streamlines the process by letting you authenticate with your Instagram account and pull photos directly from your own stream. With many of them, you can just select images and place an order from your phone. It’s ideal for making the sort of glossy photographic prints we’ve always cherished, but people are turning to these services for much more than that. Printstagram sells Instagram prints, posters, photo books and calendars. Art Flakes has stickers. Want magnets? Try StickyGram. If you used Instagram to snap photos on vacation, Postagram will turn them into postcards. CanvasPop will print your photos on high-quality canvas. And the list goes on. Meanwhile, printing photos from Facebook and Instagram is now a standard feature on kiosks at places like Walgreens and Target. Long gone are the days where we dropped off a roll of 24 mystery pictures, waited an hour (or a week) and then shuffled through a stack of mediocre shots to see if there were any gems mixed in. Today, printing is a much more deliberate act, reserved for only the images we appreciate the most. The rest of them will sit on hard drives and Facebook Timelines to be scrolled through at our leisure. Many of them, of course, will never get looked at by anyone. The ones you take the time and trouble to print, though, those are the ones you’re gonna make sure everyone sees. Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Auditlast_img read more

Many in Odisha denied PDS rice due to non-seeding of Aadhaar

first_imgThe ‘One Nation, One Ration Card’ scheme seems to be not working in favour of many in Odisha, according to a survey that found that hundreds of people have not been provided rice through the Public Distribution System for two months due to non-seeding of Aadhaar. The study also found that exclusion due to Aadhaar linking is more prevalent in tribal areas.A study of 63 villages in Nabarangpur district found that out of 1,271 people in 272 households surveyed, 435 have not been provided PDS rice for September and October due to non-seeding of Aadhaar. Out of these, 35% are children between 0-10 years of age.The survey was conducted during the first week of October by the Odisha chapter of the National Right to Food Campaign, an informal network of organisations and individuals working on right to food issues.PDS rice for two months was distributed in Kalahandi-Bolangir-Koraput area from September 20 to 30, according to Sameet Panda of the food campaign.Ineligible personsOut of 272 families, there were 17 households having a total of 50 members who have not received grain for September and October as none of the family members were seeded in PDS-Aadhaar.There are 255 such families where Aadhaar of one or more family members has not been seeded. There are 385 persons across these 255 households who have not been seeded into Aadhaar, so their names have been eliminated.The survey found that there are 17 persons who are ineligible. They include those dead; female members married outside; and not available in the village.Out of 435 persons whose Aadhaar has not been seeded, 185 persons don’t have Aadhaar. The survey team met those who have applied for Aadhaar several times but have not received it so far, said Mr. Panda.There are 228 persons who have an Aadhaar number but it has not been seeded yet. Out of them, 72 persons have submitted their Aadhaar in the gram panchayat but they don’t know why it has not been seeded. There are 17 such persons whose Aadhaar number is reflected in the PDS card but their name has been deleted.last_img read more