Benefit National Adoption Month at The Langham Huntington Hotel

first_img Top of the News Community News Benefit National Adoption Month at The Langham Huntington Hotel From STAFF REPORTS Published on Tuesday, November 8, 2016 | 11:29 am Community News Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Business News faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Donald CommunityPCC- COMMUNITYVirtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Community News More Cool Stuff 10 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it center_img Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Herbeauty9 Of The Best Family Friendly Dog BreedsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThat Sale Made Kim A BillionaireHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty7 Most Startling Movie Moments We Didn’t Realize Were InsensitiveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyA Mental Health Chatbot Which Helps People With DepressionHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyUnapologetic Celebs Women AdoreHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyAmazing Sparks Of On-Screen Chemistry From The 90-sHerbeautyHerbeauty EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS In honor of National Adoption Awareness Month in November, The Langham Huntington, Pasadena has partnered with Five Acres to create awareness for their Permanency Campaign “20,000 by 2020,” which educates the public about the need for permanent placement for children of all ages in foster care.The Langham’s National Adoption Awareness Month Rate is valid for stays from November 1 – December 27, 2016. For guests who book the package, The Langham will donate 10% of proceeds from each room booked to benefit Five Acres’ 20,000 by 2020 Campaign, intended to help every single child in foster care to find a loving, permanent family by the year 2020.Five Acres recently celebrated a remarkable birthday– 128 years of uninterrupted service to Southern California caring for vulnerable children and their families. Originally founded in downtown Los Angeles as an orphanage, their initial mission was simply to provide safety to children who had no home. In time, their mission expanded to also focus on the well-being of their clients and caring for the mental and emotional health of children who were increasingly coming to them as a result of abuse or neglect. They now care for nearly 8,500 children and family members annually across five counties; they now strive for permanency – a permanent, loving home – for all those in our care.The three pillars – safety, well-being and permanency – provide the framework for all of Five Acres’ current programs and they will guide our steps in the future as we continue seeking even more effective means of caring for children and families in crisis.The Langham is located at 1401 S Oak Knoll Ave, Pasadena. Visit www.langhamhotels.com/en/the-langham/pasadena/ for more information. Subscribe Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Make a comment First Heatwave Expected Next Week Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

Guidance: Medicines that you cannot export from the UK or hoard

first_imgThis document lists the medicines that cannot be exported from the UK or hoarded. The list is updated regularly.The government has produced guidance on export and hoarding of restricted medicines.In October 2019 a letter to holders of a wholesale dealer licence was sent out about the restrictions on parallel exports.From 1 January 2021 you may no longer be able to export branded medicines that have been placed on the UK market to countries in the European Economic Area (EEA). Check the guidance on changes to the exhaustion of Intellectual Property rights and parallel trade from 1 January 2021.Hoarding or exporting a medicine on the list is considered a breach of regulation 43(2) of the Human Medicines Regulations 2012 and a contravention of the wholesale dealer licence and may lead to regulatory action by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), which could include immediate suspension of the wholesale dealer licence.last_img read more

Vermont Health Department monitors newly contaminated wells at Vermont Yankee

first_imgIn the past month, three groundwater monitoring wells that previously tested negative for tritium have now been shown to be contaminated. All three wells ‘ GZ-23S, GZ-6 and GZ-24S ‘ are north of the underground plume of tritium-contaminated groundwater that the Health Department has been monitoring for the past 13 months. GZ-23S is much closer to the plume, as it is currently defined, compared to GZ-6 and GZ-24S. GZ-23S is approximately on a line between GZ-12 and GZ-13, two sites that have both yielded samples positive for tritium over the last several months. ( Vermont Yankee Groundwater Well Map )These newest results could be evidence that the original plume is broadening from north to south along the river, or that there are other sources responsible for tritium contamination. Vermont Yankee is investigating nearby plant structures, systems and components to determine the source. Northstar Vermont Yankee,The Vermont Department of Health received laboratory data late last week from Entergy Vermont Yankee that indicates samples from groundwater monitoring well GZ-23S tested positive for low levels of tritium. Vermont Yankee’s lower limit of detection (LLD) for tritium is in the range of 670 to 700 picocuries per liter (pCi/L). The test results for the samples collected from GZ-23S during the week of January 24 were 714 and 721 pCi/L. The only sample from GZ-23S that the Health Department Laboratory has received and analyzed so far was taken on December 6 ‘ tritium was not detected in that sample. Vermont Yankee officials also noted that they are plotting all of the underground utilities that run through the plume from the Advanced Off-Gas (AOG) building area. This will help in evaluating whether these structures and components could act as conduits of tritium from the AOG plume into the area sampled by wells GZ-24S and GZ-6. Vermont Yankee officials have verified that they have made provisions to keep the river’s edge site free from winter ice that could prevent testing, and that they plan to sample the COB well again in February.   Groundwater ExtractionAccording to Vermont Yankee, as of February 3 approximately 317,000 gallons of tritium-contaminated groundwater has been pumped out of the ground to date, with approximately 9,700 of those gallons extracted since the re-start of that process on December 30, 2010. Sampling ProvisionsThe Health Department has been urging Vermont Yankee to sample river water at the river’s edge near the centerline of the AOG plume. Groundwater Monitoring Well ResultsThe results that follow are as reported by Vermont Yankee for tritium on February 3, 2011. In addition, Vermont Yankee has been reporting sample results every day to the Health Department since February 1, 2011.As of this report, 11 of the 31 groundwater monitoring wells are testing positive for tritium. With the exception of wells GZ-23S, GZ-6 and GZ-24S, the trend over the past several months has been that tritium concentrations in groundwater near plant structures, systems and components are decreasing. Trends for wells GZ-14 and GZ-22D, the two extraction sites, are trending downward as expected. Trends for GZ-23S, GZ-6 and GZ-24S, as described above, have remained relatively stable over the past two weeks. For this week, only GZ-15 had an increased tritium concentration compared to the last sample date.To date, gamma spectroscopy and special analyses for hard-to-detect radionuclides have not identified any other nuclear power plant-related radioactive materials in groundwater, drinking water or river water.GZ-1: GZ-2: GZ-3: 108,000 on 1/31/11, down from 121,275 on 1/24/11GZ-4: 70,000 on 1/31/11, down from 78,555 on 1/24/11GZ-5: GZ-6: GZ-7: 3,117 on 1/31/11, down from 3,474 on 1/4/11GZ-8: No sample; dry wellGZ-9: GZ-10: GZ-11: GZ-12S: 1,877 on 1/31/11, down from 3,268 on 1/17/11GZ-12D: 114,962 on 1/31/11, down from 130,857 on 1/17/11GZ-13S: GZ-13D: 880 on 1/31/11, down from 1,095 on 1/4/11GZ-14S: 334,136 on 1/31/11, down from 442,149 on 1/10/11GZ-14D: GZ-15: 144,700 on 1/26/11, up from 141,585 on 1/4/11GZ-16: GZ-17: GZ-18S: GZ-18D: GZ-19S: GZ-19D: GZ-20: GZ-21: 6,853 on 1/31/11, down from 8,673 on 1/17/11GZ-22D: 354,906 on 1/31/11, down from 398,557 on 1/17/11GZ-23S: GZ-24S: 4,857 on 2/3/11, down from 8,139 on 1/26/11GZ-25S: GZ-26S: GZ-27S: Source: Vermont Department of Health 2.7.2011 Vermont Yankee officials noted that the soils near GZ-24S and GZ-6 are of very low permeability. This means groundwater moves slowly through the soils. State officials will get further hydrogeological information at a technical briefing scheduled for February 10. The Departments of Health and Environmental Conservation have recommended for some time that samples be frequently obtained from the Construction Office Building (COB) well. Regular sampling will help determine the tritium concentration in this former drinking water well, which is 360 feet deep into bedrock, and help to better understand if other deep water sources could become contaminated. Groundwater Source InvestigationIn a teleconference on February 3, Vermont Yankee noted that it had completed pressure testing of two piping runs suspected as possible sources of new leaks. These are two of five piping runs that are high on the list of possible sources near GZ-24S. In fact, the well was sited at this location to monitor these particular piping runs. Pressure testing indicated that these two piping runs do not appear to be leaking. Preparations are underway to pressure test the other three piping runs. All of these five piping runs are drain lines for systems that normally carry gases. This means that less liquid travels through them. It also means that the concentration of other radioactive materials like cobalt-60, cesium-137 and strontium-90 (Co-60, Cs-137 and Sr-90) should be lower as compared to liquid processing lines. Vermont Yankee officials noted, however, that the concentration of tritium in these drain lines is similar to that of systems that process predominantly liquids with concentrations of about 3 million pCi/L. The Health Department Laboratory will continue to perform additional analyses on well samples from this new investigation area.last_img read more

Trail Mix April 2014: Free Music Download

first_img I’d love to tell you to grab this month’s Trail Mix, slap it into your iPod, and head for a hike or bike ride on some green trailway near you, but I’ll be damned if Mother Nature isn’t just stone drunk. If you’re like me, you look at the weather forecast with a skeptical eye, with absolutely no assurance of what tomorrow might bring. Snow? Sure! 70 degrees the next day? Why not!!One thing you can be sure of is the epicness of this month’s Trail Mix. It’s big. Nearly thirty tracks of roots music goodness. The April mix opens with a track from The String Cheese Incident, who return with Song In My Head, the band’s first full length record in nine years. Trail Mix is stoked to include the title track from the record this month.April’s mix is also rich with some of the best songwriters you might have heard of, along with a slew you might have missed so far. You should know guys like Bobby Bare, Jr., who returns with his Young Criminals’ Starvation League, and the mix also features the new cuts from Kathy Kallick, Will Kimbrough and Luther Dickinson. Be sure to check out tracks from newcomers like Nathaniel Rateliff, Sam Morrow, A.J. Ellis, and Bradford Lee Folk.Like the blues? Trail Mix has you covered with Bobby Rush & Dr. John’s new tune, and be sure to check out the new one from Ray Bonneville.Like a little rockabilly country? Check out Moot Davis.Maybe you are a child of the 80s? Check out the retro pop vibe of Eternal Summers, who are also featured in the print magazine this month.Big fan of ridiculous acoustic shredding? You definitely need to hear the new one from The Infamous Stringdusters, who release their new record, Let It Go, this month. The mix also features new tracks from guitar whiz Bryan Sutton and fiddler extraordinaire Darol Anger.And that’s just the start. There’s a whole lot more. Dig in. Check it out. Share with your friends and on your favorite social network. And, as always, be sure to buy a few of these records. Download them. Buy some vinyl. Just help us support these great artists who are so willing to support Trail Mix.Speaking of supporting Trail Mix, I need to give a big shout out to the good folks at Rooster Walk Music & Arts Festival, one of Virginia’s finest music festivals, for sponsoring this month’s mix. Rooster Walk takes place in late May, and the line up is hot. For more information, check out their website at www.roosterwalk.com, and look forward to May’s mix, which will feature all Rooster Walk artists. String Cheese Incident – Song In My HeadA.J. Ellis – Stand UpBobby Bare Jr.’s Young Criminals’ Starvation League – North of Alabama By Mornin’Bobby Rush with Dr. John & Blinddog Smokin’ – Stand BackBradford Lee Folk – The Wood SwanBryan Sutton – Log JamCurtis Harding – Keep On ShiningDarol Anger – The Denver Belle.mp3Eternal Summers – GougeGreg Smith & The Broken English – Losing HandHamell on Trial – TogetherHeather Maloney & Darlingside – WoodstockJapanther – Do ItJonny Two Bags – One Foot In The GutterKathy Kallick – Time Traveler’s WifeLost & Nameless – Empty SpacesLuther Dickinson – VandalizeMoot Davis – Love HangoverNathaniel Rateliff – When Do You SeeRay Bonneville – Love Is WickedSam Morrow – Old SoulTattletale Saints – Complicated ManThe Infamous Stringdusters – Let It GoThe Iveys – Jenna’s SongThe War On Drugs – Red EyesWill Kimbrough – Sideshow Lovelast_img read more

Ecuadorian Colonel On Trial For Alleged Complicity With FARC

first_imgBy Dialogo April 01, 2009 An Ecuadorian army colonel is being prosecuted for alleged collusion with the Colombian FARC guerrillas, which may be considered a grave offense against national security, the TV channel Teleamazonas revealed. They noted that Colonel José Hidalgo has been prosecuted in the military court since May 2007 for alleged complicity with the FARC, but has not been sentenced. Ecuadorian Defense Minister Javier Ponce told Teleamazonas that the attitude of this officer with the Colombian guerrillas “is very, very serious” and added that “it can be considered an attack on national security.” “It is an issue that cannot be generalized,” the official said, and stressed that “Lt. Col. Hidalgo does not really understand the principles and guidelines of both the Armed Forces and the national government in the case of confrontations with irregular groups.” Citing an intelligence report, Teleamazonas said that Hidalgo met, on two occasions between March and April 2007, with a FARC guerrilla identified as ‘Commander Marlene’ on the Ecuadorian side of the Amazonian border with Colombia. They added that a military patrol found 15 armed rebels under the command of ‘Marlene,’ who asked to telephone the colonel to coordinate a meeting, which occurred two hours later. For this event there were no arrests. Quito’s diplomatic relations with Bogota were broken off after the Colombian military attack on an underground FARC camp in Ecuadorian territory on March 1 that left 25 dead, including the rebel leader Raúl Reyes. Ecuador has set five terms for Colombia for the restoration of diplomatic ties, among them to cease linking Ecuador with the FARC.last_img read more

Do This: Long Island Concerts & Events January 7 – 13

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Jim Morrison CelebrationWild Child’s Dave Brock steals the stage for a third time as rock legend Jim Morrison, honoring the energetic magic and emotional depth of the 1960s lizard king and legendary frontman for The Doors. To pay your respects, go to Paris where Morrison is buried. To relive his greatness, come see Wild Child’s Dave Brock in person. The Paramount, 370 New York Ave., Huntington. paramountny.com $15-$25. 8 p.m. January 7.Peter Noone in conversation with Micky DolenzThese two have entertained you for decades as members of Herman’s Hermits and The Monkees, respectively. But for one night only fans will get the chance to see these musical icons in a completely different way. Join Noone and Dolenz for an evening of conversation as they together share stories about what really happened during their life in the Rock & Roll spotlight both on stage and off. The Space at Westbury, 250 Post Ave., Westbury. thespaceatwestbury.com $35-$125. 8 p.m. January 7.Devon Allman BandThis young Allman did not come on the music scene riding the coattails of a famous parent. Devon has been living his own musical life for decades. After playing in local bands and working in Guitar Center in St. Louis and touring with various bands, Devon is committed to performing dates with his own band, with a renewed intensity. YMCA Boulton Center for the Performing Arts, 37 West Main St., Bay Shore. boultoncenter.org $35-$40. 8 p.m. January 7.Hoda KotbThis bestselling author and beloved co-host of the Today Show’s fourth hour will speak and sign her new cookbook, Where We Belong: Journeys That Show Us The Way. The book includes inspiring stories of people who find their life’s purpose in unexpected ways, often surprising themselves and the ones they love. Book Revue, 313 New York Ave., Huntington bookrevue.com Price of book. 7 p.m. January 8.The CastThese former members of Beatlemania recreate the sights and sounds of The Fab Four so faithfully that you will feel like you’re witnessing the first wave of the British Invasion. Suffolk Theater, 118 E Main St., Riverhead. suffolktheater.com $40-$49. 7 p.m. January 8.Upright Citizens BrigadeCatch the best new improv comedians from the acclaimed Upright Citizens Brigade Theatres in New York and Los Angeles. In this 90-minute, unscripted and totally improvised performance, four improvisers at the top of their game perform a high-energy, surprising and hilarious show that has never been seen before and will never be seen again. The UCB Theatre—founded by Amy Poehler, Matt Besser, Ian Roberts and Matt Walsh—has been home to some of the biggest stars in comedy today. Landmark on Main Street, 232 Main Street, Suite 1, Port Washington. landmarkonmainstreet.org $22-$27. 8 p.m. January 8.Friday Night FeverThe ‘70s disco is “Stayin’ Alive” thanks to The New York Bee Gees Tribute Show. Rainere Martin embodies the grace, energy, and of course, voice of Donna Summer; Sir Duke captures Stevie Wonders’, well, musical wonder. It’s a sparkling night of nostalgia not to be missed. The Paramount, 370 New York Ave., Huntington. paramountny.com $10-$40. 8 p.m. January 8.Teddy Kumpel’s Swamp SoireèThe Swamp Soireè is Teddy’s party band. They play all kinds of covers and originals in a swampy style that matches well with Cajun food and party atmospheres. Joining Teddy will be Grammy-award winning producer Bob Stander on bass, Matt Miller on drums and Adam Minkoff on bass. Treme Blues and Jazz Club, 553 Main St., Islip. tremeislip.com $10. 8 p.m. January 8.British RegimentsCome experience the pomp and the glory of the Band of the Royal Marines and the Pipes, Drums & Highland Dancers of the Scots Guards as they perform popular classics, Big Band hits, and military marching music with their signature precision. The evening’s program, British Isles of Wonder, features famous songs of the British Isles, including “The Highland Fling,” the “Armed Forces Medley,” and new favorites, “Ice & Fire,” from Game of Thrones and “the Skye Boat Song” as featured in Outlander. Tilles Center for the Performing Arts, LIU Post, 720 Northern Blvd., Brookville. tillescenter.org $25-$80. 8 p.m. January 8.Count To TenBorn out of coping with the tragic loss of a close friend, three Wantagh boys came together to unleash therapeutic original jams and perform occasional song covers, and out of that experience came the foundation of a solid teen band. Aligning with Airgo Entertainment, this up-and-coming pop/punk group is creating all sorts of Internet and Long Island buzz. Opening the show are Nexus, Gianni Paci, Girl Nowhere and Collide & Cope. Revolution Bar & Music Hall, 140 Merrick Rd., Amityville. clubloaded.com/events $10, $12 DOS. 2:30 p.m. January 9.O-TownThis boy band, which includes Trevor Penick, Jacob Underwood, Erik-Michael Estrada, Ashley Parker Angel and Dan Miller, are reuniting as friends with a renewed passion for making music together again a decade after they broke up. They’ll play their hits, including “Liquid Dreams” and “All or Nothing.” YMCA Boulton Center for the Performing Arts, 37 West Main St., Bay Shore. boultoncenter.org $30-$35. 8 p.m. January 9.The Three Tenors (Who Can’t Sing)Vic DiBitetto, Richie Minervini and Freddie Rubino are three of the strongest headliners in comedy today. Here they combine (or collide) in a show that features not only their vastly different styles of hilarious humor…but puts them together on stage in a “last act” of incredibly funny storytelling, spontaneous human combustion and hilarious responses to questions from the audience. McGuires Comedy Club, 1627 Smithtown Ave., Bohemia mcguires.govs.com $28-$58. 7:30 p.m. January 10.Our Gang: Pint Size Comedy MastersJoin film historian Glenn Andreiev for a laugh-filled class in comic short films spotlighting visionary producer Hal Roach’s revered “Little Rascals.” The Depression-era antics of Spanky, Alfalfa, Darla and the rest of Our Gang have become embedded in popular culture as gems of American folklore. Clips from their silent-era comedic beginnings, their early talkie zenith, and their later years at MGM will be presented. Included will be a look into Hal Roach’s prolific comedy factory. Relive the fun along with Pete the Pooch, as these Little Rascals face down bizarre criminals of all types, outwit Butch the bully, wrestle with Algebra the crazed Mule, run from pirates, serve a prize-filled groaning cake, and endure many more hilarious hijinks. Cinema Arts Centre, 423 Park Ave., Huntington. cinemaartscentre.org $10 members, $15 public. 7:30 p.m. January 11.The Musical BoxMost have only heard about the English rock group Genesis’ first concert in 1973: a breathtaking and dramatic production of music legend. Now, The Musical Box recaptures the stunning artistry and wonder of that night in passionate detail. Transport back in time and relive this historic concert like never before. NYCB Theatre at Westbury, 960 Brush Hollow Rd., Westbury venue.thetheatreatwestbury.com $39.50 8 p.m. January 13.–Compiled by Chuck Cannini, Timothy Bolger & Zachary B. Tirana IIIlast_img read more

How to get the most out of your technology investment

first_img 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by: Adria SalasInvesting in technology resources can be a big decision for a lending institution—or any business for that matter. Depending on the type of resource, it can be a large monetary investment, and training and implementation can impact your short-term operations.Change is not always easy, but as I’ve learned from my experience implementing the AutoPilot loan portfolio management software for multiple financial institutions, it is well worth the temporary disruption in order to experience the kind of efficiency and productivity that a streamlined software program can offer.Click here to learn how you can streamline the collections process in 60 days.However, no matter how robust a software system or technology resource is, your institution will not experience maximum productivity unless your staff is thoroughly trained and using the resource to its full capabilities because, after all, a technology resource is only as effective as how trained and well-versed its users are. continue reading »last_img read more

Australian clinic closes after doctor tests positive for coronavirus

first_imgFour special coronavirus clinics have now been opened in Melbourne to reduce the strain on emergency departments and GP clinics.New South Wales state reported six new cases of coronavirus overnight bringing the total cases in Australia to nearly 70.Australia will release 260,000 surgical masks from medical stockpiles for immediate use, deputy chief medical officer Paul Kelly told a media briefing in Canberra.The outbreak has killed more than 3,400 people and spread across more than 90 nations, with seven countries reporting their first cases on Friday. The economic damage has also intensified, with business districts starting to empty and stock markets continuing to tumble.Topics : He saw about 70 patients between March 2 and March 6.”The doctor…most likely acquired his infection in the United States,” Mikakos said.”I have to say I am flabbergasted that a doctor that has flu-like symptoms has presented to work,” she said, adding the clinic has been closed until further notice.Mikakos said patients have been contacted while the passengers on the flight will be contacted as soon as the manifest is available. Australian health authorities said on Saturday they had closed a clinic and were contacting around 70 patients of a doctor who has been diagnosed with coronavirus after recently returning from the United States.The Melbourne-based general practioner returned to Australia on Feb. 29.He became unwell with a runny nose on an internal flight from Denver to San Francisco before flying to Melbourne on United Airlines flight 0060, Victoria State Health Minister Jenny Mikakos told a televised news conference.last_img read more

UNIT SOUZOU Brings Taiko Theatrics to Artist and Lecture Series

first_imgFacebook1Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by South Puget Sound Community CollegeSouth Puget Sound Community College welcomes Portland-based taiko company UNIT SOUZOU as part of the college’s 2014-15 Artist and Lecture Series. UNIT SOUZOU will be on campus Thursday, May 14 at 7:30 p.m. at the Kenneth J. Minnaert Center for the Arts.UNIT SOUZOU (pronounced SOH-ZOH), is the brain child of taiko veterans Michelle Fujii and Toru Watanabe. The co-directors share more than 20 years of experience, and have brought a fusion of traditional taiko and Japanese folk dance to UNIT SOUZOU. The performance is sponsored by the college’s Tomodachi club. The group will present their theatrically groundbreaking and imaginative work, “Insatiable.” This event is supported by The Japan Foundation.The South Puget Sound Community College Artist and Lecture Series brings a diverse group of distinguished scholars, activists and artists under a common theme: “Reflections.” Our presenters are recognized nationally or internationally for their work. Our hope is that they will initiate courageous and purposeful discussion within our community concerning critical and contemporary issues.Tickets for UNIT SOUZOU are $10 for general admission, (which includes a $3 Washington Center service fee), and the event is free to all SPSCC staff, faculty and students. Tickets are available online at OlyTix.org or by calling The Washington Center for the Performing Arts box office at (360) 753-8586. For more information about the Artist and Lecture Series at South Puget Sound Community College, visit www.spscc.edu/ALSeries.last_img read more

About Town

first_imgSANDY HOOKOcean Fun Days will once again be offered at Sandy Hook from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday, May 20.  For the ninth consecutive year, this popular pre-summer event will focus on eco-friendly hands-on programs and feature special tours and more that help explore and celebrate the wonders of the Jersey Shore.Ocean Fun Days, which is also slated for Island Beach State Park on Saturday, May 19, will feature dozens of exhibitors and include displays, exhibits and demonstrations that promote natural resources and energy conservation.  An annual science fair showcased at Ocean Fun Days encourages students in grades 3-6 from Ocean and Monmouth counties to discover new information about the Jersey Shore, share it with others and earn recognition and valuable prizes for their schools.This year, the Sandy Hook event, based at the NJSGC headquarters in Fort Han­cock, has been expanded to offer tours of most of the historic sites located within the park, including first-time access to the U.S. Coast Guard station and vessels.Back by popular demand, the NOAA/James J. Howard Marine Fisheries Lab will open its doors to the public for tours and the chance to meet NOAA lab scientists.A transportation loop has been set up at Sandy Hook to shuttle people around the event using a trolley provided courtesy of the Sandy Hook Foundation, natural gas jitneys and school buses.The student recipients of the NJSGC Stew Tweed Fisheries and Aquaculture Scholarships also will be announced during a special ceremony at the event.The scholarships were established in 2007 by NJSGC to honor the memory of Tweed who served as a marine agent for the New Jersey Sea Grant Extension Service between 1978 and 2005.  The scholarship perpetuates Stew’s dedication to applying fisheries and marine related technology and scientific information to the real world of shellfish aquaculture and commercial fisheries, and his commitment to educating students of all levels about sustainable fisheries and aquaculture.Ocean Fun Days is presented by New Jersey Natural Gas, in partnership with the New Jersey Sea Grant Consortium (NJSGC), the Asbury Park Press, the state Department of Environ­mental Protection, the state Division of Parks and Forestry and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).RUMSONThe Borough of Rumson will be holding its annual Memorial Day parade and service on Monday, May 28.The parade will begin at 10 a.m. The parade route will march east on Blackpoint Road to River Road, turn left (west) on River Road and proceed to Victory Park.The service will begin at Victory Park at 10:30 a.m. and will be followed by the placing of the wreaths.last_img read more