Chittenden Bank celebrates century

first_imgCHITTENDEN BANK CELEBRATES 100 YEARS SINCE CHARTERBurlington, Vermont – One hundred years ago a group of Burlingtoniansdecided that a need existed for a new financial institution in Burlington. On December 7, 1904 Chittenden County Trust Company was established andgiven two years to gather the capital to start operations.The founders of Chittenden County Trust Company were John. J. Flynn,Edward J. Booth, J.H. Macomber, E.F. Gebhardt, W.B. McKillup, E.P.Woodbury, A.O. Humphrey, J.S. Patrick and R.A. Cooke. On March 30, 1906,these individuals organized what is today Chittenden with only $50,000capital.”Chittenden has been a part of the Vermont community since 1904. Onehundred years later, we remain a significant part because of our employeesand our interest in the communities and the customers we serve” saysKathleen Schirling, Director of Marketing with Chittenden Bank.”Chittenden has grown significantly since our start in 1906, but as I lookback at our history through the years, I find one thing that has notchanged–our people! They distinguish themselves by dedicated andexceptional performance across the entire organization. Theyenthusiastically participate in planning and implementing. Thecreativity, dedication and teamwork of our Chittenden family is the reasonfor our past progress and is the foundation of our future growth. Ourpeople have a commitment to change, but we also have a dedication to thosetraditional values, which have always been at the core of Chittenden,”says Schirling.Chittenden is a full-service, Vermont-headquartered and managed bankproviding a wide range of financial services and products to individualsand businesses. As the largest Vermont-based bank in the state, Chittendenoffers over 50 locations. To find out more about Chittenden, visit ourwebsite at www.chittenden.com(link is external) or call your local branch.last_img read more

Local Businessman appointed to Board of Advisors of national HVAC group

first_imgDavid Nichols, Vice President of Climate Systems, Inc. in Williston, has been appointed to a second two-year term on the Board of Advisors of The Unified Group, a national network of 45 pre-eminent heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC).Headquartered in Chicago, The Unified Group is composed of independent HVAC contractors who share a commitment to remaining independent, while providing quality service to clients. The Board of Advisors oversees The Unified Group’s five major business areas including purchasing, business opportunities, membership, training and marketing. Participation in The Unified Group is limited to one member company per geographic area, and companies must have demonstrated a commitment to providing quality service to their clients.Climate Systems, Inc. is a locally-owned , full service and installation heating, ventilatin, air conditioning and refrigeration mechanical contractor dedicated to customer satisfaction.last_img read more

Kilawatt Technologies Becomes Member of the U.S Green Building Council

first_imgShelburne, VT-August 21, 2008- Kilawatt Technologies is pleased to announce that the company has joined the U.S. Green Building Council. The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) is an international non-profit organization working to advance buildings that are environmentally responsible, profitable and healthy places to live and work. USGBCs vision is to promote the Triple Bottom Line and pursues solutions that strengthen a healthy and dynamic balance between environmental, social and economic prosperity.Over the past few years, Kilawatt Technologies has seen a dramatic increase in the number of companies and organizations wanting their existing buildings to achieve certification in the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED). LEED certification applies to both new and existing buildings and focusing on the greening of existing commercial buildings would have a dramatic impact in cutting energy consumption and reducing harmful greenhouse gases. Currently, there are over 4.5 million commercial buildings in the United States, accounting for more than 60 percent of the nation’s electricity consumption.Kilawatt Technologies has developed a series of innovative conservation information products based on the company’s EnerSuite software that support organizations interested in achieving LEED certification. The company helps businesses conserve energy, lower costs and reduce greenhouse gases in large commercial and industrial buildings. For more information about Kilawatt Technologies, please call 802.985.2285 or visit www.kilawatt.com(link is external).####last_img read more

Small business employs more than 60 percent of Vermont’s workers

first_imgWyoming66.2% WASHINGTON, D.C. Vermont’s economic recovery will depend on small business. That message is driven home in the newly updated Vermont Small Business Profile released today by the Office of Advocacy of the U.S. Small Business Administration. The most recent data show that the state has 18,937 small employers, and they employ 63.5% of the state s workforce, the third highest percentage in the country. Vermont depends on small business for jobs and economic growth, said Shawne McGibbon, Acting Chief Counsel for Advocacy. During this time of financial stress and economic instability, policymakers need to remember that the state s small businesses provide the economic base for its families and communities.To further highlight the importance of small business, the updated profile notes that small businesses created 51.7% of the state’s net new jobs from 2004 to 2005 (latest available data).Not only does the state s economy depend on the health of its small businesses, so too does the economy of the United States.The US has slightly more than 6 million small employers, or 99.7% of all employer firms, and they provide 50.4% of its private sector employment. These firms created 78.9% of the nation s net new jobs from 2004 to 2005, and they generated more than half of the private non-farm gross domestic product.The Office of Advocacy, the small business watchdog of the federal government, examines the role and status of small business in the economy and independently represents the views of small business to federal agencies, Congress, and the President. It is the source for small business statistics presented in user-friendly formats, and it funds research into small business issues.For more information and a complete copy of state and territory small business profiles, visit the Office of Advocacy website at www.sba.gov/advo(link is external).The Office of Advocacy of the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) is an independent voice for small business within the federal government. The presidentially appointed Chief Counsel for Advocacy advances the views, concerns, and interests of small business before Congress, the White House, federal agencies, federal courts, and state policymakers. For more information, visit www.sba.gov/advo(link is external), or call (202) 205-6533.State% Workforce Employed by Small BusinessesState% Workforce Employed by Small BusinessesAlabama49.7%Missouri49.7%Alaska55.6%Montana69.8% Arizona48.8%Nebraska51.4%Arkansas48.8%Nevada44.2% California52.1%New Hampshire54.9% Colorado51.7%New Jersey  51.1% Connecticut49.6%New Mexico57.0% Delaware48.3%New York51.7%  District of Columbia48.2%North Carolina48.6%  Florida44.0%North Dakota63.3% Georgia46.3%Ohio48.6%Hawaii56.1%Oklahoma54.0% Idaho58.6%Oregon57.2%Illinois49.2%Pennsylvania 49.9%Indiana48.6%Rhode Island57.1%Iowa   51.6%South Carolina50.0% Kansas 54.6%South Dakota 63.2% Kentucky50.0%Tennessee45.1%Louisiana54.1%Texas46.8%Maine60.6%Utah49.9% Maryland53.4%Vermont63.5%Massachusetts48.3%Virginia49.4% Michigan51.6%Washington 55.7% Minnesota51.0%  West Virginia 54.3% Mississippi50.1%Wisconsin    53.4%last_img read more

Saint Michael’s dedicates the Pomerleau Alumni Center, college’s first ‘green’ building

first_imgIn ceremonies including the Board of Trustees, Saint Michael’s College will dedicate the $2 million Antonio and Rita Pomerleau Alumni Center on Saturday, Oct. 3, at 12:30 p.m. in the new center, located on Route 15, but entered from Lime Kiln Road, in Colchester. The multi-use building is the first deliberately environmentally friendly, 21st Century structure on the Saint Michael’s campus. Made possible through the generosity of The Tony B. and Rita M. Pomerleau Foundation and over 1,000 alumni contributions, the Alumni Center is a multi-use facility housing alumni and development offices and public meeting spaces.“This building will be a tangible way to keep our alumni close to the college,” said President John J. Neuhauser.The building will house a reception room devoted to the former Trinity College, founded by the Sisters of Mercy, to provide a meeting place for alumnae of that college, and to symbolize the historic connection between the two colleges.Antonio PomerleauMr. Pomerleau, 91, a Burlington real estate developer well known for his generosity in Vermont, served on the Saint Michael’s College Board of Trustees in the 1970s, and was awarded an honorary Saint Michael’s doctoral degree in 1994. Two of his sons and a granddaughter graduated from the college, and his son Ernie Pomerleau, SMC class of 1969, currently serves on the college’s Board of Trustees. Tony Pomerleau expressed appreciation for what Saint Michael’s gave his children, and for the college’s commitment to higher education in the Catholic tradition.“St. Mike’s is a great college, and they’re doing a great job,” Mr. Pomerleau said to a student reporter for The Defender, Saint Michael’s student newspaper. “I figured I’ll help.”Building DesignCollege architect James P. Farrington, AIA, associate director of facilities/college architect, was the principal designer of the Pomerleau Center. “I’m very excited,” he said, about the energy efficiency of the building and the Greek Revival design for the structure.The brick building is connected to and has proportions and details similar to Prevel Hall. It is set back from Route 15, between the President’s Residence and the Holcomb Observatory. The 6,500-square-foot structure contains five first floor offices, The Trinity Conference Room, and six upstairs offices. A nicely proportioned function room provides space for dinners, socials, alumni board meetings, and other gatherings, and a handsome fireplace room provides a kind of living room for the building.The College’s First LEED “Green” BuildingThe major thrust of the building, as determined by President Neuhauser, is that it be environmentally friendly, as advanced as technology will allow, and certified as a LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design ) building. The plan incorporates recycled lumber, water conservation structures, regionally available materials, and other features that can give LEED points.The building envelop is “super air tight with high R value,” Architect Farrington said. Every office has a large insulated glass window to provide good day-time lighting, less use of electric lighting, and little heat loss.Wiemann Lamphere Architects of Colchester, Vt., worked with Farrington to complete construction documents. Pizzagalli Construction of Vermont built the Pomerleau Alumni Center. The team is working on final details for securing LEED certification.“Making this building truly green, points the way to whatever else we might do in the 21st century,” President Neuhauser said.At Saint Michael’s College, www.smcvt.edu(link is external), Learn What Matters. Saint Michael’s is a distinctive Catholic liberal arts college that provides education with a social conscience, producing graduates with the intellectual tools to lead a successful, purposeful life that will contribute to peace and justice in our world. Founded in 1904 by the Society of St. Edmund and headed by President John J. Neuhauser, Saint Michael’s is identified by the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s Best 371 Colleges. It is one of 270 colleges and universities nationwide, and one of only 20 Catholic colleges, with a Phi Beta Kappa chapter. Saint Michael’s has 1,900 undergraduate students, some 500 graduate students and 100 international students. Saint Michael’s students and professors have received Rhodes, Woodrow Wilson, Pickering, Guggenheim, Fulbright, and other grants. The college is one of the nation’s Best Liberal Arts Colleges as listed in the 2009 U.S. News & World Report rankings. Saint Michael’s is located just outside Burlington, Vermont, one of America’s top college towns.-30-last_img read more

Vermont Health Department monitors newly contaminated wells at Vermont Yankee

first_imgIn the past month, three groundwater monitoring wells that previously tested negative for tritium have now been shown to be contaminated. All three wells ‘ GZ-23S, GZ-6 and GZ-24S ‘ are north of the underground plume of tritium-contaminated groundwater that the Health Department has been monitoring for the past 13 months. GZ-23S is much closer to the plume, as it is currently defined, compared to GZ-6 and GZ-24S. GZ-23S is approximately on a line between GZ-12 and GZ-13, two sites that have both yielded samples positive for tritium over the last several months. ( Vermont Yankee Groundwater Well Map )These newest results could be evidence that the original plume is broadening from north to south along the river, or that there are other sources responsible for tritium contamination. Vermont Yankee is investigating nearby plant structures, systems and components to determine the source. Northstar Vermont Yankee,The Vermont Department of Health received laboratory data late last week from Entergy Vermont Yankee that indicates samples from groundwater monitoring well GZ-23S tested positive for low levels of tritium. Vermont Yankee’s lower limit of detection (LLD) for tritium is in the range of 670 to 700 picocuries per liter (pCi/L). The test results for the samples collected from GZ-23S during the week of January 24 were 714 and 721 pCi/L. The only sample from GZ-23S that the Health Department Laboratory has received and analyzed so far was taken on December 6 ‘ tritium was not detected in that sample. Vermont Yankee officials also noted that they are plotting all of the underground utilities that run through the plume from the Advanced Off-Gas (AOG) building area. This will help in evaluating whether these structures and components could act as conduits of tritium from the AOG plume into the area sampled by wells GZ-24S and GZ-6. Vermont Yankee officials have verified that they have made provisions to keep the river’s edge site free from winter ice that could prevent testing, and that they plan to sample the COB well again in February.   Groundwater ExtractionAccording to Vermont Yankee, as of February 3 approximately 317,000 gallons of tritium-contaminated groundwater has been pumped out of the ground to date, with approximately 9,700 of those gallons extracted since the re-start of that process on December 30, 2010. Sampling ProvisionsThe Health Department has been urging Vermont Yankee to sample river water at the river’s edge near the centerline of the AOG plume. Groundwater Monitoring Well ResultsThe results that follow are as reported by Vermont Yankee for tritium on February 3, 2011. In addition, Vermont Yankee has been reporting sample results every day to the Health Department since February 1, 2011.As of this report, 11 of the 31 groundwater monitoring wells are testing positive for tritium. With the exception of wells GZ-23S, GZ-6 and GZ-24S, the trend over the past several months has been that tritium concentrations in groundwater near plant structures, systems and components are decreasing. Trends for wells GZ-14 and GZ-22D, the two extraction sites, are trending downward as expected. Trends for GZ-23S, GZ-6 and GZ-24S, as described above, have remained relatively stable over the past two weeks. For this week, only GZ-15 had an increased tritium concentration compared to the last sample date.To date, gamma spectroscopy and special analyses for hard-to-detect radionuclides have not identified any other nuclear power plant-related radioactive materials in groundwater, drinking water or river water.GZ-1: GZ-2: GZ-3: 108,000 on 1/31/11, down from 121,275 on 1/24/11GZ-4: 70,000 on 1/31/11, down from 78,555 on 1/24/11GZ-5: GZ-6: GZ-7: 3,117 on 1/31/11, down from 3,474 on 1/4/11GZ-8: No sample; dry wellGZ-9: GZ-10: GZ-11: GZ-12S: 1,877 on 1/31/11, down from 3,268 on 1/17/11GZ-12D: 114,962 on 1/31/11, down from 130,857 on 1/17/11GZ-13S: GZ-13D: 880 on 1/31/11, down from 1,095 on 1/4/11GZ-14S: 334,136 on 1/31/11, down from 442,149 on 1/10/11GZ-14D: GZ-15: 144,700 on 1/26/11, up from 141,585 on 1/4/11GZ-16: GZ-17: GZ-18S: GZ-18D: GZ-19S: GZ-19D: GZ-20: GZ-21: 6,853 on 1/31/11, down from 8,673 on 1/17/11GZ-22D: 354,906 on 1/31/11, down from 398,557 on 1/17/11GZ-23S: GZ-24S: 4,857 on 2/3/11, down from 8,139 on 1/26/11GZ-25S: GZ-26S: GZ-27S: Source: Vermont Department of Health 2.7.2011 Vermont Yankee officials noted that the soils near GZ-24S and GZ-6 are of very low permeability. This means groundwater moves slowly through the soils. State officials will get further hydrogeological information at a technical briefing scheduled for February 10. The Departments of Health and Environmental Conservation have recommended for some time that samples be frequently obtained from the Construction Office Building (COB) well. Regular sampling will help determine the tritium concentration in this former drinking water well, which is 360 feet deep into bedrock, and help to better understand if other deep water sources could become contaminated. Groundwater Source InvestigationIn a teleconference on February 3, Vermont Yankee noted that it had completed pressure testing of two piping runs suspected as possible sources of new leaks. These are two of five piping runs that are high on the list of possible sources near GZ-24S. In fact, the well was sited at this location to monitor these particular piping runs. Pressure testing indicated that these two piping runs do not appear to be leaking. Preparations are underway to pressure test the other three piping runs. All of these five piping runs are drain lines for systems that normally carry gases. This means that less liquid travels through them. It also means that the concentration of other radioactive materials like cobalt-60, cesium-137 and strontium-90 (Co-60, Cs-137 and Sr-90) should be lower as compared to liquid processing lines. Vermont Yankee officials noted, however, that the concentration of tritium in these drain lines is similar to that of systems that process predominantly liquids with concentrations of about 3 million pCi/L. The Health Department Laboratory will continue to perform additional analyses on well samples from this new investigation area.last_img read more

David Reynolds named deputy commissioner of BISHCA

first_imgDavid Reynolds, Senior Policy Advisor for Health to United States Senator Bernie Sanders, will join BISHCA as Deputy Commissioner of Health Care Administration.  The Health Care Administration oversees hospital budget review and the certificate of need process, maintains health care data bases, oversees quality reporting by hospitals and health insurers and supervises external claim reviews.  HCA is also responsible for liaison between BISHCA and the Green Mountain Care Board.  Reynolds will begin work at BISHCA in early December. ‘David Reynolds brings a rare combination of policy knowledge and on the ground experience in the delivery of health care to our work implementing health care reform in Vermont,’ said BISHCA Commissioner Steve Kimbell.  ‘I am very glad to have him join our team at BISHCA,’ he continued. David Reynolds holds a doctorate in Health Policy from the University of Michigan and brings to his new position extensive career experience in health care programs and policy and in federal and local government.  He is a resident of St. Johnsbury. BISHCA 11.8.2011last_img read more

Mount Snow opened Saturday

first_imgWest Dover, VT (December 10, 2011) Mount Snow Resort,Mount Snow, in West Dover, Vermont, kicked off the 2011/2012 winter ski season on Saturday, December 10, with festivities surrounding the Grand Opening of North America’s only high speed detachable six passenger bubble lift, the Bluebird Express.  The celebration included a ribbon cutting ceremony, champagne spray, lift line party and the entire enthusiastic crowd reciting the Bluebird Oath.The technologically advanced lift cost $8.5 million to install and is now the primary lift from base to summit at Mount Snow carrying passengers to the 3,600-foot summit in just over seven minutes; half the ride time of the fixed grip triple chair it replaced.Link to video coverage of today’s Grand Opening festivities. http://youtu.be/0DfwMkYK8KA(link is external)  last_img read more

On the Blogs: ‘The Emergence of a Class of Fossil Fuel Assets That May Never Again Be Economic’

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享David Fickling for Bloomberg News:As the planet’s climate shifts, lots of things we never expected to happen so quickly have started to occur. Each one of the last 11 months through March, for example, has been the hottest on record for that time of year, according to the U.S.’s National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.Here’s another thing many didn’t expect to see so soon: the emergence of a class of fossil fuel assets that may never again be economic.More than half the assets in the global coal industry are now held by companies that are either in bankruptcy proceedings or don’t earn enough money to pay their interest bills, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. In the U.S., only three of 12 large coal miners traded on public markets escape that ignominious club, separate data show. It’s not true to say no one saw this coming. What’s remarkable is how quickly the forecasts of analysts have come round to match those of activists. Coal “has undergone a long-term structural decline, with little prospect for near-term recovery,” Moody’s analysts led by Anna Zubets-Anderson wrote in a note last week. Of the four major U.S. coal regions, only the Illinois basin has good long-term prospects, they said. Central Appalachia will “cease to be a major coal producing region,” while the Northern Appalachian and Powder River basins will decline too because of competition from gas.To be sure, there are some significant differences between what’s happening and the stranded-assets road map forecast by most climate campaigners. Coal isn’t dying off because of truly coordinated global action on carbon emissions, but because of a more ad hoc collection of regulations and incentives, and because of the rapid fall in natural gas and renewable energy prices.In addition, that $412 billion in assets held by publicly traded coal companies contains barely a ton of unmined rock – the “assets” focused on by climate activists. Mining companies generally don’t factor mineral reserves into their balance sheets, so the assets in Gadfly’s analysis are mostly inventories, cash and invoices, and the machinery used to wash, process and load coal onto trains. If anything, they’re the tip of the iceberg.What could improve coal’s prospects? Chapter 11 is often regarded as a blessing in disguise if it leads to the elimination of debt and the consolidation of unprofitable industries. Just look at North American airlines, which posted more profit last year than in the previous 10 combined after decades spent lurching from bankruptcy to bankruptcy.Companies that could be shuttered are numerous, but the question is whether any restructuring of obligations will be enough to restore profits. Of the $162 billion of assets owned by non-bankrupt coal companies with interest cover below 1, just $35 billion was held by firms that posted Ebit margins above 5 percent in the most recent year. Because those margins are before interest, these companies are barely profitable even ahead of debt questions coming into play. Should any of them fall into bankruptcy, their best hope of restructuring will require sloughing off environmental, employee and supply-chain liabilities, as well as cutting borrowings.Rebuilding North America’s airline industry was also made easier by the fact that demand for air travel keeps rising. That’s not the case with coal. Indeed, consumption by the two biggest consumers – China and the U.S. – is in long-term decline (it’s already fallen close to zero at times in the U.K., the country whose deposits helped ignite the industrial revolution). If supply is to chase that fall in demand, the only route back to profitability will surely pass through a huge number of pit closures. Coal’s season in hell has barely begun.Full item: Coal’s Stranded Assets On the Blogs: ‘The Emergence of a Class of Fossil Fuel Assets That May Never Again Be Economic’last_img read more

Latest U.S. Energy Information Agency data: solar and wind costs trend down

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Agri-Pulse:The cost of building some renewable energy generators is down, according to a data analysis released this week by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). Among newly constructed utility-scale electric generators in 2016, annual capacity-weighted average construction costs for solar photovoltaic (PV) systems and onshore wind turbines fell.New construction for wind and solar power were among the year’s most popular generation additions, with natural gas rounding out the top three. These three technologies accounted for approximately 93 percent of added capacity. Total electric generating capacity increased 50 percent over 2015.Solar PV construction has steadily declined since 2013 when costs were $3,705 per kilowatt (kW) for construction. In 2016, the construction cost was $2,436 per kW as 500 PV generating units added 8 gigawatts (GW) to the energy mix. The EIA could not predict how 2018 tariffs on imported panels might affect future solar PV costs.Wind capacity additions were the most popular in 2016. Utilities added 84 wind turbine projects with a total of 8.8 GW. Construction costs were down slightly from 2015, at $1,630 per kW. The data show capacity-weighted costs were lower for larger wind plants due to shared infrastructure costs.Unlike PV solar and wind generation, construction costs for natural gas generators increased slightly in 2016. In 2016, 100 natural gas-fired generators, totaling 9.8 GW, were added to the electric grid.More: Construction costs decline for wind, solarKallanish Energy:Nearly 500 PV generating units totaling 8,000 megawatts (MW) were added to the electric grid in 2016, making it the second-most common technology installed in 2016, after wind turbines.Utilities added 84 wind turbine projects, totaling 8,800 MW, to the electric grid in 2016. The construction costs for onshore wind generators in 2016 reached $1,630/kW, a slight decrease from 2015.Capacity-weighted costs tend to be lower for larger wind plants. In the past three years, most new wind capacity has been larger plants — 89% of 2016 wind turbine additions were to sites with more than 100 MW. As the capacity added at a site increases, the capacity-weighted construction cost decreases because the siting and infrastructure costs are shared by more turbines and capacity.Wind class — the wind speeds for which a wind turbine is optimized — can also affect wind generator costs; wind turbines designed for high- and medium-speed winds (classes 1 and 2) averaged about $100/kW more than turbines designed for low wind (class 3).In 2016, 100 natural gas-fired generators, totaling 9,800 MW, were added to the electric grid. Costs averaged $895/kW, an increase from $812/kW in 2015. Of the 9,00 MW added, 3,600 MW were combustion turbines.More: Average U.S. construction costs for solar, wind fell in 2016 Latest U.S. Energy Information Agency data: solar and wind costs trend downlast_img read more